Category: endangered species

Wildlife in Southeast will need help to survive global warming

Some species of turtles in North America will be hard-pressed to survive global warming. bberwyn photo.
Some species of turtles in the Southeast will be hard-pressed to survive global warming without help.  @bberwyn photo.

New study IDs climate connectivity corridors that can help plants and animals move

By Bob Berwyn

Natural habitat in the eastern half of the U.S. has been so fragmented by roads, farms and cities that many plants and animals won’t be able to survive global warming without a lot of help.

That means thinking about the concept of climate connectivity, according to a new study that aims to give policy makers tools to consider climate change for development and conservation planning.

The research, reported June 13 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows how creating climate-specific movement corridors could give many species a better chance to survive the warming expected in the coming decades. Continue reading “Wildlife in Southeast will need help to survive global warming”

Wildlife: Wyoming grizzly hunting plan challenged in court

Grizzly bear attacks are rare, and hikers are encouraged to carry pepper spray to deter attacks. PHOTO COURTESY U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE.
Grizzlies are under the gun in Wyoming. Photo via USFWS.

Activists say public was short-changed on comment period

Staff Report

Wildlife advocates are going to court to challenge a proposed grizzly hunting plan in Wyoming. A lawsuit filed last week alleges that he Wyoming Game and Fish Commission illegally fast-tracked approval of the plan without allowing adequate public comment.

The approval would authorize the state’s first trophy hunt of grizzly bears in 40 years, but the public only had 30 days to review and comment on the plan — far too short to be able to evaluate the biological consequences of the proposed hunt. The commission simultaneously adopted a tri-state memorandum of agreement with Idaho and Montana to formalize quotas for grizzly hunts, allocating over 50 percent of the quota to Wyoming. Continue reading “Wildlife: Wyoming grizzly hunting plan challenged in court”

Colorado Parks and Wildlife targets illegally stocked pike in Green Mountain Reservoir with a bounty for anglers

Northern pike
Colorado Parks and Wildlife is offering a $20 bounty for northern pike caught in Green Mountain Reservoir. Photo courtesy CPW.

Non-native predators could threaten endangered species in Colorado River

Staff Report

Colorado wildlife managers will try to curb expansion of non-native northern pike in Summit County’s Green Mountain Reservoir by paying anglers a $20 bounty for each fish they deliver to the Heeney Marina.

The illegally introduced fish are taking a toll on trout in the reservoir north of Silverthorne and could escape to the Blue River and make their way to the Colorado River. That could add to the challenges of trying to recover four endangered native Colorado River fish species, according to Colorado Parks and Wildlife.

“The (pike) were dumped in there several years ago by someone who selfishly didn’t consider the serious consequences we are now dealing with,” said CPW aquatic biologist Jon Ewert. “People should know that illicit stocking is a problem not only for ethical reasons but legal reasons as well. Anyone caught doing it faces severe penalties.” Continue reading “Colorado Parks and Wildlife targets illegally stocked pike in Green Mountain Reservoir with a bounty for anglers”

USGS scientists sound another warning on amphibian extinctions

boreal toad
The last living boreal toad found 2006 in the Cucumber Gulch wetlands in Breckenridge, Colorado. @bberwyn photo.

Focused local conservation efforts needed to stem slow the rapid decline

Staff Report

In an era that’s already being defined by an unprecedented global rate of species extinctions, the amphibian die-off is especially troubling, and the trend continues unchecked, according to a new study led by the U.S. Geological Survey.

And for now, there is no smoking gun pointing to a single reason for the decline. That means there’s no easy answer, either, the scientists said, explaining that, across the U.S. there are multiple and geographically diverse factors that play role.

A 2013 study found that pesticides may be linked with die-offs of amphibians, bats and birds because the toxic chemicals suppress immunity. More recently, researchers identified a new invasive fungus that threatens salamanders in the U.S., and yet another study said pollution and climate change are key threats to amphibians. In Spain, a newly discovered virus is taking toll on amphibians. Continue reading “USGS scientists sound another warning on amphibian extinctions”

Debris-free beaches aid sea turtle nesting

loggerhead sea turtle
A loggerhead turtle heads toward the sea at Cape Hatteras National Seashore.

New study shows how to help recover endangered loggerheads

Staff Report

Nobody likes a dirty bedroom and sea turtles are no exception.

New research by scientists at the University of Florida shows that removing beach debris helps sea turtle nesting. At cleared beaches, the number of nests rose by as much as 200 percent, the study shows, while leaving the detritus decreased the number by nearly 50 percent.

With many sea turtle species classified as endangered or threatened, restoring nesting habitat is critical to keeping them alive, said Ikuko Fujisaki, the study’s lead author and an assistant research professor of wildlife ecology and conservation with the UF Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. Continue reading “Debris-free beaches aid sea turtle nesting”

Vaquita population drops to brink of extinction

Continued poaching is pushing the vaquita toward extinction. Photo courtesy Paula Olsen/NOAA.

New survey results show as few as 60 remaining vaquita porpoises in the Gulf of California

Staff Report

The population of vaquita porpoises in the Gulf of California may be down to just 60 individuals, according to conservation advocates, who released the results of recent surveys in a press release last week.

The vaquita is the world’s smallest and most endangered porpoise and could be extinct in less than a decade without stringent conservation measures, especially a complete and well-enforced ban on gill nets in the northern Gulf of California. The new vaquita population estimate is based on observer data and acoustic monitoring conducted during a joint Mexico-U.S. vaquita research cruise last fall. Continue reading “Vaquita population drops to brink of extinction”

Wildlife: Court settlement compels feds to complete recovery plan for Mexican gray wolves in the Southwest

Mexican gray wolfWolf advocates hope for more releases of captive-bred wolves

Staff Report

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service this week agreed to prepare a recovery plan for Mexican gray wolves by 2017. The court settlement will compel the federal agency to finally meet its legal obligation to ensure that the wolves can establish a healthy, sustainable population. The settlement may speed up the slow-going conservation and recovery effort.

The settlement came in response to a lawsuit filed by a coalition of wolf-conservation groups, environmental organizations and a retired federal wolf biologist. Less than 100 Mexican gray wolves exist in the wild, making it one of the most endangered mammals in North America. The settlement follows a September 2015 ruling by a federal judge in Tucson that rejected the government’s effort to dismiss the case.

The recovery effort has long been mired in politics, with conservative Republican lawmakers setting roadblocks at every turn, pressuring the USFWS from the state level and trying to make end runs around the Endangered Species Act in Congress. Continue reading “Wildlife: Court settlement compels feds to complete recovery plan for Mexican gray wolves in the Southwest”