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Sen. Mark Udall votes against assault weapons ban

Colorado lawmaker says bill was too broad, bu supports expanded background checks and limits on high-capacity ammo clips

Sen. Mark Udall said Coloradans are entitled under the second amendment to own weapons that can be used to commit mass murder.

Sen. Mark Udall says Coloradans are entitled under the Second Amendment to own weapons that can be used to commit mass murders.

By Bob Berwyn

FRISCO— Facing reelection next year, Sen. Mark Udall (D-CO) this week voted against a proposed ban on assault weapons, saying the measure was too broad for his gun-toting Colorado constituents.

Udall did support a background check bill, which failed when four Democratic senators, all up for reelection next year, voted against it. According to many polls, more than 90 percent of Americans support stronger background checks.

Udall dusted off the Second Amendment and said, “Coloradans, including sportsmen, hunters and responsible gun owners, agree that we need to keep dangerous military-style weapons off of our streets and out of places like our schools and movie theaters. Continue reading

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Summit County man faces charges after handgun threats

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Summit County resident Dale Montagne, 62, has been charged with felony menacing after threatening several men with a handgun and allegedly firing a shot.

Sheriff’s deputies arrest Dale Montagne after altercation over leased apartment

By Summit Voice

FRISCO — The Summit County Sheriff’s Office Thursday arrested a local man after he allegedly threatened four men with a handgun and fired a shot at the feet of one of the men after a disagreement over a rental lockoff unit.

According to a release from the sheriff’s office, Dale Montagne, 62, was booked into the Summit County Jail on charges of: Prohibited Use of Weapons, a Class 2 Misdemeanor; Reckless Endangerment, a Class 3 Misdemeanor; four counts of Menacing/Intimidation, a Class 5 Felony; and 1st Degree Burglary Assault/Menacing, a Class 3 Felony. Continue reading

Colorado’s congressional delegation eyes gun control

Sen. Mark Udall: “We simply must do everything we can to ensure these military-grade weapons are never in the hands of those who would turn them against their community.”

By Summit Voice

SUMMIT COUNTY — As political momentum for addressing gun violence grows, U.S. Sen. Mark Udall came out in favor of a ban on military grade weapons as part of a comprehensive approach to tackling the problem.

Congressman Ed Perlmutter, representing Colorado’s 7th Congressional District, has already announced that he will introduce a bill that would ban assault weapons.

“It’s time to do more. It is Congress’ responsibility to lead, and it’s time for me to take action,” Perlmutter said in a statement. “This is about crime control and doing what we can to deter and prevent the kinds of tragedies we’ve experienced all too often in the last few years. Continue reading

Op-ed: Act now to end gun violence

Bob Berwyn.

In the wake of Aurora murders, Hickenlooper claims we live in a safe country, but outside a war zone, your best chance of being shot is in any major American city

By Bob Berwyn

SUMMIT COUNTY — Waking to the news of the mass shooting in Aurora brought back haunting memories of 9/11, when the first few hours of the day also passed in a dizzying blur of glimpses at CNN, interspersed with caring for my lively four-year-old.

Friday morning, my thoughts again immediately turned to my son, who was not in the house as the news unfolded, but thankfully far away from Aurora, safely attending a camp at Copper Mountain.

We’ve been to a few midnight movie premieres here in Summit County in recent years, time that was always filled with pleasant anticipation, so I was able to imagine the vibe in the theater last night before the show started.

What I can’t even begin to imagine is the feeling of horror that must have prevailed in the moments when the shooting started, nor the indescribable grief that families of victims are feeling.

As I watched the first few hours of news coverage, I could see an all-too familiar pattern emerging, with initial details about the shooter, the victims, the police response, and finally, reaction and statements from elected officials.

What was missing was a sense of outrage that, in this day and age, an individual can amass that sort of arsenal and use it to do unspeakable harm in a public place. Some of that outrage surfaced here and there in a few sound bites and interviews, but the overall sense of the coverage was, here we go again, and when will it end? Continue reading

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