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Climate: USGS study tracks Chesapeake Bay warming

Chesapeake Bay in a Landsat photo.

Chesapeake Bay in a Landsat photo.

Water temps up 2.5 degrees Fahrenheit in 50 years

Staff Report

FRISCO— The huge Chesapeake Bay watershed — the country’s largest estuary — is warming steadily, USGS scientists say, warning that increase in temperatures is likely to have big consequences for the region’s ecosystems. Continue reading

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Global warming: Many U.S. coastal areas to see frequent flooding sooner rather than later

High water at the mouth of the Mississippi River, near Venice, Louisiana.

High water at the mouth of the Mississippi River, near Venice, Louisiana. bberwyn photo.

Study eyes flood ‘tipping’ points

Staff Report

FRISCO — Rising sea levels will subject many coastal areas in the U.S. to frequent flooding by the middle of the century, according to a new NOAA study aimed at identifying flood “tipping points.” By 2050, a majority of U.S. coastal areas are likely to be threatened by 30 or more days of flooding each year the study concluded.

The research was led by NOAA scientists William Sweet and Joseph Park and published this week in the American Geophysical Union’s online peer-reviewed journal Earth’s Future. Continue reading

Global Warming: Is the Greenland Ice Sheet melting faster than we think?

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How fast will the Greenland ice sheet melt?

243 gigatons of ice per year …

Staff Report

FRISCO — The most detailed look yet at the dynamics of the Greenland ice sheet suggests that current climate models may not be capturing the full extent of melting.

A team of scientists tracking the behavior of the ice sheet said they found unexpected shrinking in southeastern Greenland, and other signs suggesting that current models may underestimate ice loss in the near future. Continue reading

Climate: Will 2014 end up as the warmest year ever for planet Earth?

Hot all over …

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A few cool spots, but plenty of global warmth in November.

Staff Report

FRISCO — Average November global temperatures eased slightly from the record pace of the previous two months, but still ended up as the seventh-warmest on record, according to NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center. Continue reading

Research eyes global warming-extreme weather links

Attribution studies still somewhat sketchy

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Does global warming cause extreme weather?

Staff Report

FRISCO — A Stanford University climate researcher says that better modeling, advanced statistical analyses and a more robust set of observational climate data will help scientists under stand whether global warming is leading to more extreme weather events like floods, droughts and heat waves.

Such events appear to happening more frequently around the world, but  because high-quality weather records go back only about 100 years, most scientists have been reluctant to say if global warming affected particular extreme events. Continue reading

Can some Caribbean corals survive global warming?

Coral and other marine resources in the Florida Keys are at risk from an approaching oil plume.

Some corals are less sensitive to ocean acidification than others, according to a new study. Photo via NOAA.

Study say soft Gorgonian coral species can still calcify under elevated CO2 levels

Staff Report

FRISCO — Not all corals are equal when it comes to withstanding the ravages of global warming.

Some Caribbean soft corals, known as gorgonians, may be able to calcify and grow under elevated carbon dioxide concentrations. Those corals may be more resilient to the ocean acidification levels projected by the end of the 21st century than previously thought, according to a new study published in the journal Coral Reef. Continue reading

More methane woes – study tracks abandoned well emissions

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Concentrations of heat-trapping methane are increasing steadily in the Earth’s atmosphere.

‘What surprised me was that every well we measured had some methane coming out …’

FRISCO — Fixing leaky pipes and other equipment at operational oil and gas wells would go a long way toward cutting emissions of heat-trapping methane pollution, but wells that were abandoned decades ago could be another big source of the potent greenhouse gas.

Princeton University researchers recently tested several abandoned oil and natural gas wells in northwestern Pennsylvania, finding that many of the old wells leaked substantial quantities of methane. By some estimates, there are as many as 3 million abandoned wells across the U.S. Continue reading

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