Tag: mountains

Mountains matter!

Dec. 11 is International Mountain Day

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Celebrate mountains! @bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

Mountains are much more than just a scenic backdrop for tourist snapshots.They are reservoirs of biodiversity and water, helping to sustain life in the valleys and plains below. And since the dawn of humankind, high peaks have drawn people as places of profound insight, spiritual awakening and inspiration.

Once a year, led by the UN, the world celebrates those gifts with International Mountain Day. This year’s theme is focused on mountain products, especially in developing countries, where the creation of sustainable mountain economies will contribute to a better future for what traditionally have been some of the poorest areas in the world. Continue reading “Mountains matter!”

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Morning photo: Winter glow

Snow!

Fresh snow on Tenmile Creek in Summit County, Colorado.
November snow on Tenmile Creek in Summit County, Colorado.

FRISCO — Usually in mid-November I’m waiting for snow, photographing ice formations on local creeks. But this year, the snow came before the ice, which means that some familiar spots look quite different. It’ll be interesting to see how the ice forms this year, as the snow is sure to be a factor in shaping the process. In some cases, the snow appears to insulate the streams from the cold air, inhibiting ice, but in other places, the spray from the creeks will saturate the snow and gradually turn it into ice … stay tuned for more! Continue reading “Morning photo: Winter glow”

Morning photo: Post-storm glow

November …

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Sunlight paints Peak 1, in the Tenmile Range, as a winter storm clears out.

FRISCO — I feel like I’ve been holding my breath the past few weeks, waiting to see if it will actually snow. That late-fall period has been suspenseful for me since I was a little kid, starting to get seriously hooked on skiing, but the feeling has intensified the last few years, as global warming creates more and more uncertainty in global weather patterns. From the way I understand it — and I’ve been studying this a lot — there’s every reason to believe that we could experience a winter without much snow at any time. Just look at California the past few years. It’s easy to see how a shift of the regional weather pattern could bring a sustained and bitter drought to Colorado. That’s probably why I breathed such a deep sigh of relief this week as the skies finally relented and dropped more than a foot of snow even here at the valley level in Frisco.

Follow our Instagram feed for daily photo updates and visit our online gallery for a great selection of Colorado landscape and nature images, available as fine art prints and greeting cards. Continue reading “Morning photo: Post-storm glow”

Morning photo: Mountain glow

Peak light

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An eclipese-tinged glow over the Rockies, photographed from Loveland Pass, Colorado.

FRISCO — There are times when the light in the mountains totally blows my mind, and when it’s easy to understand why mountains have long been considered sacred, and even dwelling places of the gods. It seems, sometimes, that if one could only gaze upon the peaks long enough, all the mysteries of the universe would be revealed. So there are times that, after taking a few photos, I set down the camera, hoping to gain a little more insight into this great wonderful world of ours. Continue reading “Morning photo: Mountain glow”

Climate: Heat-trapping greenhouse gases the biggest driver of global glacier meltdown

‘In our data we find unambiguous evidence of anthropogenic contribution to glacier mass loss’

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Shrinking glaciers on the Dachstein Mountains in Austria will affect water supplies far downstream in local areas and in distant rivers. bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

FRISCO — Some of the world’s glaciers were shrinking before the onset of unchecked heat-trapping pollution, but the human factor in the glacial equation has grown exponentially in the past few decades.

A new modeling study led by scientists at the University of Innsbruck (Austria) shows that only about 25 percent of the global glacier mass loss during the period of 1851 to 2010 is attributable to anthropogenic causes. However, between 1991 and 2010 the fraction increased to about two-thirds.

“In the 19th and first half of 20th century we observed that glacier mass loss attributable to human activity is hardly noticeable but since then has steadily increased,” said researcher Ben Marzeion, explaining that scaled-down regional models can detect an anthropogenic influence in America and the Alps, where glacier changes are particularly well documented. Continue reading “Climate: Heat-trapping greenhouse gases the biggest driver of global glacier meltdown”

Morning photo: Colorado sunset

Can you feel it?

A Bierstadt moment in Colorado.
A Bierstadt moment in Colorado.

FRISCO — We cruised down to one of our favorite Gore Range overlooks a couple of days ago on an afternoon when the clouds looked promising (from a photography standpoint) and weren’t disappointed. OK, so we didn’t get a firecracker sky, but some of the subtle glows that played across the craggy summits of the peaks were extraordinary. Here’s  a sample of the shots we got, and there are more Summit County nature and landscape images available for purchase at our online Fine Art America gallery. Support the arts and independent journalism with your purchase of prints or notecards! Continue reading “Morning photo: Colorado sunset”