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Morning photo: Purple mountains, really!

A quick Summit set …

Lookin' like Kodachrome!

Lookin’ like Kodachrome!

.FRISCO — I really do dig the way iPhone sensors pick up colors in the sky, and especially in the clouds — just check out the last picture in this set! So in the course of wandering around Summit County the last couple of days, I did manage to stop and point my camera at various things, usually involving wildflowers, the sky, clouds and/or some distant peaks. I’ve recently started shooting a lot more images in vertical format, because they’re easier to crop for Instagram that way. It kind of reminds of the old square-film format, so sometimes I pretend I’m shooting with a Hasselblad.

If you enjoy our near-daily feed of high country images, please visit our online gallery at Fine Art America.

And if you want to keep those photos coming, along with our stellar environmental reporting, visit our Rocky Mountain Climate Ranger crowdfunding page at Beacon. We’re at 70 percent of our goal and really could use your help to help sustain world-class environmental reporting.

Donate to the Rocky Mountain Climate Ranger project

mtnYour contribution to this independent journalism project will be matched dollar for dollar by Beacon. Click to learn more and make a donation. Continue reading

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Crowdfunding: Nearly 70 percent there!

The Rocky Mountain Climate Ranger Project needs your support

It's getting warm around here!

It’s getting warm around here!

Love the Rockies? Support our independent journalism project.

Love the Rockies? Support our independent journalism project.

By Summit Voice

FRISCO — With NOAA reporting yet another record high global temperature for June, and afternoon temperatures soaring into the 80s here in Frisco, there’s every reason to believe that we’re heading for uncharted climate territory in the Rocky Mountains. Already, the birds and bees are out of synch with wildflowers, the snowpack is melting weeks earlier than it used to, and spring dust storms are blackening the Rocky Mountain snowpack more frequently each year.

It’s really important to know what those changes mean for us, and especially for future generations — our kids and grandkids — because they will have to live in the greenhouse-gas warmed world that we’ve created with just a few decades of fossil fuel consumption. That’s why once again I’m asking you, faithful Summit Voice readers and subscribers, to support our Rocky Mountain Climate Ranger project my making a pledge right now at Beacon, our crowdfunding partner: http://www.beaconreader.com/projects/rocky-mountain-climate-rangers.

And just to be clear, the Beacon-backed Climate Ranger project won’t have any negative effect on Summit Voice. In fact, your support will help enrich the Summit Voice news and photo feed.

Some of you already responded to our grassroots appeal in the last few months. It was your generous response that encouraged us to pursue funding for this two-month father-son climate journalism trek. And right now, Beacon is generously matching every pledge dollar for dollar, so when you support us, your money will be doubled. We’re only about a week away from the end of our pledge drive (July 31) and we’ll only be funded if we get the full amount, so your support is critical.

You can support the project for as little as $5 but we have some great incentives for larger pledges, including a free harvest dinner at the popular Sunshine Cafe in Dillon. A $100 pledge includes dinner for two, along with a climate journalism presentation at the Sunshine Cafe. It’s a great deal, and you’d pay almost that much just to have a nice dinner for two, so why not support homegrown environmental journalism at the same time.

For $200, you’ll be invited to the dinner AND you’ll be eligible for a large-format fine art print from one of Summit Voice’s acclaimed online galleries, or an image from the reporting trek — and I’m sure we’ll get some great shots!

With our deadline approaching, please consider making a pledge now, and if you can’t, please pass along this post via email to anyone who might be interested. Thanks for reading and your continued support.

Donate to the Rocky Mountain Climate Ranger project

mtnYour contribution to this independent journalism project will be matched dollar for dollar by Beacon. Click to learn more and make a donation.

Climate: Has global warming slowed down?

Study shows natural variability still a factor in climate change

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Staff Report

FRISCO — A cool phase of natural climate variability may have canceled out the heat-trapping effects of greenhouse gases the past 15 years, which would explain the so-called global warming slowdown, according to McGill University physicist Shaun Lovejoy.

In a paper published recently in Geophysical Research Letters, Lovejoy concluded after a statistical analysis of average global temperatures between 1998 and 2013 thatslowdown in global warming during this period is consistent with natural variations in temperature.

In a paper published this month in Geophysical Research Letters, Lovejoy concludes that a natural cooling fluctuation during this period largely masked the warming effects of a continued increase in man-made emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases. Continue reading

Climate: Hottest June on record for Planet Earth

Warm oceans drive widespread record warmth

A NASA climate maps shows much of the globe was warmer than average during June 2014.

A NASA climate maps shows much of the globe was warmer than average during June 2014.

By Summit Voice

FRISCO — For the second month in a row, NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center reported that Earth’s average temperature reached a record high, at 1.3 degrees Fahrenheit above the 20th century average, and 0.05 degrees Fahrenheit above the previous record, set in 2010.

Nine of the ten warmest Junes on record have all occurred during the 21st century, including each of the past five years. The new record high was driven in part by persistent ocean heat. The June global sea surface temperature was 1.15 degrees Fahrenheit above the 20th century average. surpassing the previous all-time record for any month by 0.09 degrees Fahrenheit. Read the full report here. Continue reading

Biodiversity: Condor chick hatches in Zion National Park

A tagged California condor in flight.

A tagged California condor in flight. Photo via Wikipedia and the Creative Commons.

Can the endangered birds recover from the brink of extinction?

Staff Report

FRISCO — California condors have been hovering on the brink of extinction for decades. But the majestic birds may be on the verge of making a comeback in southern Utah, National Park Service biologists said last week, announcing the first-ever birth of a condor chick in Zion National Park.

Without revealing the exact location to the public, biologists had been monitoring a rock cavity in a remote corner of the park for several weeks where they observed the nesting pair. Finally, on June 25, the condor chick made its first appearance at the edge of the nest. Continue reading

Opinion: Lake Hill development should be carbon-neutral

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Bob Berwyn.

Smart up-front planning can minimize our carbon footprint

By Bob Berwyn

FRISCO — Passage of the Lake Hill land conveyance bill by the U.S. Senate last week is good news for Summit County’s efforts to try and keep up with the demand for affordable housing in the pricey mountain resort region, and will also help the U.S. Forest Service by funding a new administrative and maintenance facility. Now that the deal is done, it’s time to start thinking about making sure that the Lake Hill neighborhood becomes a model of sustainable development. Continue reading

Morning photo: Four Corners magic

From the archives …

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Somewhere in the desert …

FRISCO — If you’ve never wandered down across that strange and wonderful spot where Colorado, Arizona, Utah and New Mexico all come together, it’s time to get on the road and check it out. Of course the Four Corners monument itself has bcome quite the tourist attraction, but the surrounding countryside is classic American desert, with vast swaths of sagebrush leading up to piñon and juniper dotted mesas. You won’t get any guarantees that the light will be good, but last time Leigh and I passed through the area (It’s been a while), it was pure magic. Continue reading

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