Tag: photography

Morning photo: Got greens?


It’s always fun to watch the world come out of winter hibernation and nothing says spring like lush green. Add a sprinkle of raindrops and a few flowers — not to mention a colorful mural, and let the good time roll. It’s a time and hope, both of which are needed in these troubled times. If the Earth can renew itself, so can we!

Morning photo: Morning has broken …

In the mountains …

When there’s a crack in the sky between the horizon and the clouds, and the sun comes up and fills that crack with pure light, it’s magic. And there’s other kinds of mountain magic too — the clearing of a winter storm, when the cloud veil parts to reveal a frosted world, or the light of an afternoon thunderstorm, all dark and ominous, while the foreground is bathed in bright sunshine. Check out more mountain light in the online Summit Voice gallery, where you can but prints, postcards and more and support online journalism!

Sunday set: Critters

Spiders are cool!

Even though I’m not a wildlife photographer, every now and then, a hapless animal cross in front of my lens. If I’m lucky, I manage to snap the shutter at the right moment to capture a halfway decent image. That always makes me happy, until I remember that humanity’s completely unsustainable approach to life is putting many other species at serious risk of extinction. Pesticides threaten many insects, especially pollinators that are so critical to ensuring a sustainable food supply. Reptiles like turtles are also threatened by impacts to water quality and wetlands, and many other species are being lost because of habitat fragmentation and, of course, climate change. If we can’t find ways to sustain the web of life that sustains us, we’re likely to become an endangered species ourselves. Some people would argue that we already are. Visit the online Summit Voice gallery to purchase landscape and nature prints — a great way to support independent journalism.

Morning photo: Got light?

Mountain joy!

You can think of this handful of mountain shots from the Summit Voice archives as bowl of eyecandy on this Saturday. From winter wave clouds at sunrise to summer rainbows, the brilliance of mountain light is always something special. Visit our online gallery for more images from the Colorado high country.

Morning photo: Countryside …

Spring landscapes

The Lower Austrian landscape encompasses everything from wild beech forests and deep river canyons to manicured fields — not to mention acres and acres of vineyard, but that’s another story! Austrians are still getting used to the concept of national parks. Thayatal was founded in 2002, so some local visitors still don’t quite understand why the park managers simply leave downed trees on the ground. It’s considered a waste by some, and the park features signs explaining how it’s a deliberate effort to recreate landscapes where natural processes are left to function without much interference. In this small country, nearly every acre of land is spoken for, most of it outside towns and cities dedicated to agriculture, but slowly, resource managers are making some headway in restoring natural ecosystems in a few areas, to the benefit of native species.

Morning photo: Spring in Vienna

Downtown Wien …

It doesn’t take long for Vienna to wake from its winter sleep. Just as soon as temperatures get into the 50s and 60s and the sun peaks out a little, cafes set up their outside tables where people huddle around even if they still have to wear a winter coat. In the parks and town squares, flowering trees add splashes of color to the neighborhood scene, and ping pong enthusiasts can strike up a friendly game in the park near the Flakturm. But keep your umbrella handy because April showers are not uncommon in the Danube metropolis.

Morning photo: Marillenblüte

Spring in the Wachau world heritage region

Nothing says spring like blooming fruit trees, and one of the most beautiful places to view this annual spring spectacle is in the Wachau region of Austria, along the Danube River between Krems and Melk. Perhaps best known for producing stellar crops of apricots — not to mention wine grapes, the Wachau is designated as a world heritage region for the values of its cultural landscape, including agriculture, ancient castles and villages and terraced vineyards that have been cultivated for centuries.

The area’s natural forests were cleared during the Stone Age, from which date famed relics like the Venus of Willendorf, a fertility figure shaped some 25,000 years ago. Around 800 AD, bishops from Salzburg and Bavaria started cultivating the hillsides for wine grapes, creating the present-day landscape pattern of vine terraces. Learn more about the region at UNESCO’s world heritage website.