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Morning photo: Fire and ice

Incredible contrasts in Iceland

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The moon rises over the Svartsengi power plant and the Blue Lagoon, near Grindavik, Iceland. Once the geothermally heated was has served its purpose generating electricity, its funneled into the nearby lava beds, supplying water for the world-famous spa and pool.

FRISCO — More than any other country, Iceland has access to incredible amounts of geothermal energy, used to heat entire communities and to produce electricity. Often, the super-heated water spews or bubbles from the ground close to the ice-clad mountains. In fact, the water running off the glaciers is an important part of the geothermal cycles, as it trickles down through the faults in the Earth’s crust — which is cracked and split to begin with in this region — only to be heated by seething magma, and then rising to the surface. The fascinating juxtaposition of fire and ice is one of the most appealing facets of this wind-whipped island in the North Atlantic. Continue reading

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Morning photo: Oh, Reykjavik!

Far north …

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Looking over the roofs of Reykjavik from the cathedral in the city center on a blustery September day.

By Bob Berwyn

FRISCO —We really didn’t know what to expect, exactly, from Reykjavik. With its close links to Scandinavia and North America, Iceland may not be the most exotic of countries, but it’s remote North Atlantic location on an ice-capped volcanic island made us wonder what we’d find during a recent week-long visit to the northernmost capital in the world. Continue reading

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