Morning photo: Springtime in the Rockies

Bursting forth …

FRISCO —The Colorado high country is spectacular any time of year, but spring is my favorite season. It’s the time of year when you can still ski on the mountains, often in some of the best snow of the year. But down in the valleys, Mother Nature is busy building a new season. Since the mountain growing season is so short, spring comes in a hurry. Plants don’t have the luxury of taking their time if they want to bloom and produce flowers and seeds for reproduction, so everything seems to pop all at once with a fecundity that’s as astounding as it is reassuring.

For daily photography updates, follow our Instagram feed, and visit our online gallery for an amazing selection of prints and greeting cards.

Morning photo: Welcome, spring

Celebrate the season!


FRISCO —We’re stepping into spring here in the Colorado high country, and right on schedule, the first western bluebirds appeared on the fringes of local forests. There are other signs as well — reflective meltwater ponds along the edge of Dillon Reservoir and budding willow shrubs. Stop whatever you’re doing today for at least a few minutes to get outside and celebrate the changing of the seasons!

Morning photo: Monday magic …

Half-light


FRISCO —During a month when Colorado’s snowpack should be getting deeper, I’ve been tracking the rapidly vanishing Rocky Mountain snowpack, quickly turning to rotten mush under temps that have consistently ranged between 5 and 15 degrees Fahrenheit above average. I’m not complaining too much. I love spring and the warm, buttery light does magical things with the snowpack, but as an environmental reporter covering global warming, I am concerned. It’s not just the past few weeks that have been unusually warm. Temperatures have been running well above average for most of the winter, at least here in Summit County, and if this is the new normal, it spells big trouble.

Morning photo: Vibrant

Winter skies over Summit County


FRISCO —Morning or evening, the skies over Summit County rarely disappoint. Mountain light, snow, clouds … it all combines to create sometimes surreal vistas of colors and shapes. As often as I’ve photographed Peak 1, our Frisco landmark, I’m still amazed at how different the light can be from one day, or even one hour, to the next. Follow our Instagram feed for daily updates, and visit the online Summit Voice gallery at Fine Art America to see more Summit County nature and landscape images.

Morning photo: Best of spring 2014

Snowy days …


FRISCO —A few more of our favorite images from 2014, focusing on late winter and early spring, when the deepest snowpack of the years begins its inexorable meltdown. And while most people are enjoying daffodils and tulips, Summit County, at 9,000 feet, usually sees at least one or two snowstorms during the late spring, even down to the valley elevations. Follow our Instagram feed for daily updates, and visit the online Summit Voice gallery at Fine Art America to see more Summit County nature and landscape images.

Morning photo: Solstice!

Winter begins …


FRISCO — Once more, our Blue Marble has slipped into another celestial phase, marking the northern hemisphere’s maximum tilt away from the sun. The low sun angle often helps create dramatic landscapes, as the snow takes on an otherwordly glow, enveloping the mountains with soft light and long shadows. Enjoy the season!

Morning photo: Sunday set

Flashback …

sdfg

A slice of skyline along the shore of Dillon Reservoir in Frisco, Colorado.

FRISCO — I figured that, before winter really gets rolling would be a good time to clean up the photo archives, which meant going back through the autumn months and trying to keep the number of images to a somewhat manageable size. Plus, looking back at the images of the most recent season is a good reality check for the weather. Our day-to-day memory can play tricks, but photos don’t lie. We enjoyed a spectacular autumn in the Colorado high country, with just a bit of early snow, but generally mild weather through September and especially in late October, when a few weeks with temps running 10 to 15 degrees above normal made many people wonder if winter would ever show up. Continue reading

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 8,837 other followers