Category: gas drilling

Will Colorado voters go for strict fracking regulations?

fracking rig in Colorado
Community advocates in Colorado will start gathering signatures for ballot initiative requiring setbacks for fracking rigs. @bberwyn photo.

Fossil fuel industry attacks proposed ballot measure as economically destructive

Staff Report

Feeling the increased pressure from health- and environment-minded citizens and communities, Colorado’s oil and industry reacted strongly to the news that a proposed fracking-regulation initiative is one step closer to reaching the statewide ballot box.

Initiative 78 would require that all “new oil and gas development facilities” to be located at least  2,500 feet from “occupied structures and areas of special concern.” It would enable local governments to establish greater setbacks, and does not ban new construction within the setbacks. Continue reading “Will Colorado voters go for strict fracking regulations?”

Canadian study finds new earthquake-fracking links

An aerial view of a fracking zone in eastern Utah. @bberwyn photo.

‘I think it’s really just a matter of time before we start seeing damage coming out of this …’

Staff Report

Researchers in western Canada tracking the link between fracking and earthquakes have come to a different conclusion than scientists studying the same issue in the U.S.

Instead of pointing to wastewater injection as the cause of induced earthquakes, the Canadian scientists suggest there may be a direct link between fracking and induced earthquakes.

Research in the central U.S. has suggested that the sharp increase in quakes in places like Oklahoma are caused primarily by massive amounts of wastewater injected back into the ground after oil and gas recovery.

The new Canadian study doesn’t explain why induced seismicity would be linked to different processes in the central U.S. and western Canada. However, some oil and gas fields in the U.S., especially Oklahoma, use “very large amounts of water” in their operations, leading to much more wastewater disposal than in Canadian operations, said Gail M. Atkinson of Western University. Continue reading “Canadian study finds new earthquake-fracking links”

Activists to protest Gulf of Mexico oil and gas leasing

A NASA satellite image shows oil from the Deepwater Horizon disaster spreading across the Gulf of Mexico in May 2010.

Grassroots groups open new front in the battle against fossil fuels and climate change

Staff Report

While conservation groups celebrated the Obama administration’s recent decision to temporarily bar new oil and gas leases off the Atlantic Coast, activists aren’t finished battling the fossil fuel juggernaut quite yet.

Opening a new front in the climate war, hundreds of Gulf Coast residents are joining forces with local and national environmental and social justice groups to oppose a federal offshore fossil fuel lease sale in the Gulf of Mexico — a region that has a long economic dependence on fossil fuel exploitation, so it’s unclear if the protest movement will resonate with a majority of locals. Continue reading “Activists to protest Gulf of Mexico oil and gas leasing”

Feds eye new methane rules for public lands

Feds aim to reduce methane emissions from natural gas production on public lands.

Common sense measures to help meet climate targets

Staff Report

Proposed federal rules could help slow the release of potent heat-trapping methane emissions from gas production on public and Native American lands.

Between 2009 and 2014, enough natural gas was lost through venting, flaring and leaks to power more than five million homes for a year. States, Tribes and federal taxpayers also lose royalty revenues when natural gas is wasted. According to a 2010 Government Accountability Office report, taxpayers lose up to $23 million annually in royalty revenue. Continue reading “Feds eye new methane rules for public lands”

Colorado regulators eye new fracking rules

Oil and gas drilling near schools and homes in Firestone, Colorado. Photo courtesy Shane Davis, Sierra Club, Rocky Mountain Chapter.
Oil and gas drilling near schools and homes in Firestone, Colorado. Photo courtesy Shane Davis, Sierra Club, Rocky Mountain Chapter.

State commission will meet Jan. 25 to take action on proposed regulations

Staff Report

The Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission is set to take some modest steps to strengthen its oversight of oil and gas development in Colorado by considering new rules that would require more cooperation between fracking operators and local communities.

The commission will meet Jan. 25 to consider rules that would ensure that fossil fuel companies provide earlier notice to local governments, as well as an opportunity for local officials to work with operators on the location of large oil and gas facilities adjacent to communities. Continue reading “Colorado regulators eye new fracking rules”

Shell wants to hang on to Arctic Ocean drilling leases

Shell isn’t ready completely give up on the idea of drilling for fossil fuel in the Arctic Ocean.

Company seeks extension from appeals board

Staff Report

*Read more Summit Voice stories on Shell’s ill-fated Arctic drilling program here.

It was big news when Shell Oil in September announced it was shutting down its contested Arctic drilling program, but the company apparently doesn’t want give up completely. Just a couple of months after the big news, Shell sought at least extend the life of its leases in the region.

Without an extension, the company’s Beaufort Sea leases are set to expire in 2017, and its Chukchi Sea leases in 2020. The U.S. Interior Department has already denied the extension, but company is now challenging that decision with the Department of Interior Board of Land Appeals. Continue reading “Shell wants to hang on to Arctic Ocean drilling leases”

State of emergency declared at massive California gas leak

Escaping methane seen as climate disaster

The massive California gas leak is made visible by infrared imaging. Video courtesy Environmental Defense Fund.

Staff Report

More than two months after massive amounts of gas started leaking from a storage facility in Aliso Canyon, California Governor Jerry Brown declared a state of emergency at the site, ordering state agencies to focus on protecting public health and stopping the flow.

The order is aimed at convincing the public that the state is doing all it can to protect public health and the environment by detailing the government’s ongoing effort to stop the leak.

Some environmental groups said Governor Brown’s declaration comes a little late in the game, and highlights the dangers of fossil fuels.

“This leak has been a state of emergency for the Porter Ranch community and the climate since day one. Governor Brown is right to call it such and to shut down the facility until it is made safe,” said Mark Brownstein, vice president of climate and energy with the Environmental Defense Fund.

At peak measurement, the leak was pumping 72 million cubic feet of methane into the atmosphere and causing, every day, as much climate damage in the next 20 years as 7 million cars on the road. Continue reading “State of emergency declared at massive California gas leak”