Scientists say it’s time to step up ocean conservation efforts

The Mediterranean at Cassis, France.
The Mediterranean Sea at Cassis, France. @bberwyn photo.

‘The politics of ocean protection are too often disconnected from the science and knowledge that supports it …’

Staff Report

In a perfect world, anywhere from 10 to 50 percent of the world’s oceans would have some type of protection to help sustain ecosystems and critical resources. But while recent decades have brought some progress in ocean conservation, we’re still far from the targets set by scientists, according to a new study published in the journal Science.

Right now, about 1.6 of the world’s oceans have strong protections, lagging far behind terrestrial conservation efforts. In the new study, researchers with Oregon State University point out that numerous international policy agreements call for protection of 10 percent of coastal and marine areas by 2020.

“The world is well on its way to meeting targets set for protection on land, but far from its goals for ocean protection,” said Jane Lubchenco, who is the OSU University Distinguished Professor and Adviser in Marine Studies, former NOAA administrator, U.S. Science Envoy for the Ocean and a marine biologist in the OSU College of Science.

The study’s authors said that the science of marine protected areas is now mature and extensive, and the multiple threats facing the Earth’s ocean from overfishing, climate change, loss of biodiversity, acidification are well documented and warrant more accelerated action.

“We’ve seen an acceleration of progress in recent years, and that’s good,” Lubchenco said. “But the politics of ocean protection are too often disconnected from the science and knowledge that supports it, and there are many things we can do to help bridge that gap.”

Even with the recent creation of new protected ocean reserves, only 3.5 percent of the ocean has any form of protection,” said Kirsten Grorud-Colvert, an OSU assistant professor of research and director of the Science of Marine Reserves Project.

“In contrast, the target to protect 17 percent of the terrestrial part of the planet is expected to be met by 2020, and it already stands at 15 percent,” Grorud-Colverts said. “There is so much more that needs to be done to protect the ocean, and we have the scientific knowledge to inform the decision-making.”

Marine protection can range from “lightly protected” which allows some protection but significant extractive activity, to the “full” protection usually identified as marine reserves. Such areas, covering an almost undectable total area of the ocean a decade ago, are rapidly gaining attention as their social, economic, and environmental benefits become more clear.

To further speed that progress, the OSU researchers highlighted seven key findings. They include:

  • Full protection works. Fully protected and effectively enforced areas generally result in quite significant increases in biomass, size of individuals and diversity inside a reserve. Those benefits in turn often spill over to adjacent areas outside the reserve.
  • Habitats are connected. Many species move among habitats during their life cycles, so a range of protected areas will aid in protecting biodiversity and enhancing benefits inside and outside the reserve.
  • Networks allow fishing. A network, or set of reserves that are connected by the movement of juveniles and adults, can provide many of the benefits of a single large area, while still allowing fishing between the reserves.
  • Engaging users usually improves outcomes. Fishers, managers, conservation advocates, and scientists can work together to address both conservation and fishery goals.
  • Reserves can enhance resilience. Large and strategically placed reserves can assist in adapting to environmental and climatic changes.
  • Planning saves money. Smart planning can reduce costs of creating reserves and increase their economic benefits, in some cases making them more valuable than before the reserve was created.
  • Ecosystems matter. Complementary efforts to ensure sustainable uses outside a reserve are needed, and should be integrated to ensure viable levels of activities such as fishing, aquaculture, energy generation, recreation and marine protection. The goal is to use the ocean without using it up.

The scientists said that policy improvements can be aided by embracing more options, bringing more users into the discussion, and changing incentives so that economic and social impacts can be minimized. New enforcement technologies can also help, along with integrating reserves with other management measures.

“An accelerated pace of protection will be needed for the ocean to provide the full range of benefits people want and need,” the scientists wrote in their conclusion.

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One thought on “Scientists say it’s time to step up ocean conservation efforts

  1. Are these some of the scientists that are on the Government payroll? Any connection called job security, keep the cash coming.

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