Category: endangered species

17 years later, feds still playing politics with threatened lynx

Routine studies delayed, protections lagging …

The U.S. Forest Service will track lynx this coming winter to learn how they are responding to changes in forest habitat and to human activities. PHOTO BY TANYA SHENK, COLORADO DIVISION OF WILDLIFE.

Staff Report

The U.S. Forest Service started dragging its feet on protecting lynx ever since the wild cat was designated as a threatened species in 2000, and that pattern continues to this day. The Center for Biological Diversity has released a document suggesting that the agency’s Northern Rockies office dawdled for eight months working on a routine biological assessment that is often done in just a few weeks.

Superficially at issue are regional forest plans for mining and logging in and near lynx habitat, but the CBD’s conservation expert said the delay is more disturbing because it’s linked with a GOP effort to weaken the Endangered Species Act. Continue reading “17 years later, feds still playing politics with threatened lynx”

Advertisements

Federal court stalls Las Vegas water grab

Federal court slows Las Vegas water grab.

Environmental studies flawed

Staff Report

A federal court has at least temporarily stifled a major water grab in Nevada, finding that the Bureau of Land Management didn’t adequately study and disclose impacts from groundwater pumping scheme by Las Vegas. At issue are losses of wetlands and wildlife habitat that would result from the Southern Nevada Water Authority’s massive groundwater pipeline development project.

The court ruled that the BLM violated federal environmental laws by failing to demonstrate how it would compensate for the destruction of thousands of acres of wetlands and sensitive habitat in eastern Nevada. Continue reading “Federal court stalls Las Vegas water grab”

Western governors seek to weaken Endangered Species Act

Suggested changes would lead to extinction of some species

A lynx kitten in Colorado. Photo courtesy Colorado Parks and Wildlife.

Staff Report

Governors of western states talk a good game when it comes to natural resources conservation, but when the rubber hits the road, they’ve never really been willing to walk the walk.

At its recent meeting in Montana, the Western Governors Association endorsed a  policy resolution today that, if adopted into law, would substantially weaken the core of the Endangered Species Act. Continue reading “Western governors seek to weaken Endangered Species Act”

Grizzly delisting to be challenged in court

The federal government is once again allowing politics to trump science it its decision to take grizzly bears off the endangered species list. Photo courtesy USFWS.

Species far from recovered, wildlife advocates say

Staff Report

Once again, the U.S. court system will have the final say over an endangered species decision by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Conservation groups say they are preparing to sue the agency over its recent decision to take Montana’s grizzly bears off the endangered species list.

Wildlife advocates say the the decision violated the Endangered Species Act because grizzlies have not been recovered across a substantial portion of their historic range, and still face threats from habitat loss, poaching and a dwindling supply of food. The proposal would hand management of the species over to individual states. Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho all plan to permit grizzly trophy hunting. Continue reading “Grizzly delisting to be challenged in court”

Marine preserves can protect oceans from global warming

Major study shows need for expansion of protected areas

Oceanic birds and birds that rely on coastal habitat face challenges related to climate change. Larger and well-managed marine protected areas would help buffer some of those impacts. @bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

As much as a third of the world’s oceans should be protected to help buffer against long-term climate change impacts, scientists said in a new study, calling for an expansion of protected areas, as well as better management.

Globally, coastal nations have committed to protecting 10 percent of their waters by 2020, but only 3.5 percent of the ocean has been set aside, and less than half of that (1.6 percent) is strongly protected from exploitation.

Results of the study, which evaluated 145 peer-reviewed studies on the impact of marine reserves, is being published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

“Marine reserves cannot halt or completely offset the growing impacts of climate change,” said Oregon State University’s Jane Lubchenco, former National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Administrator and co-author on the study. “But they can make marine ecosystems more resilient to changes and, in some cases, help slow down the rate of climate change. Continue reading “Marine preserves can protect oceans from global warming”

Federal judge nixes Wolf Creek development scheme

Forest Service violated federal law with land swap approval

A map included in a feasibility analysis shows the lands near Wolf Creek proposed for a trade.

By Bob Berwyn

*Read previous Summit Voice coverage here

A federal court judge has put an end to a 30-year battle over a proposed resort development at Wolf Creek Pass.

Ruling that the U.S. Forest Service violated federal law when it made an arbitrary and capricious decision to approve a land exchange near Wolf Creek Ski Area, U.S. District Court Judge Richard Matsch set aside the agency’s 2015 approval for a land trade that would have enabled large-scale resort development., The decisions says the Forest Service failed to look closely at the environmental impacts of its decision, and failed to listen to the public before making its decision. Continue reading “Federal judge nixes Wolf Creek development scheme”

Can grizzlies survive global warming?

New study shows many bears still rely on dwindling whitebark pine seeds

An adult grizzly bear in the brush. Photo courtesy USFWS.

Staff Report

The long-term survival of grizzles in the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem may depend on whether they’re willing to switch from eating whitebark pine seeds to other types food.

Some of the bears have already started responding to reductions in whitebark trees by consuming more plants and berries, while others are still focused on finding stashes of the nutritious pine nuts, scientists said in a new study based on analyzing the chemical composition of what the grizzlies eat. Continue reading “Can grizzlies survive global warming?”