Tag: greenhouse gases

Fossil fuels: ‘Enough is enough’

Colorado demonstration part of global protest movement

Staff Report

As part of a global series of protests against the continued burning of fossil fuels, hundreds of Colorado activists gathered this week in Denver to protest a Bureau of Land Management oil and gas lease auction at the Holiday Inn in Lakewood.

Organizers counted about 300 people at the May 12 rally, who demonstrated with signs and banners and tried to interrupt the auction of new oil and gas leases as part of the larger #keepitintheground movement. The goal is to prevent the catastrophic consequences of unchecked global warming, including deadly heatwaves, droughts, forest fires, water shortages and invasive diseases. Continue reading “Fossil fuels: ‘Enough is enough’”

Climate: UK public basically unaware of ocean acidification

oysters
Love oysters? Then you should be worried about ocean acidification. @bberwyn photo.

Marine life is at risk from CO2 emissions

Staff Report

The reality of global warming may be setting in for many people, but some of the more subtle and unseen impacts of climate change are not so easy to grasp.

A recent survey in the UK showed that only 20 percent of the population are aware of ocean acidification. Even fewer — just 14 percent — say they have a basic understanding of what that means, even though scientists have been reporting their findings on the topic for many years. Continue reading “Climate: UK public basically unaware of ocean acidification”

Global warming will lead to spike in ozone pollution

Western U.S. Counties Violating Current and Proposed Ozone Air Quality Standards.
Western U.S. Counties Violating Current and Proposed Ozone Air Quality Standards. A new study suggests even more spikes in dangerous ozone levels as global temperatures increase. Map courtesy WildEarth Guardians.

New study tracks dangerous public health threat posed by rising temps

Staff Report

Along with catastrophic heatwaves, flooding and droughts, greenhouse gas emissions are likely to result in a big spike in the number of days when air quality is impaired by ozone, according to a new study from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

Left unchecked, global warming could lead to between three and nine additional days per year of unhealthy ozone levels by 2050, the researchers found.

“In the coming decades, global climate change will likely cause more heat waves during the summer, which in turn could cause a 70 to 100 percent increase in ozone episodes, depending on the region,” said Lu Shen, first author and graduate student at SEAS. Continue reading “Global warming will lead to spike in ozone pollution”

Environment: Can a lawsuit shut down one of the West’s biggest and dirtiest coal-burning power plants?

asf
So much coal, so much pollution!

Legal challenge seeks to hasten the end of the fossil fuel era in the Southwest

Staff Report

A coalition of environmental and community groups is challenging the federal government’s decision to extend operations at the coal-fired Four Corners Power Plant for another 25 years. In a new lawsuit, the activists say the approval lacked an assessment of clean energy alternatives.

Specifically, the legal challenge says the federal government’s claim that the power plant won’t harm endangered species violates the Endangered Species Act, and that the final decision violates the National Environmental Policy Act. Continue reading “Environment: Can a lawsuit shut down one of the West’s biggest and dirtiest coal-burning power plants?”

Op-Ed: Bankrupt Peabody should lead on de-carbonization

asdf
Coal is so 19th century!

Can the fossil fuel industry transcend itself?

By Bob Berwyn

If there’s any silver lining to the global warming story these days, it’s that fossil fuel company stock prices are dropping even faster than global temperatures are going up. Investors aren’t buying the climate-denying baloney being peddled by the coal kings and oil barons anymore, as evidenced by this week’s bankruptcy announcement by Peabody Energy — the world’s biggest coal company.

The company’s debt burden is $10.1 billion, but you can be sure that none of its top executives will be standing in a breadline anytime soon. They probably have their money stashed safely in offshore accounts, but that’s the least of our worries. Continue reading “Op-Ed: Bankrupt Peabody should lead on de-carbonization”

EPA faces lawsuit over failure to regulate aircraft emissions

Aerial view of Heathrow Airport
A lawsuit seeks to force the EPA to set standards for airline emissions. @bberwyn photo.

Environmental groups fed up with agency foot-dragging

Staff Report

With the airline industry and the EPA dragging their feet on limiting greenhouse gas emissions from aircraft, environmental groups this week decided to press the issue in court.

The lawsuit, filed by Earthjustice on behalf of the Center for Biological Diversity and Friends of the Earth in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, accuses the EPA of violating the Clean Air Act by unreasonably delaying action on airline emissions. Continue reading “EPA faces lawsuit over failure to regulate aircraft emissions”

Better land use one of the keys to slowing global warming

Wheat field in Upper Austria
More sustainable agricultural practices could help sequester huge amounts of atmospheric carbon. @bberwyn photo.

Study quantifies climate benefits of sustainable land use

Staff Report

Switching to more sustainable forms of land use management could significantly boost the carbon-storing capacity of the planet’s soils — by up to 8 billion tons of greenhouse gases, scientists reported in a new study. Previous research shows that soils currently lock away around 2.4 trillion tonnes of greenhouse gases, which are stored underground as stable organic matter.

The measures identified by the researchers include growing crops with deeper root systems and using charcoal-based composts. Widespread adoption sustainable land use practices and and application of best available technologies could help soils store up to 80 percent of greenhouse gases released by fossil fuel combustion, the researchers calculated. Continue reading “Better land use one of the keys to slowing global warming”