Tag: invasive species

Non-native species invade Mediterranean through newly enlarged Suez Canal

Scientists warn of ecosystem, health impacts

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Port Cros National Park, France. A new study says native marine ecosystems in the Mediterranean are at risk from non-native species invading via the Suez Canal. @bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

Scientists say the 2015 expansion of the Suez Canal has enabled non-native species to swarm into the Mediterranean, potentially impacting fisheries and human health.

“The Mediterranean Sea is the most invaded marine basin in the world. The number of non-indigenous species greatly increased between 1970 and 2015. 750 multicellular non-indigenous species were recorded in the Mediterranean Sea, far more than in other European seas, because of the ever-increasing number of Red Sea species introduced through the Suez Canal,” said Bella Galil of the Israel National Center for Biodiversity Studies. “This raises concerns about the increasing introductions of additional NIS and associated degradation and loss of native populations, habitats and ecosystem services.” Continue reading “Non-native species invade Mediterranean through newly enlarged Suez Canal”

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At the nexus of climate change and invasive species

What happens when the trout streams warm?

A palm-size brook trout, caught in the Tenmile Creek drainage near Copper Mountain.
A palm-size brook trout, caught in the Tenmile Creek drainage near Copper Mountain. @bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

U.S. Geological Survey scientists have completed one of the first experimental studies to explore links between climate change and invasive species, specifically how  brook trout and brown trout interact with rising stream temperatures. They found that non-native browns limit the ability of brook trout to use warmer water temperatures, By contrast, removin of browns brook trouts’ reach into warmer waters.

Brookies are freshwater fish native to eastern North America and threatened by climate change because of their requirement for cold stream temperatures. Brown trout are native to Europe and have been introduced all around North America. Continue reading “At the nexus of climate change and invasive species”

Endangered and invasive species meet in the desert Southwest

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A southwestern willow flycatcher. Photo courtesy USGS.

New data to help inform tamarisk eradication and bird conservation efforts

Staff Report

New mapping by the U.S. Geological Survey may help resource managers in the southwestern U.S. figure out how they can bolster populations of the endangered southwestern willow flycatcher while at the same time trying to control an unwanted invasive plant that provides habitat for the tiny songbird.

The new report from the USGS provides detailed habitat information on the entire range of of the flycatcher, which breeds in lush, dense vegetation along rivers and streams from May through September. In 2013, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service designated 1,975 stream kilometers as critical flycatcher habitat, located in six states and 38 counties.

“The satellite model provides us with new capabilities to locate and monitor potential flycatcher habitat within individual watersheds and across its entire range” said James Hatten, Research Biogeographer with the USGS and the report’s author. “The satellite model also revealed how the quantity of flycatcher habitat is affected annually by drought conditions, with habitat declining in California from 2013 to 2015, while increasing in New Mexico and Texas.” Continue reading “Endangered and invasive species meet in the desert Southwest”

Warming oceans to aid spread of invasive species in Antarctica

Kelp rafts seen pathways for non-native worms, snails

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For now, humans are the main invasive species in Antarctica, but that could change as the surrounding ocean warms. @bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

Parts of Antarctica could soon face an invasion by exotic species floating southward on kelp rafts, Australian researchers found in a new study published in the journal Ecography.

While the Antarctic circumpolar current has long formed a barrier to invasive species, the research found that the kelp rafts often cross that Antarctic Polar Front, carrying with them crustaceans, worms, snails and other seaweeds across hundreds of kilometres of open ocean. Continue reading “Warming oceans to aid spread of invasive species in Antarctica”

Florida’s latest invasive species is a potential man-eater

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Nile crocodiles may be spreading out Florida. Photo courtesy MathKnight and Zachi Evenor, via Wikipedia and the Creative Commons.

Scientists say Nile crocs may be thriving in Sunshine State swamps

Staff Report

The latest non-native species to invade Florida’s subtropical clime is a man-eater, according to University of Florida researchers who say they’ve genetically identified Nile crocodiles living in the swamps of the Sunshine State.

The aquatic reptiles can grow as long as 18 feet and weigh as much as a small car, and in their native habitat eat everything from hippos and zebras to humans. In Florida, they could eat native birds, fish and mammals, as well as the state’s native crocodile and alligators, said the researchers, have confirmed the capture of multiple Nile crocodiles in the wild, using DNA analysis.

Crocodylus niloticus, as they’re known scientifically, were blamed for at least 480 attacks on people and 123 fatalities in Africa between 2010 and 2014. Three juveniles, likely released by humans, have been found in South Florida, swimming in the Everglades and relaxing on a house porch in Miami. Continue reading “Florida’s latest invasive species is a potential man-eater”

Bat-killing white-nose syndrome jumps to West Coast

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A little brown bat infected with white-nose syndrome. Photo via USGS.

Conservation advocates call for more protective measures to protect bat populations

Staff Report

A bat-killing disease that has been spreading across the U.S. westward from the East Coast has now been found in the Far West. White-nose syndrome, which has devastated bat populations, was confirmed in a little brown bat near Noth Bend, in Washington State, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

According to the USFWS, it’s the first recorded occurrence of white-nose syndrome in western North America. The fungal disease has killed more than six million beneficial insect-eating bats in North America since it was first documented nearly a decade ago. Most recently, biologists documented the spread of the disease in Oklahoma.
Continue reading “Bat-killing white-nose syndrome jumps to West Coast”

Biodiversity: Snake-killing fungal disease spreads to Louisiana

Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola, a fungus that is afflicting snakes across the Midwest and Eastern US, shares many traits with Pseudogymnoascus destructans the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome in bats, researchers report. Credit Julie McMahon
Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola, a fungus that is afflicting snakes across the Midwest and Eastern US, shares many traits with Pseudogymnoascus destructans the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome in bats, researchers report.
Credit: Julie McMahon.

‘Snakes may not be everyone’s favorite animal, but they are undeniably important in a well-balanced ecosystem’

Staff Report

A rapidly spreading fungal disease that’s killing some snake species at an alarming rate has now been found in in Louisiana for the first time, according to a new study by U.S. Geological Survey scientists. Snake fungal disease now has been confirmed in at least 16 states in the Eastern and Midwestern United States.

Biologists tracking SFD have said it’s “eerily similar” to the fungus that has wiped out millions of bats across the eastern U.S. The snake and bat pathogens emerged in North America in the mid-2000s. Both are moving from east to west across the United States and into parts of Canada. Biologists have also recently identified another fungal pathogen that’s threatening North American salamanders. Continue reading “Biodiversity: Snake-killing fungal disease spreads to Louisiana”