Tag: climate change

Bye bye Bluebells?

Bluebell with raindrops throug
Bluebell with raindrops. @bberwyn photo.

Global warming affects spring wildflower blooms

Staff Report

Data gathered by citizen scientists suggests that bluebells and some other spring wildflowers are slipping out of synch with seasonal temperature cycles.  A study published this week in Global Change Biology looked at 22 species of plants; all of them were found to be responding to warming temperatures in spring, by changing when their leaves or flowers emerged.

The data come from  hundreds of thousands of observations by amateur enthusiasts submitted to the Woodland Trust’s Nature’s Calendar project. The findings show some are liable to adapt less well than others to rising temperatures, which can impact on their chances to grow and reproduce. Continue reading “Bye bye Bluebells?”

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Climate trackers say Jan. 2017 was the 2d-warmest on record

European Climate Change Service report highlights unusually warm Arctic

month_1_2017_plot_2_brandedWarmer than average temperatures prevailed around the globe in January 2017.

Staff Report

January 2017 will go down in the books as Earth’s second-warmest January on record, just 0.17 degrees cooler than last year, according to the monthly update from the European Climate Change Service. According to the bulletin, January was 0.55 degrees warmer than the 1981-2010 average, with hotspots especially across Southern Hemisphere continents, as well as the southeastern U.S.

In the Northern Hemisphere, Europe was about 1 degree Celsius cooler the 1981-2010 January average, similar to 2016. Other cooler-than-average areas included parts of the western USA and Canada, northern Greenland, North Africa, parts of Siberia, southern Africa, north-western Australia and much of the Antarctic plateau. Continue reading “Climate trackers say Jan. 2017 was the 2d-warmest on record”

Coastal wetlands seen as key piece of global carbon cycle

Long-term carbon storage in soil crucial to climate mitigation

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Mangrove forests store huge amounts of carbon. @bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

Coastal wetlands like mangrove forests, seagrass meadows and tidal marshes play a key role in the global carbon cycle, serving as effective long-term reservoirs for so-called blue carbon. Their role is so important they should be considered in global climate change mitigation strategies, according to a new study published last week n the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment.

According to the researchers, coastal wetland areas are easier for governments to manage compared with ecosystems in international waters, further adding to the strategic value of coastal wetlands in the fight against climate change. Continue reading “Coastal wetlands seen as key piece of global carbon cycle”

Sunday set: Mountain love

Go higher …


Time revisit a couple of favorite mountains scenes in the Summit Voice archives, and time to remember that global warming is going alter some mountain landscapes irrevocably, not it the far distant future, but within a few decades. For example, a new study shows how warming will alter basic soil chemistry by speeding up microbial activity and shifting the balance of key nutrients. This will displace some plants and probably eliminate others. And as much as we appreciate forested landscapes, climate change is driving the spread of tree-killing insects, as shown by the latest aerial survey of Colorado forests. Check out more environmental and nature photography from Summit Voice at our online gallery, or visit the Sunday Set archives.

What’s driving the collapse of Antarctic ice shelves?

New CSU study eyes regional climate cycle as one factor

Disintegration of ice shelves in East Antarctica could result in a spiraling increase in sea levels. PHOTO BY BOB BERWYN.
Disintegration of ice shelves in East Antarctica has been linked with a regional climate pattern and could result in a spiraling increase in sea levels. @bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

This year’s rapid loss of sea ice around Antarctica may make the floating ice shelves along the coast of the continent even more vulnerable to collapse, and a  Hemisphere climate cycle known as the Southern Annular Mode is probably a factor in the equation.

Just during the past 50 years, more than 28,000 square kilometers of ice shelves have crumbled along the Antarctic Peninsula, and one of the last remaining large ice shelves looks set to shed another piece about as large as Delaware. A new study led by Colorado State University scientists offers some new information on climate processes in the region. Continue reading “What’s driving the collapse of Antarctic ice shelves?”

It’s official — 2016 is the warmest year on record

Climate data show steady pace of global warming

amaps
A NASA map shows the pattern of global warming in 2016.

Staff Report

For the third year in a row, the average global temperature climbed to a new record in 2016, reaching 1.69 degrees Fahrenheit above the 20th century average, according to the most recent state of the climate report from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

During a conference announcing the new data, federal scientists said they can confidently  determine that Earth is now in its warmest era since about 125,000 years ago, during a break between ice ages, and there’s no sign that the warmup will stop anytime soon. Continue reading “It’s official — 2016 is the warmest year on record”

Ocean acidification to hit key fisheries

Study projects 55 percent increase in acidity in next 50 years

ocean
The world’s oceans are in big trouble. @bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

There’s no stopping ocean acidification without stopping CO2 emissions, and that’s bad news for many marine species, including Dungeness crabs, according to new new research published in the journal Global Change Biology.

Tiny shell-forming organisms like pteropods and copepods are vulnerable to acidification, but will likely experience only a slight overall decline because they are prolific enough to offset much of the impact, the study found. But those impacts will cascade through ocean ecosystems to affect larger animals like crabs, that will suffer as their food sources decline. Dungeness crab fisheries are valued at about $220 million annually, and may face a strong downturn over the next 50 years. Continue reading “Ocean acidification to hit key fisheries”