Tag: climate change

Still so much confusion about weather versus climate

Big sky.
If it’s hot, it’s global warming, but if not … @bberwyn photo.

Study finds climate change beliefs in the U.S. linked with personal weather experiences

Staff Report

Meteorologists, climate scientists and journalists have apparently failed to convey the message that global climate change and local day-to-day weather conditions are two separate things. A study published this week suggests that Americans’ beliefs about global warming are based on how often they personally experience weather-related events.

One of the paper’s co-authors explained the findings in a press release.

“One of the greatest challenges to communicating scientific findings about climate change is the cognitive disconnect between local and global events,” said Michael Mann, associate professor of geography at George Washington University. “It is easy to assume that what you experience at home must be happening elsewhere.” Continue reading “Still so much confusion about weather versus climate”

2016 headed for new global temperature record

November ends up as 5th-warmes on record

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November was marked by contrasts between North America and Eurasia. Map courtesy NASA.

Staff Report

November’s average global temperature was 1.31 degrees Fahrenheit above the 20th century average, making it the fifth-warmest November on record. According to the latest global state of the climate report from the National Centers for Environmental Information, it was cooler than last year’s record by 0.41 degrees Fahrenheit, but 0.09 degrees warmer than the average for the 21st century.

According to the report, warmer-than-average conditions prevailed across most of the globe’s land areas, with record warmth in parts of central and southeastern Canada, where temperatures were at least 9 degrees Fahrenheit above the 1981–2010 average in many places. Other warm regions included the far northern tier of the United States along with a portion of the southwest, parts of western and southern Mexico, sections of eastern and west central Africa, and regions of some southeastern Asia island nations. Continue reading “2016 headed for new global temperature record”

Warm ocean melting East Antarctic ice from beneath

Time to re-adjust sea level rise estimates

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Time to make some new estimates for sea level rise. @bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

New measurements taken in the ocean near a massive East Antarctica ice sheet confirm that warm water is melting the ice from below. The new data will help scientists determine how fast the Totten Ice Shelf will melt. In all, it contains enough water to raise global sea level by 3.5 meters, according to a new study published last week in Science Advances.

Previous studies have suggested that  Antarctic ice shelvesare thinning because of warming ocean temperatures. The fastest melting, as well as an acceleration of glaciers, has been reported from the  Bellingshausen Sea and the Amundsen Sea, where much of the ice sheet rests on bedrock below sea level that deepens upstream. Continue reading “Warm ocean melting East Antarctic ice from beneath”

Opinion: Colorado, you are so fracked …

It’s all about the Mancos shale gas

Signs of oil and gas development are visible on a landscape level from 35,000 feet in the air.
Signs of oil and gas development are visible on a landscape level across western Colorado and eastern Utah from 35,000 feet in the air. @bberwyn photo.

By Bob Berwyn

If you think Colorado is getting fracked now, just wait a few more months. The state’s oil and gas producers are lining up with the rest of the fossil fuel industry to cash in on the incoming administration’s dark vision of carbon unleashed. In a press release issued this week, the West Slope Colorado Oil & Gas Association says it’s already planning a trip to Washington, D.C. to expedite approval of a natural gas pipeline across the western USA, leading to an export terminal at Coos Bay, Oregon.

The Canadian company proposing development of the project announced today it will reapply for a permit for the project with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission in the next few months.

But a pipeline won’t do any good if there is no place to load the gas aboard ships, and West Coast cities are determined to block new fossil fuel infrastructure, according to InsideClimate News, which reports that Portland is one of the latest cities to use local zoning powers to prevent construction of new major fossil fuel terminals and expansion of any existing facilities.

And according to the watchdog group Citizens Against LNG, the Jordan Cove Energy Project, L.P. also formally requested that its application for a Site Certificate for their South Dunes Power Plant be withdrawn from further consideration by the Oregon Energy Facility Siting Council and the Oregon Department of Energy. Without that power plant, there won’t any terminal at Coos Bay, activists say.

The idea, according to WSCOGA, is to develop Western Colorado’s vast Mancos Shale gas potential — an energy reserve among the largest natural gas resources in North America. According to the press release, natural gas producers in the Piceance Basin “have applauded Jordan Cove LNG’s decisive and speedy decision to pursue reapplication and approval of the most important energy infrastructure project in the Western United States.” Continue reading “Opinion: Colorado, you are so fracked …”

Autumn was exceptionally warm across the U.S.

Record and near-record readings from coast to coast

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All 48 contiguous states reported above average temperatures for the fall of 2016.

Staff Report

November 2016’s average temperature across the U.S. was 6.3 degrees Fahrenheit above the 20th century average, making it the second-warmest on record, behind 1999. According to the latest monthly update from the National Centers for Environmental Information, November is warming at a rate of 6.6 degrees Fahrenheit per century. Only January has been warming faster, at a rate of 10.5 degrees Fahrenheit per century.

Idaho, North Dakota and Washington were record warm in November. Every state in the Lower 48 experienced an average temperature that above average. North Dakota’s average temperature was 12.8 degrees above normal, nearly 2 degrees above the previous record set in 1999. In the West, 15 states reported their second or third warmest November reading on record. Continue reading “Autumn was exceptionally warm across the U.S.”

Climate scientists track young, thin Arctic ice

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Sea ice mingles with icebergs off the coast of Greenland during the peak of the 2015 melt season. @bberwyn photo.

Remarkable changes with huge planetary implications

Staff Report

Earth’s climate control system — the Arctic — is changing so fast that researchers are having a hard time keeping up. In an effort to understand how the region is shifting toward a new state, a team of scientists spent nearly six months examining the younger and thinner sea ice that’s become ubiquitous in the past few years. They discussed their findings this week at the fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union in San Francisco.

“Many things we experienced took us by surprise,” said Mats Granskog, a research scientist at the Norwegian Polar Institute and chief scientist of the Norwegian young sea ICE, or N-ICE2015 project. “We saw that the new Arctic, with much thinner sea ice only three to four feet thick, functions much differently from the Arctic we knew only 20 years ago, when the ice was much thicker.”

One of the biggest concerns is that the reduced sea-ice coverage and thickness will lead to even more melting, the so-called Arctic amplification. Most of the solar energy that reaches Arctic snow and sea ice gets reflected back into space. But when the snow and ice is replaced by darker, open water, most of the energy gets absorbed and in turn helps melt more ice. Continue reading “Climate scientists track young, thin Arctic ice”

At the nexus of climate change and invasive species

What happens when the trout streams warm?

A palm-size brook trout, caught in the Tenmile Creek drainage near Copper Mountain.
A palm-size brook trout, caught in the Tenmile Creek drainage near Copper Mountain. @bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

U.S. Geological Survey scientists have completed one of the first experimental studies to explore links between climate change and invasive species, specifically how  brook trout and brown trout interact with rising stream temperatures. They found that non-native browns limit the ability of brook trout to use warmer water temperatures, By contrast, removin of browns brook trouts’ reach into warmer waters.

Brookies are freshwater fish native to eastern North America and threatened by climate change because of their requirement for cold stream temperatures. Brown trout are native to Europe and have been introduced all around North America. Continue reading “At the nexus of climate change and invasive species”