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Wildlife: Feds say genetic testing confirms that wolf near Grand Canyon is from the Northern Rockies

Trapping efforts suspended for now

Grand Canyon wolf

A gray wolf that wandered at least 450 miles from the northern Rockies is now living near the Grand Canyon in Arizona. Photo courtesy Arizona Game and Fish Department.

By Bob Berwyn

FRISCO — Federal biologists say that, based on a genetic analysis of scat, they’re now 100 percent sure that the wolf-like animal spotted near the North Rim of the Grand Canyon is in fact a wild Rocky Mountain gray wolf.

The confirmation clarifies that this gray wolf is fully protected under the Endangered Species Act, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced. Biologists have been tracking the canid since early October and were able to collect scat samples in early November. Continue reading

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Colorado: Investigators seek info on elk poaching near Dinosaur

Three mature bull elk shot and left near highway

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Bull elk testing each other in Rocky Mountain National Park. bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

FRISCO — Wildlife officials are investigating a particularly egregious case of poaching near the town of Dinosaur.

According to CPW investigators, the intact carcasses of two elk were discovered the morning of Nov. 6, approximately 100 yards north of Highway 40 near milepost 17. They were found lying 150 yards apart and each bull appears to have been killed before sunrise by a single shot from a high-powered rifle.

The carcass of a third bull elk was found the morning of Nov. 12 on the south side of Highway 40 near milepost 6, near the Dinosaur National Monument Visitor’s Center. The bull is thought to have been killed sometime between the evening of Nov. 11 and the morning of Nov. 12. The animal had a single bullet wound and only the antlers had been removed from the carcass. It is unknown if the incidents are related. Continue reading

Why do bats fly into wind turbines?

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Close observation of bat behavior around wind turbines may help reduce bat deaths.

Study results may aid bat conservation

Staff Report

FRISCO — Scientists say they may be a step closer to being able to reduce widespread bat mortality associated with the development of wind energy.

Based on months of nighttime video surveillance, U.S. Geological Society researchers say some species of the flying mammals may be mistaking the wind turbines for trees. The tree-roosting bats may be confusing the turbines for trees, according to USGS scientist Paul Cryan.

“If we can understand why bats approach wind turbines, we may be able to turn them away,” Cryan said. “Advances in technology helped us overcome the difficulties of watching small bats flying in the dark around the 40-story heights of wind turbines. The new behaviors we saw are useful clues in the quest to know how bats perceive wind turbines and why they approach them.”  Continue reading

Can good planning ease global warming impacts to wildlife?

An adult lynx in Colorado warily surveys its surroundings. The wild cats were recently named to a top-10 list of species most at risk from climate change impacts to habitat. PHOTO BY TANYA SHENK, Colorado Division of Wildlife.

An adult lynx in Colorado warily surveys its surroundings. The wild cats were recently named to a top-10 list of species most at risk from climate change impacts to habitat. Photo by Tanya Shenk, Colorado Division of Wildlife.

New report highlights actions aimed at buffering ecosystems from climate change

Staff Report

FRISCO — Congress may still be dithering over global warming, but some federal agencies are on a fast-forward path to addressing climate-change impacts to natural resources.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service last month unveiled a new report describing 50 projects launched to strengthen climate resiliency, including wildlife movement areas that help buffer animals from global warming and reforestation projects focusing on climate-resilient native trees.

“Across the nation, a broad coalition of natural resource agencies is working with partners and stakeholders to collectively address the current impacts and future threats of climate change,” said USFWS deputy director Rowan Gould. “The concrete actions documented in this report represent real progress, but helping native species  cope with the effects of climate disruption requires us to build on these successes,” Gould said. Continue reading

Environment: Shifting a small amount of global military spending to conservation would go a long way

Elk Rocky Mountain National Park

Well-protected elk browse in Rocky Mountain National Park.

New paper outlines need for renewed conservation emphasis

Staff Report

FRISCO — Shifting just a small fraction of the world’s military spending to conservation could help ensure protection and sustainable management for important wildlife habitat, experts say in a new report released ahead of the upcoming IUCN World Parks Congress in Sydney.

The paper, published in Nature, was compiled by experts with Wildlife Conservation Society, the University of Queensland, and the IUCN World Commission on Protected Areas. The authors concluded that allocating US $45 – $76 billion —  just 2.5 percent of  global annual military spending — would go a long way toward meeting the need for better management of protected areas. Continue reading

Study finds big decline in common European birds

Sapphire Point is also a great spot to get up close and personal with some local wildlife.

A common jay in Colorado. bberwyn photo.

‘It is clear that the way we are managing the environment is unsustainable for many of our most familiar species’

Staff Report

Bird populations across Europe have experienced sharp declines over the past 30 years, with the majority of losses from the most common species, according to a new study from the University of Exeter (UK).

The study documented a decrease of 421 million individual birds over 30 years. About 90 percent of these losses were from the 36 most common and widespread species, including house sparrows, skylarks, grey partridges and starlings. Continue reading

Endangered species listing proposed for African lions

The USFWS says African lions are in danger of extinction. Photo via Wikipedia and the Creative Commons.

It is up to all of us’

Staff Report

FRISCO — Habitat loss, loss of prey base, and increased human-lion conflict are threatening African lions to the point that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed listing the species under the Endangered Species Act.

“It is up to all of us, not just the people of Africa, to ensure that healthy, wild populations continue to roam the savannah for generations to come,” said USFWS director Dan Ashe, explaining that his agency found that lions are in danger of extinction in the foreseeable future. In a news release, Ashe described lions as a symbol of  majesty, courage and strength. Continue reading

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