Tag: extreme weather

Global warming intensified Colorado’s deadly 2013 floods

A NOAA map shows the area around Boulder with more than 15 inches of rain during the deadly Sept. 2013 rainstorm.

Detailed modeling helps project how climate change will alter extreme weather

Staff Report

Global warming likely boosted rainfall during Colorado’s deadly 2013 floods by 30 percent, according to new research. The September storms killed nine people and destroyed or damaged about 900 homes. Altogether, some spots saw more than 17 inches of rain, sending the South Platte River to a record high level. Continue reading “Global warming intensified Colorado’s deadly 2013 floods”

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Global warming will devastate marginal farming areas

Southwest will be hit especially hard

Climate scientists have a pretty good understanding of how global warming will affect agriculture in different parts of the world. Is anybody listening? @bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

Most agriculture in the southwestern U.S. is already marginal, possible only because U.S. taxpayers support cheap water for questionable crops. And because of global warming, the outlook is grim as the region continues to warm and dry.

By 2050, Arizona cotton production will drop to less than 10 percent of the crop yield under optimal irrigation conditions, a new MIT study projects. Similarly, maize grown in Utah, now only yielding 40 percent of the optimal expected yield, will decrease to 10 percent with further climate-driven water deficits. Continue reading “Global warming will devastate marginal farming areas”

Climate extremes have big effect on wheat yields

New index helps project changes

Grain crops are very vulnerable to climate change impacts. @bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

Farmers have known it for generations that heatwaves, drought and extreme rain are a bad recipe for growing wheat, and now scientists have quantified those impacts. Heat stress, combined with drought or excessive rain is responsible for about 40 percent of the changes in wheat yields from one year to another.

That’s bad news in a world that’s expecting extreme weather to intensify in the coming decades, but at least the stress index developed scientists with the European Joint Research Centre will help communities plan ahead and ameliorate at least some climate change impacts. Continue reading “Climate extremes have big effect on wheat yields”

Global warming drives more extreme rainfall

Summer rainstorm in the Rocky Mountains. @bberwyn photo.

New study pinpoints regional patterns in changes

Staff Report

Basic physics tells us a warmer atmosphere can hold more moisture, and that, at some point, that moisture will condense and fall as rain. That’s why climate scientists are certain that global warming will lead to more extreme rainfall, as has already been documented in various parts of the world the past few decades.

A new study now helps quantify the impact of warming and also reveals regional patterns that will help people prepare. According to the researchers with MIT and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, the most extreme rain events in most regions of the world will increase in intensity by 3 to 15 percent, depending on region, for every degree Celsius that the planet warms. Continue reading “Global warming drives more extreme rainfall”

Billion dollar weather disasters piling up in early 2017

Freezes, fires and tornadoes caused significant regional economic harm in Jan.-March

Temperatures were well above average across two-thirds of the U.S. in March.

By Bob Berwyn

Tornadoes, wildfires, and blizzards during the second-warmest winter on record for the U.S. killed 37 people and caused an estimated $5.8 billion dollars in damage, according to the latest monthly update from federal climate trackers at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

It was the first time there were five billion-dollar extreme weather events during the January to March period, the National Centers for Environmental Information said in the state of the climate report released Thursday. The March 6-8 tornado outbreak in the Midwest was the costliest, at $1.5 billion. The damage from California rainstorms Feb. 8-22 amounted to $1 billion, the report says. Continue reading “Billion dollar weather disasters piling up in early 2017”

How will the melting Arctic affect European weather?

Study eyes impacts to North Atlantic Oscillation

How will the Arctic meltdown affect weather in the British Isles?
How will the Arctic meltdown affect weather in the British Isles? Photo courtesy UK Met Office.

Staff Report

The loss of Arctic sea ice may not lead directly to an increase in cold weather extremes in Europe, according to scientists who studied the links between Arctic changes and mid-latitude weather. In the study, scientists with the University of Exeter found that dwindling sea ice does affect the  North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) weather phenomenon, which affects winter weather conditions in Northern Europe, in places such as the UK, Scandinavia and the Baltic states. Continue reading “How will the melting Arctic affect European weather?”

USGS study shows that extreme rainstorms are critical for groundwater recharge in the West

‘Without them, groundwater resources become depleted’

Raindrops ... @bberwyn photo.
Raindrops … @bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

Extreme precipitation events that cause severe flooding, loss of life and property damage aren’t exactly at the top of the weather wish list for most people. But it turns out they play a key role in replenishing underground aquifers in the western U.S.

The importance of groundwater will continue to grow in the years ahead — an era of population growth and climate disruption, so understanding the connection between big storms and groundwater recharge is critical, according to U.S. Geological Survey and Bureau of Reclamation scientists who have released a new study analyzing large, multi-year, quasi-decadal groundwater recharge events in the northern Utah portion of the Great Basin from 1960 to 2013.

They evaluated groundwater levels and climate information and identified five large recharge events with a frequency of about 11 to 13 years. Findings show these events provide a significant amount of groundwater recharge and storage across the northern Great Basin, causing water levels to rise in aquifers. Continue reading “USGS study shows that extreme rainstorms are critical for groundwater recharge in the West”