Tag: Antarctica

Climate: Sea ice at both poles way below average

Antarctic sea ice retreat could set stage for ice shelf collapses

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Melting Greenland glaciers in September 2015, photographed from a passenger jet. @bberwyn photo.

Staff ReportMonths of above-average temperatures in the Arctic slowed the growth of sea ice formation to a crawl during the second half of October, the National Snow and Ice Data Center reported in its latest monthly update.The ice scientists said that, starting Oct. 20, Arctic sea ice started setting daily record lows for extent.  After mid-October, ice growth returned to near-average rates, but extent remained at record low levels through late October. Both sea surface and air temperatures have remained unusually high, extending from the surface high up into the atmosphere. Continue reading “Climate: Sea ice at both poles way below average”

Antarctic sea ice peaks near record-low extent

Australian scientists document early start to melt season

Yes, there is still lots of ice in Antarctica, but it's melting faster than ever. bberwyn photo.
Yes, there is still lots of ice in Antarctica, but it’s melting faster than ever. bberwyn photo.
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Antarctic sea ice extent was near a record low in late September and early October. Via NSIDC.

Staff Report

Australian scientists say Antarctic sea ice started its annual spring retreat early this year and has set new daily record lows for extent during late September — during the Austral spring, when Antarctic sea ice is at a maximum.

In a press release, the Antarctic Climate & Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre said the sea ice extent started its annual retreat early, just two years after  winter sea ice extent around Antarctica reached a new record high in September 2014, when it exceeded 20 million square kilometres for the first time since satellite measurements began in 1979.

This year, Antarctic sea ice began its annual spring retreat about four weeks earlier than average, after peaking at 18.5 million square kilometres on 28 August 2016, which was close to the lowest winter maximum on record.

Continue reading “Antarctic sea ice peaks near record-low extent”

Antarctic krill could take a big global warming hit

A feeding penguin near the Antarctic Peninsula. @bberwyn photo.

Study projects major loss in habitat

Staff Report

Changes in ocean temperatures and sea ice formation around Antarctica could imperil the region’s krill — tiny crustaceans that are at the base of the food chain. Scientists say they’ve already documented a big drop in krill populations since the 1970s. Losing more krill would reduce the amount of food available for whales, penguins, seals, squid, fish and other marine life.

A new study published online in Geophysical Research Letters says up to 80 percent of suitable krill habitat could disappear by 2100. The research examines the effects of a warmer ocean and a decline in sea ice on these small crustaceans, said Andrea Piñones, a marine scientist at Center for Advance Studies in Arid Zones (Centro de Estudios Avanzados en Zonas Aridas) in Coquimbo, Chile, and lead author of the study. Continue reading “Antarctic krill could take a big global warming hit”

Antarctic sea ice meltdown likely in a warming world

New study offers climate clues from most recent interglacial warm period

Antarctic sea ice
Antarctic sea ice is likely to decline dramatically in coming decades, which could lead to amplification of global warming in the southern hemisphere. @bberwyn photo.

By Bob Berwyn

The last time the Earth was as warm as today was about 128,000 years ago — and Antarctic sea ice extent was 65 percent smaller than it is now, according to British scientists who tracked past climate change in the region by studying ice core samples from that era.

That means Antarctic sea ice is on course to shrink dramatically in the decades and centuries ahead, said British Antarctic Survey scientist Max Holloway, who with a team of researchers analyzed oxygen isotopes in ice and air bubbles trapped for 128,000 years in the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. Continue reading “Antarctic sea ice meltdown likely in a warming world”

What’s the tipping point for Antarctica’s ice sheets?

New study suggests rapid meltdown during post-ice age warming

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How long will it take for Antarctica’s ice sheets to melt? @bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

After taking a close look at rocks from West Antarctica’s dramatic Ellsworth Mountains, climate researchers say there’s a chance that ice sheets in the region could melt quickly as the planet warms, potentially causing sea level to rise by  six to eight feet.

The new study, published in Nature Communications, took a close look at Antarctic climate change about 21,000 years ago during a period of warming after the coldest point of the most recent Ice Age. They found that  the West Antarctic Ice Sheet reached a tipping point, after which it thinned relatively quickly, losing 400m of thickness in 3,000 years. Continue reading “What’s the tipping point for Antarctica’s ice sheets?”

Warming oceans seen as main cause of glacier meltdown on the Antarctic Peninsula

Disintegration of ice shelves in East Antarctica could result in a spiraling increase in sea levels. PHOTO BY BOB BERWYN.
Warming ocean water is creeping up the continental shelf around the Antarctic Peninsula and melting glaciers in some parts of the region. @bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

British researchers say regional patterns of melting of glaciers on the Antarctic Peninsula are linked with warming oceans in the region. The Antarctic Peninsula is one of the biggest contributors to sea level rise, so the new finding will help pinpoint how fast and how high seas will rise in the decades ahead.

The southernmost glaciers flowing to the coast on the western side of the Peninsula are retreating rapidly, but those in the north show little change, the scientists said in a new study published last week in the journal Science. Since accurate measurements started in the 1940s, 94 percent of the 674 glaciers in the region have retreated. Continue reading “Warming oceans seen as main cause of glacier meltdown on the Antarctic Peninsula”

Eruption poses threat to huge penguin colony

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A chinstrap penguin on Deception Island. @bberwyn photo.

British Antarctic Survey scientists to monitor impacts of ash deposits

Staff Report

A volcanic eruption in the remote South Sandwich archipelago, near the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, may threaten the largest known colony of chinstrap penguins, according to scientists with the British Antarctic Survey who have been monitoring the eruption.

The Mt. Curry volcano on Zavodovski Island has been erupting since March, sending ash toward the penguin enclave. The uninhabited island is part of the British Overseas Territory of South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands. After reports of a 7.2 magnitude earthquake last month, researchers confirmed from satellite imagery that not one, but two volcanoes are erupting in the South Sandwich Islands — Mt. Curry on Zavodovski Island to the north of the archipelago and Mt. Sourabaya on Bristol Island to the south. Continue reading “Eruption poses threat to huge penguin colony”