Tag: Environment

Endangered Indiana bats face twin threat from wind turbines and white-nose syndrome

Indiana bats hibernating in a cave. PHOTO COURTESY USGS/ANDREW KING.
Indiana bats hibernating in a cave. PHOTO COURTESY USGS/ANDREW KING.

Small hibernating bat colonies need protection to prevent extinction

Staff Report

Between collisions with wind turbines and deadly white-nose syndrome, endangered Indiana bats may not have much of a chance of recovering, according to a recently published U.S. Geological Survey study.

The researchers used a scientific model to compare how wind turbine mortality and WNS may singly and then together affect Indiana bat population dynamics throughout the species’ U.S. range. Continue reading “Endangered Indiana bats face twin threat from wind turbines and white-nose syndrome”

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Can wave power help de-carbonize the world?

Planned test site in Oregon could help answer the question, but will it survive Trump?

A standing wave in the Blue River at peak runoff, July 2011.
Can waves help power the world without carbon? @bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

All eyes are on wind and solar these days, and rightly so, but ocean waves may play an even bigger role in humanity’s efforts to decarbonize energy production. Scientists and engineers in the Pacific Northwest may get a chance to show how that can happen with a new wave energy test facility in Newport, Oregon.

Last month, Oregon State University’s Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center today was awarded up to $40 million from the U.S. Department of Energy for the  Pacific Marine Energy Center South Energy Test Site, which should be operational by 2020. It will be able to test wave energy “converters” that harness the energy of ocean waves and turn it into electricity. Companies around the world are already anticipating construction of the new facility to test and perfect their technologies, OSU officials say. Continue reading “Can wave power help de-carbonize the world?”

Feds eye grizzly reintroduction in North Cascades

Draft plan posted for public comment

A grizzly boar on the Brooks River in Alaska. Photo by Kim Fenske.
A grizzly boar on the Brooks River in Alaska. Photo by Kim Fenske.
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Re-establishing a self-sustaining population of grizzlies in the North Cascades ecosystem could help reach overall recovery goals for the predators, which have been on the endangered species list since 1975.

Staff Report

Federal biologists say they can boost the population of grizzly bears in the North Cascades ecosystem by relocating the predators from other areas. The National Park Service and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service this week released a draft plan (open for public comment), for increasing the total number of bears in the region to 200. Bt current estimates, only about 10 remain, too small a population to sustain itself. According to the draft plan, grizzly bears could be relocated from either northwestern Montana or south-central British Columbia.

“We’re happy to see the agencies taking a step in the right direction to restore grizzly bears to the North Cascades,” said Andrea Santarsiere, a senior attorney with the Center for Biological Diversity. “Without a helping hand, grizzly bears are likely to disappear from the Pacific Northwest.” Continue reading “Feds eye grizzly reintroduction in North Cascades”

EPA backs away from protecting pollinators

Biologists have been trying to figure out why bee colonies are in decline, and the latest research is pointing directly to pesticides as the main cause. Click the pic to learn more.
Bees are taking a big hit from neonicotinoid pesticides, and the EPA isn’t going to be much help. @bberwyn photo.

Proposed restrictions become voluntary guidelines

Staff Report

Multiple studies have shown that neonicotinoid pesticides are having all sorts of negative impacts on bees, from killing their brain cells, to causing queen bees to lay fewer eggs. Now, the EPA has acknowledged that science, but is still failing to take action to protect critical pollinators, according to the Center for Biological Diversity.

The nonprofit watchdog group says the EPA is giving in to industry pressure by failing to restrict use of the dangerous pesticides, “despite broad evidence of their well-established role in alarming declines of pollinators.” Continue reading “EPA backs away from protecting pollinators”

Sunday set: Meltdown

Global sea ice at record low

@bberwyn photos
It’s hard to really get your head around what it means that the Arctic ice cap is literally melting away, and perhaps even harder to imagine that massive tracts of Antarctic ice are also giving way to global warming. But the science is pretty clear: During other epochs of Earth’s geological history, at times when there were similar global temperatures and about the same amount of CO2 in the atmosphere, so much ice melted that sea level was at least 20 feet higher than today. Today’s Earth — our Earth — seems to be responding the same way. For all of December, the extent of global sea ice has set record lows every single day.  The Arctic meltdown is well documented by more than 100 years of data. Around the South Pole, more and more studies are showing warm layers of water melting large coastal slabs of ice that hold back the almost unimaginable masses of ice on the Antarctic continent. The images in this set are just snapshots, but what’s happening out there is very real. Take #climateaction now.

Northeastern U.S. warming much faster than global average

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Some parts of the U.S. are warming much faster than the global average.

Study highlights regional climate change hotpsots

By Bob Berwyn

Not all global warming is equal, according to scientists who just published new research on how some areas will warm much faster than others. The study, published in PLOS ONE, shows that the northeastern U.S. is already heating up much faster than the global average and will hit the 2 degree Celsius mark about 20 years before the global average climbs to that level.

“Our study shows that the northeast United States is one of those regions where warming will proceed very rapidly, so that if and when the global target is reached, we will already be experiencing much higher temperatures, with all of the related ecological, hydrological and agricultural consequences,” said Raymond Bradley, a geoscientist at the Northeast Climate Science Center (NECSC) at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. “With the signing of the Paris Agreement to try and limit greenhouse gas emissions, many people have been lulled into a false sense of security, thinking that the 2-degrees C target is somehow a ‘safe’ limit for climate change.” Continue reading “Northeastern U.S. warming much faster than global average”

GOP tries to shield anti-wolf bill from legal review

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When will the wolf battles end? Photo by USFWS.

Republicans apparently willing to use authoritarian tools in their war on the environment

By Bob Berwyn

The GOP-dominated Congress is flexing its political muscle with legislation that would override the Endangered Species Act by removing federal protection for wolves in the Great Lakes region and Wyoming, making the animals vulnerable to state-regulated trophy hunting and trapping.

This isn’t the first time anti-environmental lawmakers have tried this, but what is new is that, this time, they’re trying to encroach on the longstanding system of checks and balances by passing a law that would prevent new judicial review. Continue reading “GOP tries to shield anti-wolf bill from legal review”