Tag: climate change

EPA stops work on airline emissions standards

Air travel accounts for one of the fastest growing sources of greenhouse gas pollution. @bberwyn photo.

Agency’s move could violate federal environmental laws

Staff Report

A little more than a year after determining that greenhouse gas emissions from aircraft are a threat to public health, the EPA has stopped working on developing new standards for the air industry.

That’s not surprising, given that the Trump administration has sought to undermine nearly every rule set to limit heat-trapping pollution, but environmental advocates with the Center for Biological Diversity want to know more about the latest step backward by the EPA. Continue reading “EPA stops work on airline emissions standards”

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Can volcanoes overheat the Earth?

A geyser in Iceland is part of the Central Atlantic rift system where volcanic activity may have caused an extreme global warmup about 56 million years ago. @bberwyn photo.

Study says ancient extreme global warming event was caused by C02 buildup from massive eruptions

Staff Report

The role of volcanoes on Earth’s climate is complex. It’s well known that aerosol particles from eruptions like Mt. St. Helens can cool temperatures by blocking a small part of the sun’s energy, but a new study suggests that an extreme global warming event about 56 million years ago was caused by massive volcanic C02 emissions.

The research, led by the University of Southampton found evidence that atmospheric C02 doubled within a relatively short period of time, on the geological scale, resulting in a global temperature spike that drove mass extinctions. The eruptions happened during formation of the Atlantic Ocean, according to the study published in the journal Nature. Continue reading “Can volcanoes overheat the Earth?”

Eastern U.S. most vulnerable to future harmful algal blooms

New modeling shows where global warming will increase cyanobacteria

Blue-green algae that sometimes produce toxins thrive as global warming heats up lakes, ponds and reservoirs. @bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

Scientists say it’s all but certain that global warming will increase potentially threatening outbreaks of freshwater algae that can produce toxins dangerous to people and animals.

A team lead by Tufts University researcher Steven C. Chapra has developed a modeling framework showing harmful algal blooms will increase the most in the northeastern region of the U.S. but that the biggest economic impact will be felt in the Southeast, where waters important for recreation will probably take a big hit.

The research, published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, is part of larger, ongoing efforts among scientists to quantify and monetize the degree to which climate change will impact and damage various U.S. sectors. Continue reading “Eastern U.S. most vulnerable to future harmful algal blooms”

We’re losing the global warming poker game

Greenhouse gases tilt odds toward record warmth

June 2017 was another near-record warm month around the globe.

Staff Report

It’s highly unlikely Earth would have seen a three-year run of record global temperatures without its blanket of human-caused greenhouse gases, scientists concluded in a new study that tried to pin down the relationship between record warmth and human-caused global warming.

Without the warming effect of carbon dioxide, methane and other heat-trapping pollutants, there’s only a 0.03 percent chance that there would be three consecutive years of record temperatures; when the warming effects of greenhouse gases are added into the equatio, the odds of three consecutive record-breaking years happening any time since 2000 rises to as high as 50 percent, according to the new study. Continue reading “We’re losing the global warming poker game”

Study documents shrinking Alaska snow season

Winter comes later, spring sooner along the North Slope of AK

A January 2011 image from the NASA Earth Observatory library shows Alaska completely covered with snow.

Staff Report

The snow season is getting shorter in one of the coldest parts of the U.S. On Alaska’s North Slope, snow is piling up later in the fall and melts earlier in the spring, climate change that is having consequences for communities and ecosystems. Continue reading “Study documents shrinking Alaska snow season”

Sunday set: Bugs on blooms

In the woods …

It’s mid-summer, so all the bugs and plant are engaged in their eternal dance of life, with flowers blooming and pollinators doing their thing, all setting the stage for the next act of the play. But as you may or may not know, global warming has thrown many of these cycles out synch. Some of the best long-term research on this topic comes from the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory in Crested Butte, where scientists have shown how the shifting seasons are affecting butterflies and hummingbirds.

And when it comes to climate change, nature is kind of the opposite of Las Vegas. What happens there doesn’t stay there. All of nature is interconnected, so you can be sure that impacts to one part of the ecosystem will ripple through all the other parts eventually. The cycle of blooming plants and pollinating insects is so critical that there is actually a potential threat to food systems for humans. That doesn’t mean that we might not be able to address some of those challenges with technology or other innovations, but that’s bound to be expensive. It’s probably best to try and maintain natural ecosystem functions as best as we can by limiting global warming. And even if we do that right away, we’re still going to see some long-term impacts based on the warming that’s already locked into the climate system.

Is global warming changing the Southwest monsoon?

Study shows more intense but less frequent storms

Monsoon precipitation is an important part of the water cycle in the dry western half of the U.S. so climate scientists are trying to figure out global warming will affect the pattern. @bberwyn photo.

An international research team says monsoon storms in the Southwest have become less frequent but more intense, bringing more extreme wind and rain to central and southwestern Arizona than just a few decades ago.

The study, led by scientists with the University of Arizona, compared precipitation records from 1950 to 1970 with data from the 1991-2010 period to verify their climate model, scaled down to capture changes at a resolution of 1.5 square miles. At that level of detail the changes over time became apparent, while models using a 10 square mile grid aren’t able to accurately recreate the precipitation trends. Continue reading “Is global warming changing the Southwest monsoon?”