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Climate: Texas school board tries to include anti-science message in new textbooks

New books include misleading passages about climate science

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Warmer than average temps prevailed around most of the globe in October 2014, according to NASA’s evaluation of the latest satellite data.

Staff Report

FRISCO —New textbooks under consideration for Texas schools may mislead students when it comes to climate science, the American Meteorological Society said in a Nov. 3 letter to the state’s board of education. The group says that several social studies textbooks being considered for classroom use include factual errors. Continue reading

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Environment: South Dakota Native Americans describe House vote on Keystone XL pipeline as an ‘act of war’

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War over the Keystone XL pipeline?

‘We are a sovereign nation and we are not being treated as such … We will close our reservation borders to Keystone XL’

By Summit Voice

FRISCO — Conservation groups and climate activists aren’t the only ones hopping mad about the Congressional rush to approve the Keystone XL pipeline. Native Americans in South Dakota say they consider last week’s House vote to approve the pipeline “an act of war.”

The proposed project, aimed at pumping tar sands crude oil from Canada to U.S. refineries, would completely cross South Dakota. Environmentalists oppose the pipeline because it represents continued reliance on fossil fuels. Most, if not all, of the oil would be exported to other countries, so the argument that it would somehow lower fuel prices rings hollow and false. Continue reading

Global warming: Oceans at all-time record high temps

Pacific Ocean is cooking, even without El Niño

NOAA Sea Surface Temperature anomaly (with respect to period 1854-2013) averaged over global oceans (red) and over North Pacific (0-60oN, 110oE-100oW) (cyan). September 2014 temperatures broke the record for both global and North Pacific Sea Surface Temperatures. b) Sea Surface Temperature anomaly of September 2014 from NOAA's ERSST dataset. Credit: Axel Timmermann

NOAA Sea Surface Temperature anomaly (with respect to period 1854-2013) averaged over global oceans (red) and over North Pacific (0-60oN, 110oE-100oW) (cyan). September 2014 temperatures broke the record for both global and North Pacific Sea Surface Temperatures. b) Sea Surface Temperature anomaly of September 2014 from NOAA’s ERSST dataset.
Credit: Axel Timmermann.

Staff Report

FRISCO — Global ocean temperatures have soared to the highest level in recorded history this year, and the rate of warming has accelerated since April, according to scientists with the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

“This summer has seen the highest global mean sea surface temperatures ever recorded since their systematic measuring started,” said Axel Timmermann, a climate scientist at the university’s International Pacific Research Center. “Temperatures even exceed those of the record-breaking 1998 El Niño year,” Timmermann said, adding that the new data analysis shows that the global warming pause, if there was one, is over.

“The 2014 global ocean warming is mostly due to the North Pacific, which has warmed far beyond any recorded value,” he said, adding that the temperature trend in the Pacific has shifted hurricane tracks, weakened trade winds, and bleached corals around the Hawaiian Islands. Continue reading

Will federal agencies start taking climate seriously in analyzing proposals for public lands?

Coal, in this day and age? Really?

Coal, in this day and age? Really?

Lack of appeal in Colorado coal mining case may signal change of direction

By Summit Voice

FRISCO — Federal resource managers may be inclined to take a closer look at the climate impacts of projects on national forests and BLM lands, after the Obama administration decided not to challenge a recent federal district court ruling on Colorado coal mining leases. Continue reading

Climate: 4th-warmest October on record for U.S.

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East-west split not as dramatic in autumn

Staff Report

FRISCO — October 2014 ended up as the fourth-warmest on record, at 3 degrees Fahrenheit above the long-term average, federal weather watchers said today in the monthly climate update from the National Climatic Data Center.

Autumn continued showing the persistent east-west split that is part of an ongoing drought pattern in the Far West. From Texas and Oklahoma to California, most states reported average October temperatures running near record levels, along with a slice of New England. Average temps reigned across the Midwest, with another belt of warmer-than-average readings in the Southeast. Continue reading

Climate: Groundwater temps also going up

Runoff in North Tenmile Creek, Summit County Colorado.

Runoff in North Tenmile Creek, Summit County Colorado.

Rise in groundwater temps reflects surface temperature record

Staff Report

FRISCO — Decades of detailed temperature measurements from around the globe show how the thickening blanket of heat-trapping greenhouse gas pollutants is steadily raising surface and water temperatures, but until recently, there hasn’t been a lot of information about ground water. Now, scientists with ETH Zurich say groundwater temperature profiles echo those of the atmosphere, albeit damped and delayed.

For their study, the researchers used uninterrupted long-term temperature measurements of groundwater flows around the cities of Cologne and Karlsruhe, where the operators of the local waterworks have been measuring the temperature of the groundwater for 40 years. Continue reading

Climate: Robotic gliders probe secrets of Southern Ocean

Detailed measurements to help pinpoint rate of ice shelf melt

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Melting Antarctica ice shelves are raising global sea level. bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

FRISCO — The Southern Ocean, surrounding Antarctica, is mostly separated from the rest of the world’s oceans by a sharp temperature boundary and swift currents. But the border between the different masses of water is regularly blurred by giant swirls of water that may be transporting warmer water to the edge of the frozen continent.

Knowing how that process works could help scientists understand how fast Antarctic ice shelves will melt and raise global sea level, according to Caltech scientists who used robotic gliders to track the movement of water in the region. Continue reading

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