Tag: grizzlies

Can grizzlies survive global warming?

New study shows many bears still rely on dwindling whitebark pine seeds

An adult grizzly bear in the brush. Photo courtesy USFWS.

Staff Report

The long-term survival of grizzles in the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem may depend on whether they’re willing to switch from eating whitebark pine seeds to other types food.

Some of the bears have already started responding to reductions in whitebark trees by consuming more plants and berries, while others are still focused on finding stashes of the nutritious pine nuts, scientists said in a new study based on analyzing the chemical composition of what the grizzlies eat. Continue reading “Can grizzlies survive global warming?”

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Wildlife: Wyoming grizzly hunting plan challenged in court

Grizzly bear attacks are rare, and hikers are encouraged to carry pepper spray to deter attacks. PHOTO COURTESY U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE.
Grizzlies are under the gun in Wyoming. Photo via USFWS.

Activists say public was short-changed on comment period

Staff Report

Wildlife advocates are going to court to challenge a proposed grizzly hunting plan in Wyoming. A lawsuit filed last week alleges that he Wyoming Game and Fish Commission illegally fast-tracked approval of the plan without allowing adequate public comment.

The approval would authorize the state’s first trophy hunt of grizzly bears in 40 years, but the public only had 30 days to review and comment on the plan — far too short to be able to evaluate the biological consequences of the proposed hunt. The commission simultaneously adopted a tri-state memorandum of agreement with Idaho and Montana to formalize quotas for grizzly hunts, allocating over 50 percent of the quota to Wyoming. Continue reading “Wildlife: Wyoming grizzly hunting plan challenged in court”

Feds want to take grizzlies off Endangered Species List

Grizzlies were declared a threatened species in Alberta last week. PHOTO COURTESY THE U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE.
Grizzlies may be taken off the Endangered Species List. Photo courtesy USFWS.

Conservation groups, Native Americans not keen on delisting plan

By Bob Berwyn

A federal claim that grizzly bears no longer need endangered species protection has been met with great skepticism from wildlife advocates and from Native Americans who consider the species sacred.

According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the restoration of grizzles in Montana, Wyoming and Idaho is a success story, but the bears only live in about 4 percent of their historic range — which means a proposal to delist the species can’t possibly meet the intent of the Endangered Species Act. Continue reading “Feds want to take grizzlies off Endangered Species List”

Wildlife conservation groups say cultural hostility to grizzlies could threaten their recovery in northern Rockies

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Grizzlies may still be facing some challenges despite making a good recovery in the northern Rockies. Photo courtesy Dr. Christopher Servheen, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Feds taking comment on plan to hand over management to states

By Summit Voice

FRISCO — Conservation groups led by the Center for Biological Diversity say a federal plan for Yellowstone grizzly bears puts their fate in the hands of states that are “culturally hostile” to large carnivores. The recovery plan could put grizzlies back on the road toward extinction, the group warned in their comments to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Wildlife conservation advocates are also worried that the plan doesn’t do enough to safeguard connectivity between populations. They want the federal wildlife agency to maintain Endangered Species Act protections for the bears until these issues can be resolved. Continue reading “Wildlife conservation groups say cultural hostility to grizzlies could threaten their recovery in northern Rockies”

Bear blog: Alberta grizzlies get more protection

Grizzlies were declared a threatened species in Alberta last week. PHOTO COURTESY THE U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE.

Bear tracking pays off in Aspen

A long-term wildlife study in the Aspen area shows that bears prefer natural food and tend to stay out of town when berries are plentiful, according to an Aspen Times story by Scott Condon.

The research was conducted by tagging bears and tracking their movements. One female tracked since 2005 frequently visited the town to search for food in years when natural food crops failed. In other years, the bear rarely ventured into town.

The study seems to reinforce what wildlife managers have been saying all along: Troublesome human-bear conflicts can be avoided by making sure that trash, bird feeders and backyard grills are kept away from the animals — especially in years when natural food is scarce. Read the whole story here.

More on Alberta grizzlies and polar bears after the break … Continue reading “Bear blog: Alberta grizzlies get more protection”