Tag: transportation

Will supersonic travel make a comeback?

 an artist’s concept of a possible Low Boom Flight Demonstration Quiet Supersonic Transport (QueSST) X-plane design. The award of a preliminary design contract is the first step towards the possible return of supersonic passenger travel – but this time quieter and more affordable. Credits: Lockheed Martin
An artist’s concept of a possible Low Boom Flight Demonstration Quiet Supersonic Transport (QueSST) X-plane design. The award of a preliminary design contract is the first step towards the possible return of supersonic passenger travel – but this time quieter and more affordable. Image courtesy Lockheed Martin.

NASA teams with Lockhead to develop faster-than-sound jet

Staff Report

World travelers itching for a faster ride may see their desire satisfied in the years to come. NASA announced this week that it’s budgeted about $20 million for developing a design for a new “low-boom” supersonic jet that could fly faster than the speed of sound (about 760 mph). Most existing passenger jets cruise along at about 570 mph.

The new NASA initiative is aimed at designing the first in a series of X-planes as part of the  New Aviation Horizons initiative, introduced in the agency’s Fiscal Year 2017 budget. Continue reading “Will supersonic travel make a comeback?”

Climate: Airlines targeted for big emissions cuts

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Airlines could cut greenhouse gas emissions significantly simply by adopting the best available technologies. @bberwyn photo.

Existing technology enough to achieve big reductions, new report says

Staff Report

A new report shows that the world’s airlines could use existing technology to cut heat-trapping greenhouse emissions by 50 percent in the next few decades.

The report came as high-level officials prepare to meet in Paris to finalize a global climate deal aimed at trying to cap global warming at 2 degrees Celsius. Continue reading “Climate: Airlines targeted for big emissions cuts”

Climate: Can the transportation sector achieve big cuts in greenhouse gas emissions?

Evening train, platform 7.
A big shift away from automobiles to public transportation could help cap greenhouse gas pollution from the transportation sector. @bberwyn photo.

New studies sees potential for reductions with fundamental shifts in transportation policies

Staff Report

The heat-trapping pollution spewing from trucks, cars, busses, ships and airplanes adds up to a hefty 23 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions — and they are projected to double by 2050.

But with a concerted effort, the transportation sector could cut that amount by half within the next 35 years. Needed is more fuel efficiency and more public transit in cities, along with a large-scale shift to electric cars, according to a new study that took a close look at emissions from transportation. Continue reading “Climate: Can the transportation sector achieve big cuts in greenhouse gas emissions?”

Breckenridge voters approve new lift ticket tax

Morning alpenglow paints the summit of Breckenridge Ski Area.
Starting next season, some skiers and snowboarders will be paying an extra 4.5 percent on their lift tickets (season passes excluded) to help pay for needed transportation and parking infrastructure. @bberwyn photo.

New revenue to fund transportation improvements

Staff Report

The turnout wasn’t exactly overwhelming, but those Breckenridge voters who did bother to cast a ballot Tuesday overwhelmingly voted in favor of a ballot measure  authorizing a 4.5 percent lift ticket tax.

The preliminary tally shows 917 votes in favor of ballot measure 2A, with just 185 no votes. The new tax is aimed at funding long-term funding for parking and transit solutions in the jam-packed tourist town. Continue reading “Breckenridge voters approve new lift ticket tax”

Study says changes in air traffic patterns could cut fuel costs and greenhouse gas emissions

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Airlines could save money and cut emissions by adjusting the rhythm of transatlantic flights. @bberwyn photo.

Changing flight intervals could save $10 million per year

By Bob Berwyn

Tweaking flight paths across the Atlantic could yield huge savings in fuel costs and help cut airline greenhouse gas emissions.

“If the lateral separation between the aircraft can be reduced, they can be spaced closer and remain more in line with their optimum flight paths. Overall, this would produce fuel economy as most aircraft save fuel at higher cruise altitudes,” said Antonio Trani, director of Virginia Tech’s Air Transportation Systems Laboratory and a professor of civil and environmental engineering.

Trani and fellow researchers reached their conclusions after studying flight information and fuel consumption for air traffic in the North Atlantic oceanic airspace. The research is part of the Future Air Navigation System started in the 1990s that focused on communication between aircraft and air traffic control services, conducted for the Federal Aviation Agency. Continue reading “Study says changes in air traffic patterns could cut fuel costs and greenhouse gas emissions”

Breckenridge, Vail Resorts compromise on proposed lift ticket tax

Morning alpenglow paints the summit of Breckenridge Ski Area.
Morning alpenglow paints the summit of Breckenridge Ski Area.

New ballot measure will exclude season passes

Staff Report

FRISCO — The ski town showdown over a proposed lift-ticket tax in Breckenridge ended with a whimper rather than a bang, as the town and Vail Resorts reached a compromise on the issue.

According to a press release from the town, the language of the ballot measure seeking voter approval of the new tax will be tweaked to exclude season passes and summer lift tickets from what town officials have called an admissions tax. Continue reading “Breckenridge, Vail Resorts compromise on proposed lift ticket tax”

Funding finalized, CDOT will four-lane more of Hwy. 9

Busy highway to be moved away from Dillon Reservoir

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The new Highway 9 alignment will run where the recpath is now, while the recpath will be moved closer to the shore of Dillon Reservoir.

Some community discussion on this project at this Facebook post.

Staff Report

FRISCO — With Vail Resorts, Breckenridge and Summit County pledging more than $1 million combined toward Highway 9 upgrades, the Colorado Department of Transportation will be able to move ahead with widening the busy highway in the Iron Springs section, between Farmers Korner and Frisco.

CDOT had tabbed the four-laning of the highway as a high priority project that qualifies for accelerated construction and funding as long as there is a 20 percent match from local public and private partners. With that money now on the table, CDOT will be able to put the project up for bid this fall, with construction slated for 2016 and and 2017. Continue reading “Funding finalized, CDOT will four-lane more of Hwy. 9”