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Summit County: Forest Service releases revised plan for 21-mile motorized trail system on Tenderfoot Mountain

Community task force finds common ground on contentious proposal

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The Forest Service says there’s room for 13 miles of new motorized trails on Tenderfoot Mountain, despite the fact that the agency can’t adequately maintain existing trails.

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A family outing near the Dillon Cemetery.

By Bob Berwyn

*Previous Summit Voice stories on the Tenderfoot motorized trail proposal are online here.

FRISCO — Critics are likely to say it’s like putting lipstick on a pig, but the U.S. Forest Service claims its latest version of a plan for a motorized trail on Tenderfoot Mountain, near Dillon, will result in a managed, finite system of sustainable trails to replacing the existing spaghetti network of illegal trails in the area.

The agency this week released a revised environmental study for the controversial trail system, which has been hotly debated for the past several years. According to the Forest Service, the new proposed action represents numerous compromises that were made to mitigate environmental and social concerns. Continue reading

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Outdoors: Forest Service adds ‘new’ trails in Summit County

Some of the "new" trails on national forest lands in Summit County lead to hidden coves along the shore of Dillon Reservoir.

Some of the “new” trails on national forest lands in Summit County lead to hidden coves along the shore of Dillon Reservoir.

Travel management plan update results in some user-created trails becoming an official part of the trail network

By Summit Voice

FRISCO — If you’ve never heard of the Hippo Trail or the Bodhi Trail, don’t feel too bad. Both are newly named trail segments in Summit County that have just recently been formally added to the national forest trail system managed by the U.S. Forest Service’s Dillon Ranger District.

Many of the user-created have been popular with locals for years, but now they’re officially on the map, said Ken Waugh, recreation staff officer for the district.

“Many of these have never been maintained and have not been on District maps,” Waugh said, adding that the Forest Service is making an outreach effort to let hikers and cyclists know about the new trails.

As part of that effort, the Dillon District is preparing Recreation Opportunity Guides for these new trails. The one-page sheets  have a map on one side and information about the trails on the other. When they’re done, they’ll be posted online at this White River National Forest website. Some of the guides are already posted at www.dillonrangerdistrict.com. The guides include directions to the trailhead, mileage, range in elevation, difficulty, and trail highlights. They’re also avaiable at the USFS visitor center in Silverthorne. Continue reading

Golden horseshoe trail and restoration planning starts

Input wanted on overall plan for Summit County recreation area; Swan River restoration a big part of the effort

The Forest Service wants to add some new trails and decommission others in the popular Golden Horseshoe area near Breckenridge.

By Summit Voice

SUMMIT COUNTY — The Forest Service is seeking public comment on an ambitious plan to remodel the Golden Horseshoe with sustainable trails and a particular focus on ecosystem restoration of the Swan River watershed, between Breckenridge and Frisco.

The environmental study now under way will evaluate and disclose potential effects  proposed reconstruction and designation of several trails, in addition to closure and rehabilitation of several roads in the area.

Generally, the projects consist of the following:

  • 3.7 miles of non-motorized trail construction
  • 5.0 miles of motorized trail construction
  • 5.1 miles of road decommissioning

Maps, documents and commenting information is online at this WRNF web page. Continue reading

Summit County: Time to name some trails

Trail Number 43, along the east side of the Blue River inlet, needs a new name.

White River NF Travel plan implementation set for this spring

SUMMIT COUNTY — As the White River National Forest starts implementing the new travel management plan, numerous user-created social trails will formally be added to the forest trail system — and some of them need names.

Some trails already have informal names, given by neighborhood users over the years, and those will generally be adopted by the Forest Service, but about 100 trails are as-yet un-named, and the Dillon Ranger District is accepting suggestions through April 1.

In a press release, the district offered a few suggestions for names, saying that natural features, as well as geographic or historic landmarks, are suitable fodder for names, while naming a trail after oneself or for a friend is probably not appropriate. Crooked Creek, Twisted Pine or Bloated Goat could all work (hypothetical examples), while Joe’s Trail, or the Wilson’s Shoe Store Trail are not acceptable. Obscene or controversial names would not be considered.

The public is invited to submit name recommendations to the Dillon Ranger District on or before April 1, 2012. Get more information on travel plan implementation at this WRNF web page. Continue reading

Summit County: Motorized trails proposed for Tenderfoot

Forest Service to hold Oct. 19 open house on plan

A preliminary map show proposed locations for trails in the Tenderfoot Mountain and Frey Gulch area. Click for a downloadable PDF version.

By Summit Voice

SUMMIT COUNTY — The White River National Forest wants to build 15 miles of new multi-use trails in the Tenderfoot and Frey Gulch area to accommodate motorized use. The project is being developed in response to a proposal by the Summit County Off-Road Riders. The proposal includes the rehabilitation of 15 miles of existing trails in the same area. Some illegal user-created trails in the same area would be closed and rehabilitated.

According to the Forest Service, the goal is to change an unmanaged, expanding system of mostly steep, eroded, user-created trails to a managed, finite system of sustainable, well-designed trails, and to provide a single-track trail system that is managed specifically for motorcycle use.

The Forest Service says there is a need to provide more motorized recreational opportunities on the White River National Forest, especially after adoption of the forest travel plan, which includes new restrictions on motorized use. Continue reading

Colorado: Big logging project begins on Frisco Peninsula

A GoogleEarth view of the Frisco Peninsula shows the huge expanse of red, dead lodgepole pines.

Crown Point Road to be closed, campgrounds, trails remain open

By Summit Voice

SUMMIT COUNTY — Major logging operations are set to begin on the Frisco Peninsula July 11 as the U.S. Forest Service clears out beetle-killed trees.

Campgrounds on the peninsula will stay open, but Crown Point Road (FSR #1008.1) will be closed to vehicle traffic. Hiking and mountain biking trails will not be closed but the public should expect to see heavy machinery felling and skidding trees across some trails.

Visitors to the area are asked to use caution while on the peninsula and to consider an alternative location for hiking or mountain biking. Most of the felling will be on the west side of the Peninsula. Signs will be posted for hikers and bikers to inform people of the tree-felling operations. Continue reading

Summit County: Blue River campground re-opening

Logging is done, restoration under way at riverside camping area

The Blue River campground was clearcut to remove beetle-killed trees, but it re-opens this summer after a two-year closure.

Open for business as of Memorial Day!

SUMMIT COUNTY — After a two-year closure, the Blue River campground, north of Silverthorne, will open for the summer on Memorial Day weekend.

“This campground has been closed to the public the last two years to allow for the removal of the bark beetle-killed trees,” said Ken Waugh, recreation staff officers for the Dillon Ranger District.

All the mature lodgepole trees were killed by the insects and removed, but a few aspen, cottonwood, and spruce trees still present to provide some screening and shade. In mid-May, 3,000 tiny seedling were planted around the campground by volunteers in a project coordinated by the Friends of the Dillon Ranger District and Volunteers for Outdoor Colorado.   Continue reading

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