Category: Environment

Study IDs new parasite threat to honeybees

Detection could enable early intervention

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Pollinators are facing a broad range of threats, from pesticides and disease, to a new species of harmful parasites. @bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

There could be more trouble ahead for pollinators, as a new species of Varroa mite is developing the ability to parasitize European honeybees. That’s a new threat for insects already under pressure from pesticides, nutritional deficiencies and disease, according to a Purdue University study.

The scienists found some populations of Varroa jacobsoni mites are shifting from feeding and reproducing on Asian honeybees, their preferred host, to European honeybees, the primary species used for crop pollination and honey production worldwide. To bee researchers, it’s a grimly familiar story: V. destructor made the same host leap at least 60 years ago, spreading rapidly to become the most important global health threat to European honeybees. Continue reading “Study IDs new parasite threat to honeybees”

October ends up as 3d-warmest for Earth

Year-to-date still on record-breaking pace

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Record warmth has spanned the globe in 2016.

Staff Report

The average global temperature for October 2016 was 1.31 degrees Fahrenheit above the 20th century average, putting the month in a tie with 2003 for the third-warmest October on record.

Including 2016, the past three Octobers have been the three warmest in the historical record, but with the globe cooling down slightly from an El Niño heat surge, the monthly anomaly was the lowest deparature from average since Nov. 2014, according to the latest global monthly state of the climate report from the NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information. Continue reading “October ends up as 3d-warmest for Earth”

Can we #keepitintheground please?

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Roads and drill pads in the remote backcountry of eastern Utah. @bberwyn photo.

Conservation groups challenge planned fossil fuel leases on public lands in Colorado

Staff Report

Conservation groups are challenging the Bureau of Land Management’s plans to auction fossil fuel leases on 20,000 acres of public land in Colorado based on concerns about air and water pollution, and potential harm to imperiled species ­— including threatened Colorado River fish such as the Colorado pikeminnow and razorback sucker, and plant species such as the parachute beardtongue.

The administrative protest also says the BLM failed to consider climate impacts. If the leases are developed, it could result in 31. million tons of greenhouse gas emissions. Continue reading “Can we #keepitintheground please?”

Sunday set: Eyes wide open

Warning signs …

By Bob Berwyn

The Summit Voice Sunday Set is  set aside for scenic landscape shots or nature photo essays, which is usually a nice break from the previous week’s news. But today we have a public service announcement instead. Travel as we know it is threatened by a rising tide of right-wing, nationalistic populism around the world.

Living in the new political post-factual, post-truth era is going to require journalists to take their game to a much higher level if they want to regain credibility with readers who have come to distrust any source outside their immediate cybernews bubble. Travel writers could be a big part of the much-needed journalism revival. Nobody is in a better position to help show how interconnected the world has become in the past few decades. It’s an illusion to think that what happens in one country won’t affect many others. Continue reading “Sunday set: Eyes wide open”

Climate: Sea ice at both poles way below average

Antarctic sea ice retreat could set stage for ice shelf collapses

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Melting Greenland glaciers in September 2015, photographed from a passenger jet. @bberwyn photo.

Staff ReportMonths of above-average temperatures in the Arctic slowed the growth of sea ice formation to a crawl during the second half of October, the National Snow and Ice Data Center reported in its latest monthly update.The ice scientists said that, starting Oct. 20, Arctic sea ice started setting daily record lows for extent.  After mid-October, ice growth returned to near-average rates, but extent remained at record low levels through late October. Both sea surface and air temperatures have remained unusually high, extending from the surface high up into the atmosphere. Continue reading “Climate: Sea ice at both poles way below average”

Earth’s plants are soaking up more of our CO2 these days

Study suggests carbon uptake by forests has doubled since the 1950s

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Forests have doubled their CO2 uptake since the 1950s, a new study says. @bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

Scientists say they’ve place yet another piece in the complex global plant-carbon cycle, with a new study suggested that atmospheric CO2 levels have plateaued in recent years because forests and grasslands are removing more of the heat-trapping gas. The research was led by a scientist with the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory .

Fossil fuel burning and other human activities continue to emit increasing amounts of carbon, but the study found that, between 2002 and 2014, the rate at which CO2 increased in the atmosphere held steady at about 1.9 parts per million annually. Continue reading “Earth’s plants are soaking up more of our CO2 these days”

The Paris climate agreement is now in force

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Can the world live up to the ambitions of the Paris climate agreement? @bberwyn photo.

Now the hard work begins …

Staff Report

As the Paris climate agreement goes into effect, it’s important to remember that, so far, there’s been a lot more talk than action by the global community. Plans are one thing, action is another, and unless there are significant cuts in greenhouse gas emissions in the next few years, there’s almost no chance to limit global warming to less than 2 degrees Celsius.

Here are some sobering facts to show why immediate action is needed, starting with the latest annual greenhouse gas bulletin from the World Meteorological Organization.

Carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide all reached new record high concentrations in the atmosphere in 2015. According to the analysis, CO2 levels are not 144 percent higher than in pre-industrial times; methane is 256 percent higher, and nitrous oxide is 121 percent higher. It’s likely that CO2 concentrations, as measured at Mauna Loa, will stay above 400 parts per million for all of 2016. The increase of methane from 2014 to 2015 was larger than that observed from 2013 to 2014 and that averaged over the last decade. Continue reading “The Paris climate agreement is now in force”