About these ads

Study: Killing wolves to save cattle usually backfires

Lethal predator control leads to more livestock kills

Heavy snow has pushed elk out of the high country, so the Colorado Division of Wildlife will try to divert them from important livestock feeding areas in the Yampa Valley. PHOTO COURTESY THE NATIONAL PAKR SERVICE.

Yellowstone wolves surround an elk.  Photo courtesy National Park Service.

Staff Report

FRISCO — Killing wolves to keep them from killing livestock is counterproductive and actually leads to more predation — up to a certain point — according to Washington State University researchers.

The scientists tested the idea that lethal control is an effective way of slowing predation and found the hypothesis lacking. Shooting and trapping lead to more dead sheep and cattle the following year, not fewer, they concluded in their study, published in the journal PLOS ONE. Continue reading

About these ads

Wildlife: Feds cancel permit for wolf-hunting contest

Pending court challenge may have been factor in BLM decision

nj;

A Yellowstone wolf pack confronts a bull elk. Photo courtesy National Park Service.

Staff Report

FRISCO —Anti-wildlife Idaho residents won’t get a chance to slaughter predators in a government-sanctioned event this year, as the Bureau of Land Management has decided to cancel a permit for a so-called predator derby that was scheduled to be held on public lands near Salmon in January.

The event would have offered prizes in a contest to kill the most wolves, coyotes, and other species over three days every year for five years, beginning Jan. 2, 2015. Continue reading

Wildlife: Feds say genetic testing confirms that wolf near Grand Canyon is from the Northern Rockies

Trapping efforts suspended for now

Grand Canyon wolf

A gray wolf that wandered at least 450 miles from the northern Rockies is now living near the Grand Canyon in Arizona. Photo courtesy Arizona Game and Fish Department.

By Bob Berwyn

FRISCO — Federal biologists say that, based on a genetic analysis of scat, they’re now 100 percent sure that the wolf-like animal spotted near the North Rim of the Grand Canyon is in fact a wild Rocky Mountain gray wolf.

The confirmation clarifies that this gray wolf is fully protected under the Endangered Species Act, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced. Biologists have been tracking the canid since early October and were able to collect scat samples in early November. Continue reading

Wildlife: Wyoming wolves get reprieve

sadf

A federal judge has blocked Wyoming’s unsustainable wolf management plan. Photo courtesy USFWS.

Federal judge invalidates state hunting plan

Staff Report

FRISCO — Wyoming wolves will get at least a temporary reprieve from the state’s shoot-on-sight management plan, as a federal judge this week set aside a 2012 decision that turned wolf management over to the state.

The state plan, approved by the Wyoming legislature, would allow hunters and trappers to kill most wolves outside of Yellowstone National Park, leaving only a token population in the park — hardly in keeping with the spirit and intent of the Endangered Species Act. Continue reading

Wildlife: Denali wolf packs hammered by hunting

sdfg

Wolves draw tourists to Denali National Park.

Death of breeding wolves affects pack size and persistence

Staff Report

FRISCO — Following a steep drop in the Denali National Park wolf population, biologists have documented how the death of breeding wolves affects pack size and persistence. The number of wolves in the 6million acre park in Alaska dropped from 143 in the fall of 2007 to just 55 wolves in the spring of 2013, raising concerns about impacts to tourism.

Many visitors come to Denali with the expectation of seeing wolves, but a recent state decision to allow wolf hunting in area previously deemed a buffer zone has had a big impact on wolf numbers. According to the latest research, the death of a breeding wolf sometimes results in a wolfpack disbanding. Continue reading

Wolves get more protection in California

State decides on endangered species status for wolves even as feds proceed with national de-listing push

asfd

Wolf pups near the Oregon-California border may be the offspring of a wolf that has lived part-time in California the past few years. Photo courtesy USFWS.

Staff Report

FRISCO — When wolves start to reclaim their historic territories in the wilds of California, they’ll be protected under state law. The California Fish and Game Commission voted last week to protect gray wolves under the state’s Endangered Species Act after being petitioned by the Center for Biological Diversity.

The decision came just a few days after biologists documented the presence of two wolf pups  in the Oregon portion of the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest that straddles the California-Oregon border. The pups, which are likely to be part of a litter of four to six pups, are the offspring of the wolf known as OR-7, which has made California part of his range for the past four years. Continue reading

New Idaho wolf law draws howls of outrage

State lawmakers aim to cut wolf numbers drastically

A wolf in Yellowstone National Park. (Photo courtesy of Yellowstone National Park)

A wolf in Yellowstone National Park. Photo courtesy of Yellowstone National Park.

Staff Report

FRISCO — Just a few years after Congress removed endangered species protection for wolves in Idaho, state lawmakers seem hellbent on driving the predators back to brink of extirpation.

The Idaho Legislature this week created a wolf depredation control board controlled by anti-wildlife interests. The board will administer a $400,000 fund set up explicitly to kill wolves. Conservation advocates say the new law could result in the slaughter of 500 wolves, leaving just 150 in the state. Continue reading

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 7,852 other followers