Tag: biodiversity

Biodiversity: Frog-killing fungus turns up in Africa

boreal toad
The frog-killing chytrid fungus, which has all but wiped out species like boreal toads, has now been found in Africa. @bberwyn photo.

Researchers track chytrid in mountains of Cameroon

Staff Report

Africa’s frogs may also be succumbing to the chyrid fungus that has wiped out species around the world, researchers reported this week in the journal PLOS ONE.

Tracking frogs on Cameroon’s Mount Oku and Mount Manengouba over a span of more than 12 years, University of Florida herpetologist David Blackburn and colleagues at the Museum für Naturkunde in Berlin have linked declines of at least five frog species linked with chytrid — possibly exacerbated by habitat destruction, pollution and climate change. Continue reading “Biodiversity: Frog-killing fungus turns up in Africa”

Environment: Can dams be operated without killing rivers?

Glen Canyon Dam. Image courtesy NASA Earth Observatory.
Glen Canyon Dam. Image courtesy NASA Earth Observatory.

New study eyes impacts to aquatic insects

Staff Report

Using a vast sample of data collected in a citizen science project, researchers say they’ve been able to discern how hydropeaking affects aquatic insects that form the base of river food chains. The information could help resource managers develop alternative hydropower practices that aren’t as harmful to ecosystems, according to a new study published in the journal BioScience.

Hydropeaking refers to the practice of increasing river flows at times of peak demand, generally during the day. This study shows how abrupt water level changes affect aquatic insects in every stage of life. The research was done by scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey, Oregon State University, Utah State University and Idaho State University. Continue reading “Environment: Can dams be operated without killing rivers?”

Wildlife: Court settlement compels feds to complete recovery plan for Mexican gray wolves in the Southwest

Mexican gray wolfWolf advocates hope for more releases of captive-bred wolves

Staff Report

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service this week agreed to prepare a recovery plan for Mexican gray wolves by 2017. The court settlement will compel the federal agency to finally meet its legal obligation to ensure that the wolves can establish a healthy, sustainable population. The settlement may speed up the slow-going conservation and recovery effort.

The settlement came in response to a lawsuit filed by a coalition of wolf-conservation groups, environmental organizations and a retired federal wolf biologist. Less than 100 Mexican gray wolves exist in the wild, making it one of the most endangered mammals in North America. The settlement follows a September 2015 ruling by a federal judge in Tucson that rejected the government’s effort to dismiss the case.

The recovery effort has long been mired in politics, with conservative Republican lawmakers setting roadblocks at every turn, pressuring the USFWS from the state level and trying to make end runs around the Endangered Species Act in Congress. Continue reading “Wildlife: Court settlement compels feds to complete recovery plan for Mexican gray wolves in the Southwest”

Milkweed shortage not the only reason for monarch decline

Monarch butterflies during migration. PHOTO COURTESY GENE NEIMINEN/USFWS.
Monarch butterflies at their overwintering grounds in Mexico. Photo courtesy Gene Neiminen/USFWS.

‘We have to get the science right’

Staff Report

The decline of milkweed may not be the main factor driving monarch butterflies toward oblivion, according to a new study by Cornell University scientists. Weather, habitat fragmentation and dwindling sources of nectar in the autumn are also critical, the new study reports.

“Thanks to years of data collected by the World Wildlife Fund and citizen-scientists across North America, we have pieced together the monarch life cycle to make inferences about what is impacting the butterflies,” said Cornell University Prof. Anurag Agrawal.

“Given the intense interest in monarch conservation, the blame being put on herbicide use and the national dialog about potentially listing monarchs under the endangered species act, we have to get the science right,” Agrawal said. Continue reading “Milkweed shortage not the only reason for monarch decline”

Watchdog group keeps door open for endangered species petitions

Two of the five lynx dens documented this spring by CDOW are in Summit County. PHOTO BY TANYA SHENK, COLORADO DIVISION OF WILDLIFE.
Two of the five lynx dens documented this spring by CDOW are in Summit County. Photo by Tanya Shenk/Colorado Division of Wildlife.

Feds dial back proposed regs that would have made it harder to seek endangered species protection

Staff Report

Many plants and animals that are protected as endangered species in the U.S. got that status because conservation groups — representing concerned citizens — petitioned the federal government. It’s a process that’s explicitly mandated by the Endangered Species Act, but that has led to serious frustration among government biocrats and various extractive industries that specialize in exploiting public land resources.

In an attempt to try and cripple citizen groups, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently proposed making the petitioning process much more difficult by requiring pre-clearance from state agencies and limiting petitions to a single species. All in all, the proposal was aimed at trying to avoid giving protection to species that need it. Continue reading “Watchdog group keeps door open for endangered species petitions”

Fishing still a big threat to loggerhead turtles in Mediterranean

More protection needed in feeding areas

Thousands of loggerhead sea turtles are dying in fishing nets in the southern and eastern Mediterranean. Photo via the Creative Common and Wikipedia.

Staff Report

Although key loggerhead sea turtle nesting areas around Cyprus, Greece and Turkey are relatively well-protected, the species is still vulnerable to small-scale fishing operations around Syria, Libya and Egypt and Tunisia. Thousand of the sea turtles, on the IUCN Red List, are killed each year when they travel to to those regions in search of food, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of Exeter. Continue reading “Fishing still a big threat to loggerhead turtles in Mediterranean”

Study says beefing up beaches with offshore sand can harm coastal ecosystems

Coastal managers may need to rethink beach replenishment

Pumping sand to replenish beaches may help tourism, but it can also kill off tiny but plentiful invertebrates at the base of the coastal ecosystem food web. @bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

Pumping sand ashore to beef up beaches appears to have long-lasting effects on coastal ecosystems, according to UC San Diego biologists who studied the issue across eight different beaches in San Diego County from Oceanside south to Imperial Beach.

Moving sand from offshore caused a twofold reduction in the abundance of certain invertebrate species living in the intertidal zone. That means less food for shorebirds and small fish that live near the shoreline, the scientists said. Continue reading “Study says beefing up beaches with offshore sand can harm coastal ecosystems”