Tag: permafrost

Climate: Thawing Arctic lakes could boost greenhouse gases

Arctic lakes
Ice on Arctic lakes is thinning dramatically, leading to thawing permafrost beneath. @bberwyn photo.

New study measures permafrost changes with impacts to carbon cycle

Staff Report

Global warming is limiting the growth of seasonal ice on Arctic lakes, which could have implications for the global carbon cycle. new study accepted for publication in Geophysical Research Letters, permafrost beneath shallow Arctic lakes is starting to thaw — another sign of the widespread Arctic meltdown due to climate change.

Another recent study found that Arctic lakes in Canada’s northern archipelago are drying at an unprecedented rate. The findings also support previous University of Waterloo research on Arctic lake ice.

The changes stem from warmer winter temperatures and increased snowfall during the past 30 years. Lakebed temperatures of Arctic lakes less than 1 meter (3 feet) deep have warmed by 2.4 degrees Celsius (4.3 degrees Fahrenheit) during the past three decades, and during five of the last seven years, the mean annual lakebed temperature has been above freezing, the study found. Continue reading “Climate: Thawing Arctic lakes could boost greenhouse gases”

How much CO2 will melting permafrost release?

Highway to the West Fjords region of Iceland
The warming of the world’s tundra and permafrost areas will have a huge effect on global climate. @bberwyn photo.

New study shows soil moisture is a big factor in global warming equation

Staff Report

Methane won’t be the only problem as Arctic permafrost thaws in the coming decades. A new study shows that, as frozen permafrost areas warm and dry out, they will also release more CO2. The study was led by Northern Arizona University assistant research professor Christina Schädel and published in the journal Nature Climate Change.

The findings show that a 10 degree Celsius increase in soil temperature released twice as much carbon into the atmosphere, and drier, aerobic soil conditions released more than three times more carbon than wetter, anaerobic soil conditions. Continue reading “How much CO2 will melting permafrost release?”

USGS study projects Alaska permafrost losses

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A new USGS study projects a significant permafrost meltdown in Alaska by 2100.

Near-surface permafrost areas could shrink by 16-24 percent

Staff Report

Global warming is likely to take a big bite out of Alaska’s permafrost the next few decades, U.S. Geological Survey researchers said after analyzing new satellite data.

The maps suggest that the near-surface permafrost that presently underlies 38 percent of boreal and arctic Alaska would be reduced by 16 to 24 percent by the end of the 21st century under widely accepted climate scenarios. Permafrost declines are more likely in central Alaska than northern Alaska. Continue reading “USGS study projects Alaska permafrost losses”

Climate: Permafrost meltdown triggers quick release of greenhouse gases to atmosphere

USGS researchers make ground-based permafrost measurements in Alaska.
USGS researchers make ground-based permafrost measurements in Alaska. Photo courtesy USGS.

Alaska study helps quantify climate impacts of melting permafrost

Staff Report

Much of the carbon stored in ancient Alaska soils could be released to the atmosphere shortly upon melting, according to a new study that aimed to help quantify how fast permafrost decomposes and how much carbon dioxide is produced in the process.

The measurements are important because frozen organic soils are not part of the carbon cycle — but they will be as they thaw, potentially releasing huge amounts of heat-trapping gases. Continue reading “Climate: Permafrost meltdown triggers quick release of greenhouse gases to atmosphere”

New data network to track permafrost meltdown

How soon, how fast & how much?

Antarctica permafrost
Antarctic permafrost is melting at an accelerating rate. @bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

LINZ — The Earth’s permafrost regions are one of the biggest wild cards in the climate change equation. Some researchers have warned that a quick meltdown could release so much methane that it would trigger runaway global warming, while other recent studies suggest that permafrost will probably melt gradually.

The bottom line is that scientists still don’t know for sure how fast the meltdown will be, but a new data portal called the Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost will help researchers coordinate information and serve as an early warning system for researchers and decision-makers around the globe.

Continue reading “New data network to track permafrost meltdown”

NASA to take big-picture look at Arctic climate change

Space-based data to help reveal ecosystem changes

Satellites have long been tracking sea ice loss in the Canadian Arctic, and new climate models suggest that glaciers in the region are also declining rapidly. Visit this NASA Earth Observatory page for more information.
Satellites have long been tracking sea ice loss in the Canadian Arctic, and new climate models suggest that glaciers in the region are also declining rapidly. Visit this NASA Earth Observatory page for more information.

Staff Report

FRISCO — With more and more studies showing big climate-change impacts to Arctic and subarctic ecosystems, NASA is launching a research project to try and understand the bigger picture.

Some recent studies have shown how boreal forests are shifting quickly as temperatures in the high latitudes soar faster than than the rest of the planet. Biologists are trying to project how global warming will affect wildlife in the region, while another study projects that the “green-up” of the Arctic will amplify global warming.

NASA’s 10-year Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) will bring together on-the-ground research in Alaska and northwestern Canada with data collected by NASA airborne instruments, satellites and other agency programs, including SMAP, OCO-2, and upcoming ICESat-2 and NISAR missions. Continue reading “NASA to take big-picture look at Arctic climate change”

Climate: Another warning on permafrost ‘tipping point’

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Melting permafrost could trigger a massive surge in global greenhouse gas emissions.

‘The real and imminent threat posed by permafrost thawing must be communicated clearly and broadly to the general public and the policy community’

Staff Report

FRISCO — Policy makers should pay more attention to the potential to the potential for greenhouse gas emissions from melting permafrost, a team of researchers warned in a special bulletin, released as President Obama prepares to attend an international conference on the Arctic.

Arctic permafrost – ground that has been frozen for many thousands of years – is thawing, and the results could be disastrous and irreversible, potentially triggering a spiral of global warming far beyond any of the scenarios currently envisioned, a team of scientists with the Woods Hole Research Center wrote in a policy brief. Continue reading “Climate: Another warning on permafrost ‘tipping point’”