Tag: greenhouse gases

EPA removes web pages with climate change information

Will updates reflect real science, or ideology?

Many of the previously existing pages on climate science, greenhouse gases and global warming impacts are no longer available at the current EPA website.

By Bob Berwyn

Continuing its Orwellian policies of trying to create an alternative, fact-free reality, the Trump administration has started to remove climate-related information from the EPA website. As of Friday, April 28, a Google search for EPA climate information leads to a page-update notice, including a statement from a politically appointed spokesperson saying,” “We want to eliminate confusion by removing outdated language first and making room to discuss how we’re protecting the environment and human health by partnering with states and working within the law.” Continue reading “EPA removes web pages with climate change information”

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EPA chief sued for ‘spouting deceptive climate pseudo-science’

EPA staff concerned about possible data purge

The EPA website clearly discloses how greenhouse gases affect the climate.

Staff Report

EPA administrator Scott Pruitt may have to back up his false claims on greenhouse gases and climate change in court. A lawsuit filed April 13 by the watchdog group Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility wants the agency head to show studies backing up his statements that call into question the role of CO2 emissions in global warming. The lawsuit also seeks to determine whether EPA possesses a single study that supports Mr. Pruitt’s stance.  Continue reading “EPA chief sued for ‘spouting deceptive climate pseudo-science’”

EPA chief Pruitt facing two separate ethics investigations

New EPA administrator Scott Pruitt wants to undo rules to reduce harmful greenhouse gas pollution from coal-fired power plants like Craig Station in Colorado. @bberwyn photo.

Anti-environmental agency head may have violated EPA policies and lied to Congress under oath

By Bob Berwyn

There’s little question that Scott Pruitt is the worst possible person to lead the EPA. He’s been involved in more than a dozen lawsuits against the agency and he’s called for it to be abolished completely, so it’s no surprise that he’s a target for bitter criticism from conservation groups. But his troubles are about to get much bigger than indignant tweets.

The Sierra Club has filed a formal complaint with the Inspector General of the Environmental Protection Agency demonstrating that EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt has violated the Agency’s Scientific Integrity Policy in multiple ways. The filing calls for an investigation into and resolution of Pruitt’s comments on carbon dioxide’s role in fueling the climate crisis.

He’s also now facing an ethics complaint by the Oklahoma Bar Association, which will look at whether Pruitt lied under oath to Congress. Continue reading “EPA chief Pruitt facing two separate ethics investigations”

West Coast states, cities, challenge Trump on climate policies

Leaders vow to fight effort to roll back Clean Power Plan

Mercury, heat-trapping greenhouse gases and other pollutants from the Craig Station power plant in northwest Colorado have global impacts. @bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

The Trump administration will reportedly soon unveil an executive order to try and undo climate policies developed under Obama, but West Coast states say they have intention of going along with that half-baked proposal. Continue reading “West Coast states, cities, challenge Trump on climate policies”

Sunday set: Forests

Trees are our friends

Last week the UN celebrated the International Day of Forests as a way to acknowledge how important forests are to the world. To cynics, it may seem trite lip service by faceless bureaucrats. But in reality, it’s critical that everyone understands how important forests are for the planet. They cover about a  third of the Earth’s land mass and provide livelihoods, medicines, fuel, food and shelter for about 1.6 billion people – including more than 2,000 indigenous cultures. Forests are the most biologically-diverse ecosystems on land, home to more than 80 percent of the terrestrial species of animals, plants and insects. They may also be one of our last, best hopes for slowing climate change. Yet despite all of these priceless ecological, economic, social and health benefits, global deforestation continues at the rate of about 32 million acres per year, equivalent to 10-20 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions contributing to climate change. Check out my article and photo essay for Pacific Standard to learn more about forests, especially for ways you can get involved in helping to protect and restore them.

Global CO2 emissions flat for 3d year in a row

U.S. emissions at 1992 level, according to IEA report

The Craig Station power plant in northwest Colorado pollutes lakes in Rocky Mountain National Park. @bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

Carbon dioxide emissions from the world’s biggest economies — the U.S. and China — dropped in 2016 and didn’t grow in Europe, showing that economic growth can occur without an increase in heat-trapping pollution, according to the latest emissions report from the International Energy Agency.

Despite the slowdown in emissions from the power sector, CO2 levels are still climbing at a record rate, though, according to scientists who recently released a report showing that concentrations of the heat-trapping greenhouse gas increased 3 parts per million for the second year in a row. The concentration is now above 400 ppm, more than 43 percent more than pre-industrial levels. Continue reading “Global CO2 emissions flat for 3d year in a row”

Atmospheric CO2 surges again in 2016

Even with fossil fuel emissions starting to level off, greenhouse gases are increasing

CO2 levels are stairstepping to new record highs.

Staff Report

Despite the good intentions of the 134 countries that have ratified the Paris climate agreement to cut greenhouse gas emissions, the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere is still increasing at a record pace. For the second year in a row, instruments at  NOAA’s Mauna Loa Baseline Atmospheric Observatory showed CO2 increasing by 3 parts per million in 2016.

The two-year, 6-ppm surge between 2015 and 2017 is unprecedented in the observatory’s 59-year record and marked the fifth year in a row that CO2 increased by 2 ppm or more, according to Pieter Tans, lead scientist of NOAA’s Global Greenhouse Gas Reference Network. Continue reading “Atmospheric CO2 surges again in 2016”