Category: endangered species

Study says road threat to carnivores is underestimated globally

Findings to help guide conservation strategies

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Many carnivore species around the world are threatened by road networks. Photo courtesy USFWS.

Staff Report

The threat of roads to carnivore species around the world has been seriously underestimated, according to a new study that looked at the issue on a global scale.

After looking at 232 carnivore species around the world (out of a total of about. 270 existing species) and assessing how severely these are affected by roads cut through their habitat, the researchers concluded that some rare species are even at risk in areas with low road densities. The study, published in the journal Global Ecology and Biogeography, calculated natural mortality rates, reproduction and carnivore movement patterns, determining the maximum density of roads that a species can cope with. Continue reading “Study says road threat to carnivores is underestimated globally”

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Endangered Indiana bats face twin threat from wind turbines and white-nose syndrome

Indiana bats hibernating in a cave. PHOTO COURTESY USGS/ANDREW KING.
Indiana bats hibernating in a cave. PHOTO COURTESY USGS/ANDREW KING.

Small hibernating bat colonies need protection to prevent extinction

Staff Report

Between collisions with wind turbines and deadly white-nose syndrome, endangered Indiana bats may not have much of a chance of recovering, according to a recently published U.S. Geological Survey study.

The researchers used a scientific model to compare how wind turbine mortality and WNS may singly and then together affect Indiana bat population dynamics throughout the species’ U.S. range. Continue reading “Endangered Indiana bats face twin threat from wind turbines and white-nose syndrome”

Feds eye grizzly reintroduction in North Cascades

Draft plan posted for public comment

A grizzly boar on the Brooks River in Alaska. Photo by Kim Fenske.
A grizzly boar on the Brooks River in Alaska. Photo by Kim Fenske.
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Re-establishing a self-sustaining population of grizzlies in the North Cascades ecosystem could help reach overall recovery goals for the predators, which have been on the endangered species list since 1975.

Staff Report

Federal biologists say they can boost the population of grizzly bears in the North Cascades ecosystem by relocating the predators from other areas. The National Park Service and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service this week released a draft plan (open for public comment), for increasing the total number of bears in the region to 200. Bt current estimates, only about 10 remain, too small a population to sustain itself. According to the draft plan, grizzly bears could be relocated from either northwestern Montana or south-central British Columbia.

“We’re happy to see the agencies taking a step in the right direction to restore grizzly bears to the North Cascades,” said Andrea Santarsiere, a senior attorney with the Center for Biological Diversity. “Without a helping hand, grizzly bears are likely to disappear from the Pacific Northwest.” Continue reading “Feds eye grizzly reintroduction in North Cascades”

Conservation groups eye emergency rescue plan for vaquitas

‘We are watching this precious native species disappear before our eyes’

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Can vaquitas be saved by keeping them in captivity? Photo courtesy NOAA.

Staff Report

For more background, check the Summit Voice vaquita archive.

With perhaps fewer than 100 vaquitas remaining in the Gulf of California, conservation experts say they will start a last-ditch recovery effort by trying to capture several of the marine mammals and keeping them in a temporary sanctuary. The emergency action plan will be led by the Mexican government and supported by a consortium of marine mammal experts from more than a dozen organizations around the world.

Despite substantial efforts by the Mexican government to protect vaquitas, the recovery team recently reviewed the latest results from advanced acoustic monitoring technology that showed the vaquita population continuing to rapidly decline.

“We are watching this precious native species disappear before our eyes,” said Rafael Pacchiano, Mexico’s secretary of the environment and natural resources. “This critical rescue effort is a priority for the Mexican government and we are dedicated to providing the necessary resources in order to give the plan its best chance of success.” The plan will be implemented in tandem with ongoing efforts to remove the threat of gillnets in the Upper Gulf of California and eliminate illegal fishing. Continue reading “Conservation groups eye emergency rescue plan for vaquitas”

Feds finalize polar bear conservation plan

Outlook not good as sea ice dwindles

 Eric Regehr, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Can polar bears survive global warming? Photo courtesy Eric Regehr, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Staff Report

A federal recovery plan for endangered polar bears won’t halt the threat of climate change, but it could help dwindling populations of the great Arctic predators persist in the small patches of habitat that will remain after global warming melts most of the polar sea ice.

The plan, released Jan. 9, calls for reducing human-bear conflicts, collaboratively managing subsistence harvest, protecting denning habitat, and minimizing the risk of contamination from oil spills. Most of these actions are already underway, in partnership with Alaska Native communities, nonprofit groups, and industry representatives who participated in the plan’s creation. The plan also calls for increased monitoring and research. Continue reading “Feds finalize polar bear conservation plan”

GOP tries to shield anti-wolf bill from legal review

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When will the wolf battles end? Photo by USFWS.

Republicans apparently willing to use authoritarian tools in their war on the environment

By Bob Berwyn

The GOP-dominated Congress is flexing its political muscle with legislation that would override the Endangered Species Act by removing federal protection for wolves in the Great Lakes region and Wyoming, making the animals vulnerable to state-regulated trophy hunting and trapping.

This isn’t the first time anti-environmental lawmakers have tried this, but what is new is that, this time, they’re trying to encroach on the longstanding system of checks and balances by passing a law that would prevent new judicial review. Continue reading “GOP tries to shield anti-wolf bill from legal review”

Study IDs key humpback whale habitats near Madagascar

A humpback whale near Hawaii. Photo courtesy NOAA.
A humpback whale near Hawaii. Photo courtesy NOAA.

Increase in offshore energy development spurs conservation concerns

Staff Report

Humpback whales have always congregated in near-shore breeding areas, which makes them more susceptible to pressures from land-based and near-shore human activity, and the populations in the southwestern Indian Ocean are no exception. Scientists tracking the great cetaceans off the east coast of Africa say there are several areas near Madagascar that need protection from expanding offshore energy exploration.

After tagging several whales and tracing their movements via satellite, the scientists said their data can define potentially sensitive areas that should be protected from the disruption of seismic testing or other industrial development that could be destructive to the humpback population and this globally important marine habitat. Continue reading “Study IDs key humpback whale habitats near Madagascar”