Global warming means major changes for U.S. fisheries

Warming ocean will drive many commercially important species to new habitats; detailed projections can help  coastal communities adapt

Shrimp boats in the Gulf of Mexico. @bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

Climate change isn’t just heating the surface of the Earth. It’s also warming deep ocean water, and along the coast of the northeastern U.S. bottom-water temperatures are expected to increase by 6.6 to 9 degrees Celsius by 2100.

That means that commercially important marine species will also continue to shift northward, which is important information for fishermen trying to make living in the region. Just how much and when they will move is the subject of new research published this week in the journal Progress in Oceanography.

“Species that are currently found in the Mid-Atlantic Bight and on Georges Bank may have enough suitable habitat in the future because they can shift northward as temperatures increase,” said lead author Kristin Kleisner, formerly of the NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center  Ecosystems Dynamics and Assessment Branch and now a senior scientist at the Environmental Defense Fund. “Species concentrated in the Gulf of Maine, where species have shifted to deeper water rather than northward, may be more likely to experience a significant decline in suitable habitat and move out of the region altogether.”

The researchers used bottom trawl survey data collected between 1968 and 2013 on the shelf to estimate niches for 58 species. A high-resolution global climate model was used to generate projections of future surface and bottom ocean temperatures across the region. The future temperatures were then used to project where marine species would find suitable habitat.

Researchers looked at species distributions in spring and fall in the Gulf of Maine on the northern part of the Northeast Shelf and those on the southern end, from Georges Bank to the Mid-Atlantic Bight. They also examined what the shifting distributions might mean for fishing communities by looking at the current and potential future distance between the main fishing port in each state and the center of the distribution of suitable thermal area for the top-landed species by weight in each state.

Key northern species including Acadian redfish, American plaice, Atlantic cod, haddock, and thorny skate may lose thermal habitat, while spiny dogfish and American lobster may gain. Projected ocean warming in the Gulf of Maine may create beneficial conditions for American lobster populations, and they may continue to be accessible to fishing ports in the region.

In contrast, species like monkfish, witch flounder, white hake and sea scallops may remain accessible to major local fishing ports but could experience strong declines in habitat due to ocean warming. Atlantic cod, which is at the southern end of its range, may find suitable thermal habitat off the shelf entirely or in more northern waters in Canada.

In states south of New York, the distance to the centers of species distribution from ports may increase for some species, including summer flounder, which is currently the third most-landed species in Virginia. In North Carolina, the distance from ports to the center of distribution may increase for all six of the top landed species. Among the top six species landed in Virginia, only Atlantic croaker and striped bass are projected to have more suitable habitat.

“Warming waters may have a positive effect on smooth dogfish, Atlantic croaker, and striped bass in the southern part of the Northeast Shelf, with increases in suitable habitat in terms of area and species abundance, ” Kleisner said. “But these species are also shifting northward and the bulk of the biomass of some species may be further from the main ports in southern states, making it more costly for fishermen to access these species. Conversely, as species move into new regions, fishermen may have new opportunities.”

The projections indicate that as species shift from one management jurisdiction to another, or span state and federal jurisdictions, increased collaboration among management groups will be needed to set quotas and establish allocations.

“These changes will depend on the pace of climate change and on the ability of species to adapt or shift elsewhere to maintain a preferred habitat,” said Kleisner. “We did not examine fishing pressure, species interactions and other factors that may influence future distributions. However, given the historical changes observed on the Northeast Shelf over the past five decades and confidence in the projection of continued ocean warming in the region, it is likely there will be major changes within this ecosystem.”

“Those changes will result in ecological, economic, social, and natural resource management challenges throughout the region,” Kleisner said. “It is important to understand large-scale patterns in these changes so that we can plan for and mitigate adverse effects as much as possible.”

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One thought on “Global warming means major changes for U.S. fisheries

  1. “They also examined what the shifting distributions might mean for fishing communities by looking at the current and potential future distance between the main fishing port in each state and the center of the distribution of suitable thermal area for the top-landed species by weight in each state.”

    Put the fish habitat projections together with the sea level rise and inundation of fishing ports and you have an entirely different economic picture, both for 2050 and especially 2100. Use different scenarios for Greenland and west Antarctic glacier melting. Connect the dots!

    Bert Melcher

    .

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