Tag: climate change

Report offers cold, hard truth about global warming

Scientists say Paris deal is not nearly enough to curb harmful global warming

amaps
The average global temperature has spiked to dramatic new highs in the past few months.

By Bob Berwyn

The Paris climate agreement will likely be triggered into force within the next few weeks, which marks the beginning — not the end — of an intense effort to try and cap global warming before the planet is overwhelmed by heatwaves, droughts and super storms.

Governments and citizens need to rapidly ramp up efforts to cut greenhouse gas emissions, a group of scientists said this week, releasing a new report showing that the climate pledges made toward the Paris agreement won’t do the trick. Continue reading “Report offers cold, hard truth about global warming”

How long can the oceans soak up CO2?

What’s the tipping point?

Researchers examine ocean acidification rates

Staff Report

For now, the world’s oceans are sucking up so much carbon dioxide that it’s helping to slow the rate of global warming. But that’s expected to change in the future, researchers warned after taking a detailed look at the rate of ocean acidification in the northeast Pacific Ocean. Continue reading “How long can the oceans soak up CO2?”

Antarctic krill could take a big global warming hit

A feeding penguin near the Antarctic Peninsula. @bberwyn photo.

Study projects major loss in habitat

Staff Report

Changes in ocean temperatures and sea ice formation around Antarctica could imperil the region’s krill — tiny crustaceans that are at the base of the food chain. Scientists say they’ve already documented a big drop in krill populations since the 1970s. Losing more krill would reduce the amount of food available for whales, penguins, seals, squid, fish and other marine life.

A new study published online in Geophysical Research Letters says up to 80 percent of suitable krill habitat could disappear by 2100. The research examines the effects of a warmer ocean and a decline in sea ice on these small crustaceans, said Andrea Piñones, a marine scientist at Center for Advance Studies in Arid Zones (Centro de Estudios Avanzados en Zonas Aridas) in Coquimbo, Chile, and lead author of the study. Continue reading “Antarctic krill could take a big global warming hit”

Sunday set: Mountain time!

Around the Grossglockner …

Our reporting for the global warming in the Alps project took us to the high country around Austria’s highest peak, the Grossglockner, late last week, where we saw firsthand how the once mighty glaciers have dwindled to remnant shards of ice in the past few decades, with uncertain consequences for ecosystems below. The mountain valleys are still lush green in the Austrian high country, but there are great concerns that the meltdown could affect aquatic life in the streams below the glaciers, not to mention hydropower production, one of Austria’s main sources of renewable energy.

Climate: 3d-warmest year-to-date for U.S.

Summer temps well above normal across U.S.
Summer temps well above normal across U.S.

Every state was warmer than average for the summer

Staff Report

This year’s meteorological summer in the contiguous U.S. (June-August) will go down in the climate annals as the fifth-warmest on record, at 2.8 degrees Fahrenheit above the 20th century average.

The year-to-date is the third-warmest on record, with Alaska on pace for a record-warm year after eight months, according to NOAA’s monthly State of the Climate summary, available here. August was the 17-warmest on record, with record warmth in the Northeast, and below average temperatures in the Southwest.

After record rain storms in parts of the Midwest and along the Gulf Coast, August ended up as the second wettest on record.

For the summer, according to NOAA, every state across the contiguous U.S., had a statewide temperature that was above average. Twenty-nine states across the West and in the East were much warmer than average for the summer. California, Connecticut and Rhode Island each had their warmest summer on record.

Alaska observed its second warmest summer in its 92-year record at 53.6°F, 3.0°F above average. Only the summer of 2004 was warmer with a statewide temperature value of 55.9°F. Several locations across the state were record warm including Anchorage, Kenai, King Salmon and Yakutat.

The full report will be available Sept. 13 here.

 

Climate trackers say August was record-warm globally

Streak of record global heat continues

Surface air temperature anomaly for August 2016 relative to the August average for the period 1981-2010. Source: ERA-Interim.
Surface air temperature anomaly for August 2016 relative to the August average for the period 1981-2010. Source: ERA-Interim.

Staff Report

August 2016 is down in the global climate annals as the warmest August on record and the second-warmest month of all time, just behind July. According to Copernicus, Europe’s earth observation program, August’s global average temperature was 0.62 degrees Celsius above the 1981-2010 average, and 0.17 degrees Celsius warmer than the previous August record, set in 2015.

According to the Copernicus update, the global temperature anomaly crested in February, coinciding with the peak of ocean-warming El Niño conditions, dropped from March to June, but spiked again during July and August. Each month from August 2015 onward has been the warmest on record for that particular month. Continue reading “Climate trackers say August was record-warm globally”

Climate change may be factor in spread of tree fungus

Signs of hope? A single Douglas-fir grows at the base of the clearcut area along Swan Mountain Road. It'll be interesting to watch the area during the next few years to see how it regenerates.
Global warming may be promoting growth of a tree-damaging fungus in the Pacific Northwest. @bberwyn photo.

Commercially valuable tree stands take hit in Pacific Northwest

Staff Report

Global warming may be a factor in the spread of a fungus affecting valuable Douglas fir forests in the Pacific Northwest. Needle cast disease has recently spread across 590,000 acres in Oregon,  quadrupling since the start of surveys in 1996. The annual economic loss has been estimated at $128 million.

“The correlation between disease severity and climate factors, such as spring moisture and warm winter temperatures, raises the question of a link between disease expansion and climate change,” said  researcher Gabriela Ritokova. “Those factors, in combination with lots of Douglas fir and with large springtime fungal spore production, have us where we are now.” Continue reading “Climate change may be factor in spread of tree fungus”