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Study: No proof that medical marijuana increases teen use

Researchers say legalized medical marijuana does not lead to increased pot smoking among teens.

‘We are confident that marijuana use by teenagers does not increase when a state legalizes medical marijuana’

By Summit Voice

SUMMIT COUNTY — It may be counterintuitive, but an extensive study by researchers at three universities concludes there’s no link between the legalization of medical marijuana to increased use of the drug among high school students.

Statistics do show that teen marijuana use has been rising since 2005, but the study suggests that increase is due to other factors, not the recent growth of the medical marijuana industry.

“There is anecdotal evidence that medical marijuana is finding its way into the hands of teenagers, but there’s no statistical evidence that legalization increases the probability of use,” said Daniel I. Rees, a professor of economics at the University of Colorado Denver. Continue reading

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Study: Legal medical marijuana cuts traffic deaths

A new study by Colorado-based researchers suggests a link between the legalization of medical marijuana and a drop in traffic deaths.

Beer consumption also down in states that have legalized medical cannabis use

By Summit Voice

SUMMIT COUNTY — A new study out of the University of Colorado Denver suggests traffic deaths have dropped 9 percent and beer sales have declined by 5 percent in states where medical marijuana has been legalized.

The in-depth analysis of 13 states that legalized medical marijuana between 1990 and 2009 also indicates that marijuana consumption among minors did not increase as a result of the legalization of medical marijuana. Alcohol consumption by 20- to 29-year-olds went down in the states that legalized medical cannabis, resulting in fewer deaths on the road. The study is online here.

“Our research suggests that the legalization of medical marijuana reduces traffic fatalities through reducing alcohol consumption by young adults,” said Daniel Rees, professor of economics at the University of Colorado Denver who co-authored the study with D. Mark Anderson, assistant professor of economics at Montana State University. Continue reading

Colorado professor questions anti-terror security zones

A Colorado architecture professor says anti-terror security measures can blight urban landscapes.

35 percent of New York’s civic center zone is under restricted access

By Summit Voice

SUMMIT COUNTY — Anti-terror security zones are blighting the landscape and creating an “architecture of fear” — without much evidence that they actually improve safety, according to University of Colorado Denver professor Jeremy Németh.

Németh pointed out that no amount of anti-terror architecture would have stopped the 9/11 attacks, or the Madrid or London subway bombings. “Our most open, public cities are becoming police states … And by limiting access and closing off space, we limit the potential for more eyes on the street to catch possible acts in the process.” Continue reading

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