Warmer oceans lead to more extreme coastal rainstorms

Study tracks eastern Mediterranean climate trends

This image shows simulated precipitation (over 24 hours from 6 to 7 July 2012) of a model run using observed sea surface temperature (a) and (b) using a colder SST representative of the early 1980s). The black cross marks the town of Krymsk, the thin black lines are height contours with a distance of 150 metres.

This image shows simulated precipitation (over 24 hours from 6 to 7 July 2012) of a model run using observed sea surface temperature (a) and (b) using a colder SST representative of the early 1980s). The black cross marks the town of Krymsk, the thin black lines are height contours with a distance of 150 metres. Graphic courtesy GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre.

Staff Report

FRISCO — Rapidly warming sea surface temperatures are resulting in more extreme coastal rainstorms, Russian and German researchers said after analyzing climate data from the eastern Mediterranean and the Black Sea.

The impetus for the study was a deadly 2012 flash flood in the Russian city of Krymsk, near the Black Sea coast that killed 172 people. The Black Sea and eastern Mediterranean have warmed by about 2 degrees Celsius since the early 1980s.

The study was led led by scientists at the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research in Kiel, Germany, and published in the international journal Nature Geoscience. Continue reading

Spike in extreme rains linked with global warming

Raindrops splashing into a pond in Vail. PHOTO BY DYLAN BERWYN.

A new study documents a distinct increase in extreme rainfall events linked with global warming.

Southeast Asia sees biggest increase in dangerous rainstorms

Staff Report

FRISCO —There’s clear evidence that global warming is causing more frequent record-breaking rainstorms, according to scientists with the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research.

The upward trend in extreme rainfall events has been striking in the last 30 years, and particularly noticeable in Southeast Asia, the researchers said in a new study, explaining that the spike lies outside the range of natural variability.

The worldwide increase is consistent with rising global temperatures, which are caused by greenhouse-gas emissions from burning fossil fuels, the scientists said. Continue reading

Climate: Widespread heatwaves setting all-time temperature records across the northern hemisphere

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Above average temperatures are expected to persist across the Far West for the next three months.

Global warming is here …

Staff Report

FRISCO — With El Niño still strengthening in the Pacific Ocean, many parts of the northern hemisphere are breaking all-time heat record this week, including England, where tennis players in the early Wimbledon rounds have to contend with the hottest temperatures ever recorded in the UK.

The ongoing heatwaves parts of Asia, North America and Europe may be a clear sign that 2015 will, as expected, end up as the hottest year on record for the globe, and a sign of trouble ahead, as deadly heatwaves are expected to increase and put millions of people at risk, with the threat growing every year, according to a recent climate study. Continue reading

Environment: Denver roundtable shows how climate action will benefit Colorado

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Global temperatures have reached record levels the past few months, with 2015 on track to be warmest year ever.

Heat waves, increased air pollution seen as key climate risks for Colorado

Staff Report

FRISCO — A new EPA report suggests that failing to curb greenhouse gas emissions could cause up to 57,000 additional deaths across the U.S. in coming decades due to poor air quality.

The study was released as part of the run-up to the finalization of the controversial Clean Power Plan, which aims to cut greenhouse gas emissions from power plants. The EPA is set to finalize the plan later this summer.

The report’s findings were part of the discussion at a Denver roundtable convened by Environment Colorado this week, as EPA experts joined with state leaders and health experts to bring the message home to Colorado.

“Climate change is already having an impact on human health and is challenging EPA’s ability to fulfill its mission,” said EPA regional climate change coordination Laura Ferris. “We know that taking action to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions will significantly benefit Americans by reducing health impacts, saving lives and avoiding more costly damages across the economy.” Continue reading

Colorado: Flash flood warning covers DIA

Intense thunderstorm drops 2 inches of rain in northeast Denver

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Moisture streaming northeastward across Colorado has triggered another round of heavy thunderstorms.

FRISCO — With rain gages picking up anywhere from 1 to 2.5 inches of rain over northeastern Denver, the National Weather service has issued a flash flood warning for Denver International Airport and surrounding areas.

Flooding is expected in northern Aurora, northeastern Commerce City, Brighton, Denver International Airport’s terminal concourses and Barr Lake.

The flash flood watch is in effect through 9:30 p.m. The NWS is urging people to move to higher ground: “Act quickly to protect your life.” Small creeks and streams will overflow, with danger spots along highways, especially at underpasses.



		

	

Climate: Study says global warming to increase flash flood risks in Australia

High water at the mouth of the Mississippi River, near Venice, Louisiana.

Peak intensity of rainfalls during storms is increasing.

Rising temps are drastically changing rainfall patterns

Staff Report

FRISCO — After carefully analyzing 30 years of rainfall data in Australia, scientists said they tracked a clear pattern of  intensifying peak rainfall during storms that will lead to increased flash flood risks in Australia’s urban catchments.

Civil engineers from the University of New South Wales Water Research Centre analyzed close to 40,000 storms across Australia, finding that warming temperatures are dramatically disrupting rainfall patterns, even within storm events. Continue reading

Widespread flood warnings in Colorado

Hikers, motorists warned about overflowing streams and rivers

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Subtropical moisture streaming into Colorado is triggering more flood concerns.

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Flooding is possible in southwest Colorado, parts of the high country, as well as many Front Range streams.

Staff Report

FRISCO — With more subtropical moisture streaming into Colorado from the Southwest, parts of the state are under flood watches and flood warnings at the start of the weekend, including:

  • South Boulder Creek near Eldorado Springs,
  • Cache La Poudre River near Greeley affecting Weld County.
  • South Platte River at Henderson affecting Adams County.
  • South Platte River near Kersey affecting Weld County.
  • South Platte River near Weldona affecting Morgan County.
  • South Platte River near Balzac affecting Logan, Morgan and
    Washington Counties.

In the high country, the Eagle River is expected to come close to overflowing this weekend, with a flood advisory for the weekend. Other rivers running high include the Roaring Fork between Aspen and Glenwood Springs and the Colorado River from the Eagle/Grand County line to the Utah border. Continue reading

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