About these ads

Forest Service close to releasing environmental study for proposed new backcountry ski hut near Breckenridge

Public review session set for Aug. 22 at Breckenridge ice rink

Weber Gulch Hut

The Weber Gulch Hut is proposed for the north flank of Baldy Mountain, near Breckenridge, Colorado. Map courtesy U.S. Forest Service.

By Bob Berwyn

FRISCO — The long range vision for encircling Summit County with a network of backcountry ski huts may come into a little more focus this month.

The White River National Forest is preparing to release a draft environmental study for the proposed Weber Gulch hut during the next few weeks, with a public review of the document set for Aug. 22 (5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m) at the Breckenridge ice rink. Continue reading

About these ads

Colorado: Arapahoe Basin extends the season

dsfg

Summer fun at Arapahoe Basin Ski Area. Bob Berwyn photo.

Bonus weekend set for June 7-9

By Summit Voice

SUMMIT COUNTY — Colorado skiers will get a bonus weekend at Arapahoe Basin, as the ski area extends the season for an extra weekend. Cool spring temperatures and big snows in April and May helped preserve a good base at the high-elevation ski area.

“With all the spring storms, our exceptional snow conditions, and our guests’ enthusiasm for skiing and riding, it only makes sense to open for another weekend,” said Alan Henceroth, Arapahoe Basin’s chief operating officer.

The last couple of winters have been a roller coaster for A-Basin and Colorado in general. The winter of 2010-2011 delivered near-record snow in many locations and A-Basin stayed open though the Fourth of July holiday. Continue reading

Skiing at the Oasis

Backcountry paradise in the Canadian Rockies

Our camp at around noon on the day we flew in.

Our camp at around noon on the day we flew in to the Oasis Lake area in the Selkirks.

By Stan Wagon (All photos by Stan Wagon unless otherwise noted.)

After 23 years of skiing in British Columbia, either visiting a nice lodge (with many comforts) or doing a ski traverse (camping, and traveling with heavy packs), we tried something new this year — a week-long base camp at a single location. We chose Oasis Lake in the Selkirks southwest of Golden, a spot we had passed through on a traverse on 2004. To our group of six Coloradans we added a guide, Pierre Hungr, who last year led us on a hut-to-hut trip near the Lyell Icefield.

We used a Bell 212 helicopter flown by Alpine Helicopters in Golden. It is a powerful and spacious machine, but it cannot fly in low visibility, and we were delayed a day going in (and the same going out). Speaking of delays, the drive up was a bit of an adventure as I-25 was closed at the Wyoming border and we had to make a complicated detour via Highway 14 through Cameron Pass in whiteout conditions, and then use a route through Idaho. This added eight hours to what is already a long 1.5-day drive.

The view from near camp of the Wrong icefall and the descent route at looker's right. This picture proves that there was more snow here this year than in April 2004, where more rocks were showing.

A view of the Wrong icefall from near the camp, with the descent route at looker’s right. This picture proves that there was more snow here this year than in April 2004, where more rocks were showing.

Continue reading

Colorado: Ski season in high gear at A-Basin

Spring powder nothing new for The Legend

asfd

Skiing April powder at Arapahoe Basin, April 2010. Bob Berwyn photo.

asdf

A skier enjoys a big powder day at Arapahoe Basin on April 23, 2010. Bob Berwyn photo.

By Bob Berwyn

FRISCO — While most of Colorado’s megaresorts closed with more snow than they’ve had on their slopes all season, a handful of areas are still open for spring skiing, including Aspen Highlands, Winter Park, Loveland and, of course, Arapahoe Basin, known for having one of the longest seasons in the country.

With 21 inches of new snow in just the 48 hours and more on the way for the next few days, ski conditions at Arapahoe Basin are peaking. A 65-inch base means great conditions all over the mountain, including Montezuma Bowl and the steeps of the East Wall. As general manager Alan Henceroth wrote in a recent blog post, “All the the little lines are filled.” Continue reading

Forest Service holds public meetings on ski area water rights

After legal showdown, agency, resorts start down collaborative path to address critical water questions

asdfg

Who owns the water originating on national forest lands? Bob Berwyn photo.

By Bob Berwyn

SUMMIT COUNTY — After losing a court showdown, the U.S. Forest Service will restart a process to try and clarify the future of water rights associated with permitted uses on national forest lands, especially with regard to ski areas in the West. Click here to see related Summit Voice stories.

In December, a federal court ruled that the Forest Service failed to meet legal requirements when it updated the rule administratively. Now, the agency will hold a series of public meetings, starting April 16 in Denver, to take input from the public and key stakeholders. Additional meetings are set for Salt Lake City on April 17, and Lake Tahoe, Calif., on April 18. Continue reading

Colorado skier visits stabilize during the heart of the season

Good late-season snow conditions should help Colorado ski areas bounce back partially from a so-so start to the season.

Good late-season snow conditions should help Colorado ski areas bounce back partially from a so-so start to the season.

Ski trade group reports slight increase from last season for the January-February period

By Summit Voice

SUMMIT COUNTY — After dropping steeply last season and the first part of this winter, Colorado skier visits stabilized during the past few months, according to Colorado Ski Country USA.

The state’s ski industry trade group said skier visits at its 21 member resorts climbed 1.3 percent during January and February, compared to the same two months last season.

For the season to-date, visitation at CSCUSA resorts was down 4.2 percent compared to the same time last season, defined as opening day through February 28. Continue reading

Vail Ski Area revamps management of Prima Cornice terrain after last winter’s deadly inbounds avalanche

Resort says it will use more ropes and signage when needed to discourage uphill traffic and warn of potential hazards

asdf

A diagram prepared by the Colorado Avalanche Information Center shows the approximate locations of various gates used to access Prima Cornice at Vail Ski Area.

*Read more Summit Voice coverage of the inbounds avalanche deaths at Vail and Winter Park here.

By Bob Berwyn

SUMMIT COUNTY — With the discovery phase of a trial over last year’s inbounds avalanche death of a teenage skier under way, Vail Resorts this week announced that it has changed the way ski patrollers manage the Vail Ski Area terrain where the deadly incident occurred.

Based on its own review of the avalanche on Prima Cornice, Vail officials said there may be times when patrollers use more ropes and signage to indicate closures and potential danger. The changes were instituted at the start of this season, according to a statement from Vail Resorts.

“Vail Resorts takes safety as its highest priority, and we continually re-evaluate and adapt based on new information or changing skier behavior. The Company remains a defendant in a lawsuit concerning this incident and will not be making additional comments. We remain incredibly saddened by the events of that day, and our deepest sympathy continues to go out to the family of Taft Conlin,” the company said in it statement. Continue reading

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 7,658 other followers