Category: tourism

Environmental groups slam airline carbon-offset program

Can the air transport industry get a a grip on its greenhouse gas emissions? @bberwyn photo.

Voluntary program won’t help curb rapidly rising emissions, according to critics

Staff Report

Climate activists and conservation groups say a voluntary international airline carbon-trading scheme doesn’t go nearly far enough to curb greenhouse gas pollution.

Growth in the aviation sector puts the industry on track to triple emissions by 2050, but the new carbon-offset program won’t even take effect until 2021 and is slated to remain voluntary through 2027. According to the climate-action advocates, the deal, adopted by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), only covers about a quarter of total emissions and shifts the industry’s growing carbon debt on to third parties using what could be questionable carbon-offset credits. Continue reading “Environmental groups slam airline carbon-offset program”

Sunday set: High country


A late summer sojourn in the always sparkling mountain and lake country of the Salzkammergut yielded some good research material for our journalism project on climate change in the Alps and we had the opportunity to spend a night atop the Krippenstein, at an elevation of about 2,000 meters. One of the old alpine huts near the summit has been converted into a snazzy alpine lodge, The Lodge at Krippenstein, and there’s even a Colorado connection — seems Chris Davenport enjoyed a good ski session here a few years ago, and it turns out that Warren Miller has also filmed short segment in the area. The lodge is also operated as a climate friendly green business, and has won awards for its sustainable practices, and it is, of course, a great base camp for exploring this wonderful slice of the Alps.

All the pictures except one show lakes of the region, intricately tied to the Hallstattt Glacier in the upper right, which feeds the system, in turn a major headwaters tributary to the mighty Danube. The country’s glaciers are shriveling at an accelerated rate, as are it’s lakes, heating up at twice the global average. Earlier spring melt and longer, hotter summers have warmed streams, and larger rivers, even more, leading to increased fish disease and blooms of algae. Similar issues have been documented around the Alps and worldwide as clear global warming impacts. Learn more here.


Study eyes tourism threat to sustainable fisheries in Caribbean

A spiny lobster in the Florida Keys Marine Sanctuary. Photo courtesy NOAA.
A spiny lobster in the Florida Keys Marine Sanctuary. Photo courtesy NOAA.

Under-reporting of catches documented by nonprofit research group

Staff Report

The marine environment around some Caribbean islands is still threatened by unsustainable fishing, according to a new study that documents the under-reporting of catches in the Turks and Caicos Islands. According to the research, catches on the islands were 86 percent higher than what was reported to the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization, a finding with troubling implication for sustainable fisheries efforts.

The research team from the nonprofit Sea Around Us program says urgent policy action is needed to ensure the future sustainability of the fishing industry in this archipelago nation. The findings were published in open-access journal Frontiers in Marine Science. Continue reading “Study eyes tourism threat to sustainable fisheries in Caribbean”

Report eyes global warming threats to World Heritage sites

Floods, wildfires and rising seas put famed tourism areas at risk

Český Krumlov
Severe flooding due to global warming is seen as a threat to the Český Krumlov world heritage site in the Czech Republic, according to a new report. @bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

United Nations leaders say that famed World Heritage sites around the world are facing a significant threat from climate change. Increasing floods, melting glaciers and more wildfires are among the risks cited in a new report from UNESCO’s World Heritage Center.

“Globally, we need to better understand, monitor and address climate change threats to World Heritage sites,” said the center’s director, Mechtild Rössler. “As the report’s findings underscore, achieving the Paris Agreement’s goal of limiting global temperature rise to a level well below 2 degrees Celsius is vitally important to protecting our World Heritage for current and future generations.” Continue reading “Report eyes global warming threats to World Heritage sites”

Sunday set: From Above

‘Comin’ into London from over the Pole …’

A few more aerial shots left over in the Summit Voice archives, a little reminder (to myself) that airplane travel is a high-carbon activity. The world’s airlines are trying to grapple with the climate cost of their emissions, but so far, they have not made much progress, as you can read in this series of Summit Voice stories. Right now, the status is that an international air industry group is trying to develop its own self-policing scheme in order to avoid government regulations, but that effort is falling well short of what environmentalists want. The EPA is obligated under the Clean Air Act, to do something, but is moving much to slow. As a result, there’s a (big surprise) lawsuit to force the issue. Before any of that is resolved, air travelers always have the option of offsetting the carbon impacts of their own trip at Climate Care and other similar websites.

Morning photo: Spring in Vienna

Downtown Wien …

It doesn’t take long for Vienna to wake from its winter sleep. Just as soon as temperatures get into the 50s and 60s and the sun peaks out a little, cafes set up their outside tables where people huddle around even if they still have to wear a winter coat. In the parks and town squares, flowering trees add splashes of color to the neighborhood scene, and ping pong enthusiasts can strike up a friendly game in the park near the Flakturm. But keep your umbrella handy because April showers are not uncommon in the Danube metropolis.

Morning photo: Wien blüht!

Got blossoms?

In densely packed Vienna, open green spaces are cherished by residents and the city’s many parks and gardens are starting to come alive with spring blossoms. It’s easy to take trees for granted during the green days of summer, or in winter, when the branches are bare. But in spring, when they burst into their most colorful display, it’s time to stop and give thanks for the plants that help us survive on this planet. The city recognizes the environmental value of green spaces and actively works to encourage the creation of new gardens by offering subsidies for community gardens, green roofs and other activities that promote more plant life. You can find the best of Vienna’s gardens, and many other interesting tidbits of information about the city, with this online resource.