Tag: Trump

Will the GOP roll back Obama-era mining bans?

Attacks on public lands continue

The Grand Canyon. @bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

After more than a century of reckless mining that created a toxic legacy of pollution, the Obama administration finally started trying to prevent even more destruction by placing a few areas, including watersheds around the Grand Canyon, off-limits.

Even those modest restrictions are apparently too much for the mining industry and the politicians the industry has bought in Washington, D.C. Utah Republican Congressman Rob Bishop wants to reverse some of the mining bans enacted during the Obama era, says the Center for Biological Diversity, citing a letter from Bishop to Sec. Agriculture Sonny Perdue. Continue reading “Will the GOP roll back Obama-era mining bans?”

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Trump’s EPA cuts threaten Colorado environment

USGS and EPA scientists take earth and water samples below the abandoned Pennsylvania Mine in Summit County, Colorado. @bberwyn photo.

EDF report details risks to clean air, water programs

Staff Report

The Trump administration’s attempted dismantling of the EPA could have far-reaching consequences for Colorado, according to a new report issued by the Environmental Defense Fund.

The organization warns that the proposed 30 percent budget cut would affect public health and environmental cleanups by reducing the agency’s budget to levels last seen in the 1970s.

“The president seeks to roll back common-sense environmental safeguards that have protected the health and well-being of Colorado for decades,” said Elgie Holstein, EDF’s senior director of strategic planning, “This is not just an assault on an agency. It is an assault on public health and safety.” Continue reading “Trump’s EPA cuts threaten Colorado environment”

Sunday set: The Paris climate agreement won’t die

Dont’t despair — act and vote!


The president’s decision to start pulling the U.S. out of the Paris climate agreement was bitter disappointment for many, but it’s important to remember that the signing of the accord wasn’t an end. It marked the beginning of a long and difficult path that was sure to be fraught with challenges along the way. It was also designed to withstand major shocks, including the pull-out of a major signatory like the U.S. After all, this isn’t the first time it happened. The U.S. also failed to follow through on the Kyoto climate protocol. Read about how the Paris agreement was designed with this history in mind in one of my recent stories for Pacific Standard.

It’s also worth remembering that it will take several years for the withdrawal. In fact, the process won’t be complete until the day after the next U.S. presidential election, so perhaps his wrong-headed move can galvanize climate activists to focus on what matters — electing a candidate who will not only stay involved in global climate policy, but who will act decisively on the domestic front and fight for the changes needed in energy policy and many other areas so that the U.S. can actually deliver on climate action.

To me, Trump’s Paris speech was dangerous beyond climate policy. The language he used to justify his decision sounded a lot like the language Hitler used in the 1930 to rally support for his nationalist policies, and Trump’s attack on global cooperation could end up going far beyond climate. Read more on this topic here.

There’s a lot at stake, especially for the countries that can least afford to deal with global warming impacts. During the most recent climate talks in Bonn, the group of most vulnerable countries made it clear that it is a matter of survival. I reported on their concerns here.

And yes, there is reason to be hopeful. While Trump pursues unrealistic goals of dialing back U.S. policy to the age of coal, most other countries, especially India and China, are racing ahead. Their investments in renewable energy are very likely to drive the shape of global energy markets in the coming decades. More here.

EPA removes web pages with climate change information

Will updates reflect real science, or ideology?

Many of the previously existing pages on climate science, greenhouse gases and global warming impacts are no longer available at the current EPA website.

By Bob Berwyn

Continuing its Orwellian policies of trying to create an alternative, fact-free reality, the Trump administration has started to remove climate-related information from the EPA website. As of Friday, April 28, a Google search for EPA climate information leads to a page-update notice, including a statement from a politically appointed spokesperson saying,” “We want to eliminate confusion by removing outdated language first and making room to discuss how we’re protecting the environment and human health by partnering with states and working within the law.” Continue reading “EPA removes web pages with climate change information”

Federal court pauses Clean Power Plan case

The EPA’s Clean Power Plan page is now an anti-science propaganda page of the Trump administration.

U.S. policy in turmoil as Bonn climate summit approaches

Staff Report

The future of the EPA’s Clean Power Plan is still up in the air, as the U.S. Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit has put a hold on legal proceeding pending the new administration’s review. The Clean Power Plan developed under the Obama administration would require modest cuts in greenhouse gas emissions from power plants with the goal of meeting global targets to cap global warming.

“This decision is disappointing but still leaves key issues about the future of the Clean Power Plan to be resolved,” said  David Doniger, director of the Climate and Clean Air Program at the Natural Resources Defense Council. “We will continue to fight in the D.C. Circuit and in the court of public opinion to ensure that the government fulfills its legal obligation to protect the public from climate change.  Continue reading “Federal court pauses Clean Power Plan case”

Trump administration starts push for more offshore drilling

A brown pelican outlined against the sun setting over Lemon Bay in Englewood Florida. The Trump administration wants to open parts of the eastern Gulf of Mexico for drilling, which would threaten ecosystems and tourism. @bberwyn photo.

Prospects for new executive order are unclear and legal challenges await

Staff Report

Donald Trump’s retro administration is taking another step backward by attempting to re-open parts of the Atlantic, Arctic and Pacific oceans, as well as the Eastern Gulf of Mexico, for offshore oil drilling. The executive order announced by Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke requires the the department to conduct a five-year review of the existing program for  oil and gas development on the Outer Continental Shelf.

That could potentially reverse actions taken under President Obama to restrict some offshore drilling, although the feds will have to show scientifically that new offshore drilling is justified economically and can be done without harm to the environment. Legal challenges would also raised to any new proposals to lease areas off the coasts of the U.S. More drilling would also add more heat-trapping greenhouse gas pollution to the atmosphere. Continue reading “Trump administration starts push for more offshore drilling”

Major U.S. companies urge Trump to stay in Paris climate deal

The Paris agreement is the world’s best chance of limiting global warming and avoiding major climate disruptions. @bberwyn photo.

Global agreement helps manage climate risks, generates jobs

Staff Report

Major companies, including across the U.S. economy are urging President Trump to keep the United States in the Paris climate change agreement. The U.S. must stay at the table to help steer efforts to manage rising climate risks and compete in expanding global clean energy markets, according to a letter to the president Trump organized by the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions.

“By committing all countries to action, the agreement expands markets for innovative clean technologies, generating jobs and economic growth,” the letter says. “U.S. companies are well positioned to lead, and lack of U.S. participation could put their access to these growing markets at risk.’’ Continue reading “Major U.S. companies urge Trump to stay in Paris climate deal”