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Climate: Last summer’s Greenland ice sheet surface meltdown linked with an unusual kink in the jet stream

July 2012 melt event far surpassed previous record

In the images above, areas classified as “probable melt” (light pink) correspond to sites where at least one satellite detected surface melting. Areas classified as “melt” (dark pink) correspond to sites where two or three satellites detected melting.

In the images above, areas classified as “probable melt” (light pink) correspond to sites where at least one satellite detected surface melting. Areas classified as “melt” (dark pink) correspond to sites where two or three satellites detected melting.

By Summit Voice

SUMMIT COUNTY — Along with an unusual constellation of low clouds, changes the jet stream were also a factor in last summer’s exceptional surface melt of the Greenland Ice Sheet, according to a research team led by the University of Sheffield’s geography professor Edward Hanna.

A NOAA study published in March indicated that a lingering layer of thin, low clouds helped intensify atmospheric conditions leading to the meltdown.

Hanna and his colleagues used a computer model simulation (called SnowModel) and satellite data to confirm that last summer’s meltdown was unprecedented in the past 50 years. About 90 percent of the ice-sheet surface melted July 11, far surpassing the previous known surface melt extent record of 52 percent in 2010. Continue reading

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