Morning photo: Snake River VII

Alpine streams

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Near the headwater of Peru Creek, along the Continental Divide.

FRISCO — A little photographic jaunt through one of my favorite Colorado basins, the Snake River drainage, between Keystone and Arapahoe Basin. Summit Voice photography is for sale at our online Fine Art America gallery. Check it! Continue reading

Morning photo: Deep greens and blues …

Sunlight, ice, water …

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A sunburst sunrise above Deer Creek, in Summit County, Colorado.

FRISCO — A Saturday morning sortie east of Keystone in the Snake River Basin yielded a few more decent images, with dappled and buttery sunlight contrasting with the deep shadows and rich blue-greens of the mountain streams. Continue reading

Colorado: Pennsylvania Mine cleanup set to begin

EPA removal action aims to reduce acid mine drainage at polluted site

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The ruins of the abandoned Pennsylvania Mine.

USGS and EPA experts sample soils near the Pennsylvania Mine.

USGS and EPA experts sample soils near the Pennsylvania Mine.

By Bob Berwyn

FRISCO — After years of study, state and federal mine reclamation experts say they’re ready to try and reduce the amount of tainted water oozing out of the abandoned Pennsylvania Mine, in Summit County, Colorado.

The old mining site high in the Peru Creek drainage above Keystone has been identified as a key source of toxic heavy metals that impair water quality for miles downstream. Concentrations of lead, cadmium, managanese and especially zinc exceed standards set to protect aquatic life in the stream.

The mine operated between 1879 and 1908, and intermittently through the 1940s, producing gold, silver, lead, copper and zinc. As water and oxygen interact with the highly mineralized rocks, so-called acid mine drainage forms, loading the stream with dissolved heavy metals. Continue reading

Morning photo: Winter faves

Spring is coming …

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A fragile structure of inch-long hoar frost crystals grow in a shady spot along the shoreline of Dillon Reservoir on the north side of the Frisco Peninsula.

FRISCO —There may not be any wildflowers during winter in Summit County, but there’s no shortage of spectacular colors and textures, from gleaming ice to the warm tones of winter sunset and moonrise. With the impending change of seasons, I thought it was a good time to look back and choose a few of the all-time best winter landscapes. If you like what you see, visit our Summit County gallery online at FineArt America, where you can buy high quality prints or greeting cards. They make great gifts, and it’s one of the best ways to support our independent online journalism project.

A December full moon rises over the Continental Divide.

A December full moon rises over the Continental Divide.

Continue reading

Morning photo: The hand of man

Not all natural …

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Buffalo Mountain from the Frisco Nordic Center at dawn.

FRISCO — As it started to get light Thursday morning I glanced out the kitchen window and noticed a thick layer of low-lying fog over part of Frisco Bay. That seemed a bit unusual since the reservoir has been frozen over for a few weeks, and the fog generally stops forming after the ice thickens up. So after getting my son off to school, I jumped in the car and headed up Highway 9 toward Breckenridge. It didn’t take long to discover the source of the fog. The snow-making machines at the Frisco Nordic Center and tubing hill were going all out, and with an atmospheric inversion in place, the frozen mists from the nozzles were being pushed down and out across the Reservoir. Continue reading

Morning photo: Meditation

Seeking balance …

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A frozen beaver pond along the Snake River and the surrounding snowbanks show an astonishing variety of blue tones.

FRISCO — During the past few weeks photographing along the Snake River, I found myself thinking a lot about the balance between light and shadow, and even more, trying to balance the brilliant winter sunlight with the cool green and blue shadows of the forest. In part, it’s a question of timing; setting up in the right spot when there’s just enough half-light filtering in to show some detail. In other shots, I tried to play the light against the dark, creating drama and interest from the contrasts. Some shots work, some don’t but it’s always worth the effort.

This was the scene that really crystallized the idea of light and dark as the yin and yang of a photographic meditation.

This was the scene that really crystallized the idea of light and dark as the yin and yang of a photographic meditation.

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The iPhone Instagram app helped add more contrast to this view.

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A bit too much light on the foreground, with some of the details burned out, but the half-light on the shadowed creek has great depth.

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Light-play.

 

 

 

 

Morning photo: Forest light

Sun and shadow …

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The first few rays of sun shine into the dark reaches of the Snake River Canyon.

FRISCO — I headed up to the Snake River between Keystone and Montezuma again Thursday morning for a quick photo session, once again trying to find the perfect balance between the bright light on the snow and the cool blue shadows of the forest. It’s not an easy thing to photograph — what the eye takes in, the lens has a hard time capturing. I’ve found that it’s best to look for the half-light, in between the full sun and the shadows, where the blues are partially displaced by the warmer hues of the rising sun, or to go for the strong contrast, like sunlit trees against a dark forest or a shadow background. When I first started shooting and processing these images, I was always tempted to lighten up the shadows, but even with Photoshop, it just doesn’t look right. In this set, I decided to go with the deep blues, which add an element of mystery.

Many of the photos in Summit Voice photo essays are available in our Fine Art America online gallery, and there’s also Summit County gallery at our ImageKind website. You can also order images by contacting me at bberwyn@comcast.net. It’s a great way to support independent online journalism. Continue reading

Morning photo: Solstice!

First day of winter

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Early morning rays illuminate an icescape along the Snake River.

FRISCO — To get some good solstice images, I headed back to the Snake River valley, between Keystone and Montezuma, knowing that the sun would rise almost directly above the water. The cold temps of the last few nights have helped build up intricate new ice terraces and ice dams and the rays slanting through the trees helped give the canyon a wintry glow. I took my iPhone, too, because the sensor on the little camera phone actually does a better job of picking up shadow details in a backlit scene. See if you can tell which of these pics was taken with the iPhone, and which ones with the D80.

Many of the images in Summit Voice photo essays are available in our Fine Art America online gallery, and there’s also Summit County gallery at our ImageKind website. You can also order images by contacting me directly at bberwyn@comcast.net. It’s a great way to support independent online journalism! Continue reading

Morning photo: Second look

Snake River revisited

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Shadow and light.

FRISCO — Last night I went back to clean out a couple of weeks worth of pictures from the archive because if I don’t do it on a regular basis, it becomes a daunting chore. I knew I had a bunch of good shots from two recent early morning shooting sessions along the Snake River, but I also new that some of those images were candidates for deletion. A few others were in between, and those are the images I tried to “rescue” with a big of post-processing. Continue reading

Morning photo: Along the Snake

Frosty morning …

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Made it to the river in time to set up for this shot — a pale winter sun finally climbing over the ridgetop just before 9 a.m.

FRISCO — Most of the valleys in our part of the Rockies trend north-south, which means that sun sets and rises behind mountains to the east and west. But the Snake River Valley trends generally east-west, and that means that the morning sunlight flows into the canyon rather dramatically, filtering through the tall pines and glinting off the snow and ice along the river. On a recent frost-hunting excursion, I stopped at a few spots along the stream, looking for exactly the right angles to capture the sunrise drama. Continue reading

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