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Morning photo: Vistas

Wide angle magic

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Sunset over the Divide.

FRISCO — After a few days of scrunching in close to ice formations, laying belly down in slush and gravel beside the streams, it felt good to step back, figuratively and literally, and shoot some wide-open vistas. After editing the moonrise shot, I decided to go back through the archives and look for a few other wide angle images to complement the shot of the day. Here’s what I came up with. Please visit our online gallery at Fine Art America for more Summit County landscape and nature images. Continue reading

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Morning photo: Low winter sun

Creekside again …

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Starburst sunrise along the Snake River.

FRISCO — The sun’s path across the sky is quickly dropping, noticeably in a different position than just a couple of weeks ago, when I ventured to the Snake River for the first time this season in search of ice. Along with shorter days, those changes create opportunities for photography, as if a new lighting designer is on the job. After shooting into the morning sun, I also went for a quick afternoon stroll along Meadow Creek, near our home in Frisco, during the afternoon, hoping to catch some glints of warm sunlight on the remnant ice (yes, remnant; it’s been so warm the past few days that some of the ice is vanishing in our November thaw). Here are the best of today’s images. Please visit our online gallery at Fine Art America for more Summit County landscape and nature images. Continue reading

Morning photo: Creek shots!

Still chasing ice …

Peru Creek Colorado

Such great variation in hue and shape in this modest little ice ledge along Peru Creek.

FRISCO — Until I started visiting local creeks to take pictures of icy waterfalls, I had no idea how much the ice could change just from day to day. And, don’t worry, I don’t spend all day, every day — usually it’s just an hour or so in the morning, which doubles as the daily dog walk. But seriously, depending on the temperatures the night before, the formations can completely transform in a 24-hour period. And it looks so different after a fresh snow! Monday morning, I went out a little later than my usual crack-of-dawn patrol to try and catch the ice with direct sunlight, hoping to get some translucence … Please visit our online gallery at Fine Art America for more Summit County landscape and nature images. Continue reading

Morning photo: Morning, noon & night …

Friday fotos

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Summit County sunrise.

FRISCO —A lot of times, the morning photo set is compiled from different sessions on different days, but today’s all are from a single day. Before dawn on Friday morning, I could see a wave cloud setting up over the Divide, a little higher and farther west than usual, but it still looked like it could catch that morning sunrise glow, so I headed down to the Meadow Creek wetlands to take it in, and to let the dogs romp. In the middle of the day, the same peaks were bathed in bright sunshine — almost too bright for a good picture, and later in the afternoon, I set out to try and get a waterfall shot with a little more light, to try and avoid that blue glow (which can be nice, but it gets old). And the sunset? It was out of this world! Please visit our online gallery at Fine Art America for more Summit County landscapes. Continue reading

Morning photo: November!

An early winter feeling …

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Snake River ice with an ethereal glow as the first few rays of morning sun penetrate the shadows of the canyon.

FRISCO —Every now and then I post a photo set that probably doesn’t need a whole lot of verbiage, except may to say that nature continually, every single day, totally blows my mind. The ice formations along our local streams and creeks change from day to day, and the light is never the same. Even if a morning looks the same, superficially, as the day before; even if I go back to the same spot at the exact same time, it’s different. That’s not to say I don’t work for some of these images. Sometimes I’m wading in icy water up to my ankles, trying to find a stable spot for the tripod. Sometimes the tripod just won’t work, so I look for flat rocks, use a hat or glove as a pad and press the camera tightly to try and prevent shaking during exposures long exposures. And other times, I just point the iPhone and shoot … Visit our online gallery at Fine Art America for more Colorado landscape images. Continue reading

Morning photo: Best of October

Classic Colorado …

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October skies over the Continental Divide in Summit County, Colorado.

FRISCO —October is definitely one of my favorite months for photography in the Colorado high country. Along with the changing leaves, we usually get our first snowfalls, and the shifting hemispheric weather patterns often bring spectacular wave cloud formations over the Continental Divide. Frost and ice start to form along streams and lakes, and sometimes we even get warm, summer-like days. Here are a few of my favorite shots from the past few weeks. Please visit the online Summit Voice gallery at Fine Art America for more Summit County landscapes. Continue reading

Morning photo: Freezing up!

Fall fading to winter …

Winter river

The first rays of dawn burst into the cool blue shadows of the Snake River Canyon.

FRISCO —A couple of snowy days with temperatures hovering around the freezing mark can make all the difference in the waning days of October. At 9,000 feet, it suddenly feels more like winter than fall. The trees are bare and on the shady hillsides the snow probably won’t melt until March or April. And unless we get one of those bombshell sunrises or sunsets, it can be a little challenging for photographers when skies are gray all day. For me, it’s time to head for the creeks, where the ice is forming ever-changing, ephemeral sculptures. Please visit the online Summit Voice gallery at Fine Art America for more Summit County landscapes. Continue reading

Morning photo: Hot-n-cold

Contrasts …

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So what do you call an upside-down icicle?

FRISCO —Trying to cover the spectrum from the coldest blues to the warmest reds in this photo set made me reach back into the archives for a few summer sunset and sunrise pics to intersperse with the recent ice shots in the Snake River Basin. It’s pretty amazing to me to see the contrasts in the natural world from day to day and season to season. Of course, a lot of days are more in-between, but we won’t talk about those. Please visit the online Summit Voice gallery at Fine Art America for more Summit County landscapes. Continue reading

Morning photo: Early ice

Snake River scenes

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Just above the Blight Placer, the Snake River dances between shadows and early morning sunlight. The trick, for a photographer, is to find the balance.

FRISCO — With most of the brilliant fall colors waning, I decided to trek up along the Snake River, between Keystone and Montezuma, a few weeks earlier than usual to check out the ice formations and to see if this time of year might be good for perfecting my frozen waterfall photography skills. As usual, the Snake didn’t disappoint — in the shadowy canyon, the boulders are already coated with luminous ice, and a couple of hours after sunrise, the lighting was pretty good, bright enough to banish the murky blue shadows, but dark enough to allow for slower shutter speeds to blur the water. Check out the Summit Voice online gallery at Fine Art America more more Summit County landscape photography. Continue reading

Summit County: Should hazmat trucks use I-70?

Installation of fire suppression system in the Eisenhower-Johnson Tunnels could spur discussion on hazmat routing

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Hazmat routes are ubiquitous along Colorado’s major highways.

By Bob Berwyn

FRISCO — With $25 million in funding secured for a long-sought fire suppression system in the I-70 Eisenhower-Johnson Tunnels, a debate over hazmat routing through Summit County could heat up again. In a first step, CDOT will start a process to update the 1980s-era rules for the tunnel, potentially opening the door to a petition process that could result in changes to the hazmat route.

Currently, gasoline tankers and nearly all other hazardous materials are routed via U.S. Highway 6 over windy Loveland Pass, where tankers frequently roll over and spill fuel. Most truckers would prefer to haul their flammable, toxic and explosive materials through the tunnel and down I-70 to save time and money, but local emergency responders aren’t sure if the change makes sense from a public safety standpoint.

“This is going to require some very careful evaluation,” said Summit County emergency services director Joel Cochran, acknowledging that there have already been some behind-the-scenes discussions among some stakeholders. Continue reading

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