Tag: oceans

Pollution from China disrupts ocean ecosystems

Shifting nutrient balance shapes plankton blooms

A plankton bloom in the Arctic waters of the Barents Sea. Photo courtesy NASA.
A plankton bloom in the Arctic waters of the Barents Sea. Photo courtesy NASA.

Staff Report

Pollution from Chinese factories is changing the nutrient balance in the ocean, say scientists who studied depositions of chemicals and plankton blooms in the East China Sea. These waters are increasingly threatened by harmful algal blooms that choke off vital fish populations, according to the new study, led by researchers at the University of California, Irvine.

“There has been massive growth in emissions from China’s factories and cars over the past few decades, and what comes out of the smokestacks and tailpipes tends to be richer in nitrogen than phosphorus,” said Katherine Mackey, assistant professor of Earth system science at UCI and lead author of the study, published recently in Frontiers in Marine Science. Continue reading “Pollution from China disrupts ocean ecosystems”

Advertisements

Non-native species invade Mediterranean through newly enlarged Suez Canal

Scientists warn of ecosystem, health impacts

asdf
Port Cros National Park, France. A new study says native marine ecosystems in the Mediterranean are at risk from non-native species invading via the Suez Canal. @bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

Scientists say the 2015 expansion of the Suez Canal has enabled non-native species to swarm into the Mediterranean, potentially impacting fisheries and human health.

“The Mediterranean Sea is the most invaded marine basin in the world. The number of non-indigenous species greatly increased between 1970 and 2015. 750 multicellular non-indigenous species were recorded in the Mediterranean Sea, far more than in other European seas, because of the ever-increasing number of Red Sea species introduced through the Suez Canal,” said Bella Galil of the Israel National Center for Biodiversity Studies. “This raises concerns about the increasing introductions of additional NIS and associated degradation and loss of native populations, habitats and ecosystem services.” Continue reading “Non-native species invade Mediterranean through newly enlarged Suez Canal”

New surveys confirm Great Barrier Reef damage

Heat-driven coral bleaching continues to take a toll

Staff Report

A new survey of the Great Barrier Reef shows that an ocean heat wave that peaked last March killed up to 95 percent of corals in some parts of the northern reef.  And in the aftermath of the worst coral-bleaching event on record, predatory snails are now taking on toll on the remaining corals.

According to the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, researchers recently returned to 83 reefs they surveyed at the height of the bleaching event.

“Millions of corals in the north of the Great Barrier Reef died quickly from heat stress in March and since then, many more have died more slowly,” said Dr. Greg Torda whose team recently returned from re-surveying reefs near Lizard Island. Continue reading “New surveys confirm Great Barrier Reef damage”

Ocean acidification seen as huge threat to Atlantic cod

sdfg
Climate change to put a big hit on cod stocks.

Fish larvae seen as highly sensitive to CO2

Staff Report

New lab experiments suggest that increasing ocean acidification could take a big bite out of the economically important cod fishery in the North Atlantic. The research suggests that the buildup of CO2 in the ocean could double the mortality of newly-hatched cod larvae.

Members of the German research network BIOACID quantified the impacts, showing that recruitment could decrease to levels of one quarter to one twelfth of the recruitment of the last decades. Cod have already been under intense fishing pressure for decades, and the new study, published in the online journal PLOS ONE, identifies climate change as an emerging new threat. Continue reading “Ocean acidification seen as huge threat to Atlantic cod”

Sunday Set: Ocean view

Azure

So many moods in the deep blue sea, changing from day to day, and even from hour to hour. This set features shots from a jaunt along the Mediterranean coast of Italy and France, including a few moon rise time exposures. The cove image from the French island of Port Cros, a national park off the coast of Hyères. The moonrise shots are near Cap Corsaire.

New study documents biodiversity in proposed deep sea mining zone

Researchers call for balance between mining and ecosystem protection

'j
A species of cnidarian in the genus Relicanthus with 8-foot long tentacles attached to a dead sponge stalk on a nodule in the eastern Clarion-Clipperton Zone. These are closely related to anemones. Photo credit: Diva Amon and Craig Smith, University of Hawai’i at Mānoa.

Staff Report

New research shows that proposed mining on the seafloor of the Pacific Ocean would likely have a huge impact on marine biodiversity. A study published in the journal Scientific Reports, documents an “impressive abundance and diversity among the creatures” on the seafloor in the Clarion-Clipperton Zone — an area in the equatorial Pacific Ocean being targeted for deep-sea mining.

“We found that this exploration claim area harbors one of the most diverse communities of megafauna (animals over 2 cm in size) to be recorded at abyssal depths in the deep sea,” lead author Diva Amon said in a press release.

The researchers explained that a combination of biological, chemical and geological processes formed a high concentrations of polymetallic “manganese” nodules on the deep seafloor in the CCZ–an area nearly the size of the contiguous United States. These nodules are potentially valuable sources of copper, nickel, cobalt and manganese, among other metals, which has led to an interest in mining this region. Continue reading “New study documents biodiversity in proposed deep sea mining zone”

Conservation groups seek trade sanctions against Mexico in effort to save the endangered vaquita

Continued illegal gill net fishing cited in push for ban on Mexican seafood

vaquita
There may be as few as 60 endangered vaquita remaining in the Gulf of California. Photo courtesy NOAA.

Staff Report

In what could be a last-ditch effort to save imperiled vaquita in the Gulf of California, conservation advocates are urging the Obama administration to launch economic sanctions against Mexico to halt that country’s trade in totoaba. According to the Center for Biological Diversity, the sanctions would be justified because Mexico is violating the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) by not enforcing the ban on totoaba trade.

The June 28 letter to high level U.S. Cabinet officials is the latest step in a long-running an complex struggle to prevent extinction of vaquitas, an endangered porpoise that lives in only a small section of the upper Gulf of California. My some estimates, there may only be 60 individuals remaining. Continue reading “Conservation groups seek trade sanctions against Mexico in effort to save the endangered vaquita”