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Colorado hunter fined $5,177 for killing moose

Conviction could lead to permanent loss of hunting privileges

A Colorado hunter must pay a $5,177 fine for mistakenly shooting a moose.

By Summit Voice

SUMMIT COUNTY — A Highlands Ranch man was sentenced to three years of supervised probation and ordered to pay a $5,177 fine after pleading guilty to shooting a moose (thinking it was an elk) and failing to report it to the Colorado Division of Wildlife. The case highlights a growing concern for Colorado wildlife managers — hunters who fail to correctly identify big game animals.

Joel D. Eady, 30, was charged with willful destruction of wildlife – a Class 5 felony, as well as hunting out of season, illegal possession of wildlife and failing to properly care for a harvested animal.

During an October 2010 hunting trip in the Missouri Creek Basin, east of Meeker, Eady mistakenly shot a cow moose after misidentifying it as an elk. According to witnesses, Eady told those at the scene that he would turn himself in, but never did.

“The biggest concern here is that Mr. Eady never reported this to us,” said District Wildlife Manager and lead investigator Jon Wangnild.  “We understand that mistakes happen and we will usually be more lenient with someone who reports an accident right away, but failing to report this incident turned a careless mistake into a felony.” Continue reading

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Colorado: Snowmobilers harassing moose, posting videos

CDOW targets snowmobile rental companies with awareness campaign

Moose near Berthoud Pass, Colorado.

A moose cow and her calves graze in thick willows near Berthoud Pass.

By Summit Voice

SUMMIT COUNTY — Some snowmobilers in Colorado are chasing and harassing moose in the backcountry and then posting videos on social video web sites, according to the Colorado Division of Wildlife, which is launching an awareness campaign aimed at curbing the practice.

The message is targeting snowmobilers and snowmobile rental companies on the West Slope. Wildlife officers will be contacting snowmobile rental companies and providing them with literature that can be distributed to customers.

Although it is unclear where some of the videos were shot, at least one of them was taken in Grand County. The footage shows an unidentified person on a snowmobile chasing a moose at a high rate of speed. The moose then stops and appears to charge the rider before running away.  Although no one was reported to have been injured in this incident, officials are concerned that behavior like this could lead to injuries or death of moose and snowmobilers. Continue reading

The year in video: top 10 for 2010

Four of the most viewed videos from 2010 were from Copper Mountain Sunsation in April.  This immensely popular music festival featured some top-notch acts.  All of the videos can be viewed at the Summit Voice YouTube channel.  A link to this channel can also be found on the right sidebar.

  1. Pepper at Copper Mountain Sunsation, April 10, 2010
  2. Passafire at Copper Mountain Sunsation, April 10, 2010
  3. Lighting of Breckenridge, December 4, 2010
  4. Sunsation at Copper Mountain, Colorado, April 10, 2010
  5. Moose sighting on Peak 7, Breckenridge, Colorado
  6. A Mushroom Foray in Summit County, Colorado
  7. Historic Engine #9 returns to Breckenridge, Colorado, 12-14-2010
  8. Breckenridge Ski Area, November 16, 2010
  9. A Moose and Her Calf in Breckenridge, Colorado
  10. Copper Sunsation April 18, 2010

My own personal favorite came in at #9, “A Moose and Her Calf”.  I was standing at my kitchen window early one morning last March and I saw the moose standing at the end of my driveway.  I dashed for my camera and by the time I got back with it, she had moved into the back yard, and it was then that I saw that she was accompanied by her calf.  Since my deck is well above the level of the yard, I was able to stand on the deck and take video of them without disturbing them.  It was a wonderful moment for me and I’m so glad I was able to capture it.

Moose shootings prompt CDOW warning

A moose cow and two calves graze near the headwaters of the Fraser River in Grand County. PHOTO BY BOB BERWYN.

Hunters need to be sure of their target before pulling the trigger; mistaken kills could lead to serious fines

By Summit Voice

SUMMIT COUNTY — Halfway through the fall rifle season, hunters in Colorado have carelessly or negligently shot 10 moose, spurring Colorado Division of Wildlife game managers to warn big game hunters to be more careful before pulling the trigger. Otherwise, they could face stiff penalties.

“We’re seeing way too many preventable mistakes,” said Ron Velarde, DOW’s Northwest Regional Manager. “If you aren’t 100 percent sure that what you have in your sights is what you have on your license, do not pull the trigger.”  Continue reading

Hunters: Don’t shoot a moose by mistake

These are moose -- not elk! PHOTO BY BOB BERWYN.

Spotting scopes, binoculars can help hunters recognize the distinctive differences between the two species.

By Summit Voice

SUMMIT COUNTY — As Colorado‘s big game hunting season begins, the Colorado Division of Wildlife is asking hunters to learn the difference between moose and elk in order to avoid accidentally shooting moose.

Almost every year moose are accidentally killed, according to the state wildlife agency. The most common error is mistaking a cow moose for a cow elk.

Moose are the largest members of the deer family and have adapted to a variety of habitats. They favor willows along streams and ponds. But be aware, some moose also inhabit lodgepole pine, oak brush, aspen, spruce, fir and even sagebrush – in other words, the same areas where elk live. Moose can be found in almost all the high-country areas of Colorado.

Elk hunters need to be sure to know the difference between these two ungulates. If a hunter without the proper license shoots a moose, the fine can be more than $1,000. Continue reading

Grand Mesa to celebrate ‘Moose Day”

Colorado's largest mammal is establishing a self-sustaining population on the Grand Mesa. PHOTO COURTESY COLORADO DIVISION OF WILDLIFE.

Large ungulates thriving in various parts of Colorado; see some video clips of moose in Summit County at the Summit Voice YouTube channel

By Summit Voice

SUMMIT COUNTY — With the Grand Mesa moose herd at 150 animals and growing, The Colorado Division of Wildlife and residents of the area have teamed up celebrate the big critters with a day of their own.

Saturday, July 31, is Grand Mesa Moose Day, with moose viewing information, presentations about moose biology and moose history, presentations on how biologists transplant and track moose, and even a puppet show, all from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the U.S. Forest Service visitor center atop Grand Mesa on Highway 65.

“Moose sightings are always fun for people and they’re becoming more common on the Grand Mesa as the population grows,” said Trina Romero, Colorado Division of Wildlife Watchable Wildlife Coordinator. “This event will teach people safe ways to see the moose and some great facts about moose in Colorado.” Continue reading

VIDEO: A moose among us

This afternoon I and some of my neighbors were treated to the sight of a moose grazing in the willows in the wetlands along Barton Road on Peak 7, Breckenridge.

I was returning from today’s hike and I had my video camera in my pack, so here’s a short clip. Check out the Summit Voice YouTube channel here.

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