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Study: Toxic stream pollution from road salt doubles

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Pollution from road salt is increasing quickly, a new USGS study found.

EPA standards for chloride exceeded at one in three sampling sites

Staff Report

FRISCO — Many streams in the northern U.S. are polluted to toxic levels by salt deicers, the U.S. Geological Survey said in a new study that found the frequency of these occurrences nearly doubling in two decades.

Chloride levels increased substantially in 84 percent of the urban streams analyzed, the researchers said, using data going back to 1960 and ending as recently as 2011. Continue reading

Is melting Arctic sea ice shifting the jet stream?

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Is melting sea ice shifting the jet stream?

Study finds robust link between Arctic ice decline and severe Eurasian winter weather

Staff Report

FRISCO — If you feel like you’ve been on a weather roller coaster, maybe it’s because the jet stream has been behaving like one more and more often in recent years.

Instead of flowing around the mid-latitudes of the northern hemisphere with a few ripples, some years, the high-altitude river of air has been more like a writhing, out-of-control fire hose, snaking and looping, carrying huge surges of warm air north and cold. polar air south. At times, the jet stream has been getting stuck in that pattern for longer stretches. Continue reading

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Environment: Tuesday roundup

Independent journalism in western Colorado

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Big issues at the climate talks in Lima, Peru.

By Bob Berwyn

FRISCO — If you primarily read this Summit Voice feed, which has been climate focused recently, you may have missed a few other recent stories I’ve done for the Colorado Independent. The past couple of weeks I’ve  covered issues in western Colorado, including fossil fuel development, public lands protection and even the ski industry from time to time, including this week’s story about a Colorado Supreme Court case. Continue reading

Global Warming: Is the Greenland Ice Sheet melting faster than we think?

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How fast will the Greenland ice sheet melt?

243 gigatons of ice per year …

Staff Report

FRISCO — The most detailed look yet at the dynamics of the Greenland ice sheet suggests that current climate models may not be capturing the full extent of melting.

A team of scientists tracking the behavior of the ice sheet said they found unexpected shrinking in southeastern Greenland, and other signs suggesting that current models may underestimate ice loss in the near future. Continue reading

Climate: Will 2014 end up as the warmest year ever for planet Earth?

Hot all over …

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A few cool spots, but plenty of global warmth in November.

Staff Report

FRISCO — Average November global temperatures eased slightly from the record pace of the previous two months, but still ended up as the seventh-warmest on record, according to NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center. Continue reading

Study: Global warming likely to help invasive species gain the upper hand in wetlands

Colorado wetlands

 Meadow Creek wetlands, Frisco, Colorado.

‘Death by a thousand cuts’

Staff Report

FRISCO — Invasive wetlands species are likely to get a boost from climate change, resulting in long-term threats to key native ecosystems, according to new research from Duke University.

“Changing surface-water temperatures, rainfall patterns and river flows will likely give Japanese knotweed, hydrilla, honeysuckle, privet and other noxious invasive species an edge over less adaptable native species,” said Neal E. Flanagan, visiting assistant professor at the Duke Wetland Center, who led the research. Continue reading

Humble fungi may aid whitebark pine recovery

PHOTO COURTESY USFS/RICHARD SNIEZKO

Can mushrooms help save whitebark pines? Photo courtesy U.S. Forest Service.

Scientists report success in treating seedlings with mushroom spores

Staff Report

FRISCO — High-elevation whitebark pines are under the gun in the northern Rockies. White pine blister rust, an invasive fungus, and pine beetles have combined to drive the species toward extinction.

But scientists trying to recover the species say that a humble mushroom could help their efforts. A three-year experiment shows a 10 to 15 percent increase in the survival rate of whitebark pine seedlings when Siberian slippery jack spores are injected into the soil around them. The injection takes place in nurseries before the seedlings are transplanted in the mountains. Continue reading

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