Bill would end searches of electronic devices for U.S. citizens returning from travel abroad

Can the feds search your phone at the border?

Privacy rights have been eroded in the endless war on terror

Staff Report

Colorado Congressman Jared Polis (D-Boulder) wants to limit the U.S. government’s ability to search your electronic devices when you return from overseas travel. A new bill Polis introduced this week, the Protecting Data at the Border Act, would make it harder for federal agents to seize and search your laptop, smartphone or tablet.

The legislation was introduced jointly on April 4, as H.R. 1899 in the House by Rep. Jared Polis (D-CO2) and S. 823 in the Senate by Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR). Specifically, it would prevent customs officials at the border  from searching anybody’s digital device without a warrant. Privacy and civil rights advocates have long argued that warrantless searches of devices at the border are illegal. Continue reading “Bill would end searches of electronic devices for U.S. citizens returning from travel abroad”

Advertisements

Major U.S. companies urge Trump to stay in Paris climate deal

The Paris agreement is the world’s best chance of limiting global warming and avoiding major climate disruptions. @bberwyn photo.

Global agreement helps manage climate risks, generates jobs

Staff Report

Major companies, including across the U.S. economy are urging President Trump to keep the United States in the Paris climate change agreement. The U.S. must stay at the table to help steer efforts to manage rising climate risks and compete in expanding global clean energy markets, according to a letter to the president Trump organized by the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions.

“By committing all countries to action, the agreement expands markets for innovative clean technologies, generating jobs and economic growth,” the letter says. “U.S. companies are well positioned to lead, and lack of U.S. participation could put their access to these growing markets at risk.’’ Continue reading “Major U.S. companies urge Trump to stay in Paris climate deal”

Sunday set: Global change

Travel a little, learn a lot

This set includes illustrations for some of my most recent stories in various environmental and climate news publications and if you’re a regular Summit Voice reader who is not on Twitter or Instagram, I’m providing a few links here.

A couple of weeks ago, I wrote about how some of Greenlands coastal glaciers already passed passed a climate change tipping point about 20 years ago. Because of the physical processes of snowmelt and runoff, these glaciers are going to disappear even if global greenhouse gas emissions are cut to zero immediately. You can read the story here.

For Pacific Standard, I put together an environmental photo essay on bumblebees, some of the most important pollinators of wildflowers, especially in mountain regions and also in the far north. Bumblebees are important because they are cold-tolerant, so they’re out and about visiting early blooms while other pollinators are dormant. They’ll also fly long distances to visit a single flower. Without them, some species would go extinct. Check out the photo essay here.

You might have seen the recent Summit Voice story on beach erosion and how it’s going to wash away some world famous surf spots along the California coast, and in other areas where coastal strands are ringed by mountains, but if you missed it, you can see it here.

I also wrote about the annual Austrian glacier report for Deutsche Welle, a great global news organization that really does in-depth environmental and climate reporting. You can visit the DW website here, or follow them on Twitter for a daily feed. And my story on the dwindling glaciers is here.

Finally, in a critical story for Colorado and the rest of the West, I reported on how we are losing the war on wildfires and how we need to change our way of thinking about forests and fires in an era of rapid climate change. The story is online at Pacific Standard.

Sea level rise overwhelming some coral reefs

A sea turtle swims lazily along a coral reef in Hawaii, trailed by tropical fish. (Photo by Kosta Stamoulis, courtesy Oregon State University via Flickr.)

Seafloor erosion outpacing expectations

Staff Report

Coral reefs aren’t just threatened by pollution, ocean acidification and over-heated ocean temperatures. In some places they are being undermined by erosion of the seafloor, U.S. Geological Survey scientists said in a new study that looked at reefs in Florida, the Caribbean and Hawaii.

In the five study sites, the reefs can’t keep pace with sea level rise. As a result, coastal communities protected by the reefs are facing increased risks from storms, waves and erosion.

The degradation of reefs and the subsiding seafloor go hand-in-hand, as sand and other sea floor materials have eroded over the past few decades. In the waters around Maui, the sea floor losses amounted to 81 million cubic meters of sand, rock and other material – about what it would take to fill up the Empire State Building 81 times, the researchers calculated.  Continue reading “Sea level rise overwhelming some coral reefs”

Rising sea level threatens Southern California beaches

Without expensive measures, some strands will vanish by 2100

Dusk surfing sessions at many Southern California beaches are at risk from sea level rise. @bberwyn photo.
Surfing El Granada in central California. @bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

Scientists are warily watching the impacts of rising sea levels along the world’s coastlines, where a high percentage of the global population lives and works. In some areas — especially narrow strands are pinned between the open ocean and coastal mountains, beaches may vanish by 2100 as higher waves and bigger storm surges wash away the precious sand.

Even with efforts to bolster them, between 31 percent and 67 percent of Southern California beaches may be completely eroded, scientists said this month after using a new climate model to calculate the effects of 3 to 6 feet of sea level rise. Continue reading “Rising sea level threatens Southern California beaches”

Survey shows very little climate skepticism in Europe

Widespread support for climate action in 4 major European countries

The average global temperature spiked to yet another record in March 2016.

Planet Earth experienced its second-warmest March on record. Map via NASA.

Staff Report

More than eight out of 10 people in the UK, France, Germany and Norway believe that the world’s climate is changing, and a similar proportion think that it is at least partly caused by human activity, according to a recent scientific survey conducted by European researchers.

The survey of more than 4,000 members of the public explored opinions on climate change, climate policy and future energy options. It showed that a wide majority also  support a range of different measures to combat climate change. Continue reading “Survey shows very little climate skepticism in Europe”

Alaska’s senators want more offshore drilling in Arctic waters

GOP assault on the environment continues

Alaska’s GOP senators say drill, baby drill in waters off their state’s north coast.

Staff Report

Environmental protections are under attack on every front and the far North is no exception. Alaska’s senators Lisa Murkowski and Dan Sullivan, both Republicans, appear willing to risk fragile ocean environments for a few more petrodollars, so they’ve opportunistically introduced a bill that would expand oil and gas drilling in the Arctic Ocean and Cook Inlet, where a recent gas leak persisted for several months, according to InsideClimate News.

Senate Bill 883 seeks to reverse protections established by President Obama in Dec. 2016 and force the Department of the Interior to quickly approve new oil and gas leasing.

“It’s not possible to drill safely in the Arctic, as we just saw from the leaking oil and gas well on the North Slope,” said Miyoko Sakashita, ocean programs director at the Center for Biological Diversity. “This legislation’s nothing more than a giveaway to oil companies. It’ll hurt Alaska’s healthy habitat and endangered wildlife.” Continue reading “Alaska’s senators want more offshore drilling in Arctic waters”