Feds taking input on new Florida manatee plan

ipj

Manatees at Crystal Springs, Florida. bberwyn photo.

Refuge managers seek to balance protection of marine mammals with demand for public access at Three Sisters Springs

Staff Report

FRISCO — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says a careful management plan at a freshwater spring in Florida can help protect manatees and ensure public access to the popular Three Sisters Springs recreation area.

The agency this week started taking input on a draft environmental assessment for management actions to protect manatees and still allow public access at Three Sisters Springs during the winter season. Continue reading

Colorado: Wildlife biologists still grappling with Kokanee salmon decline in Lake Granby

Kokanee salmon caught at Green Mountain Reservoir, Summit County, Colorado. bberwyn photo.

Kokanee salmon caught at Green Mountain Reservoir, Summit County, Colorado. bberwyn photo.

New tool helps fisheries managers gather more eggs from other reservoirs

Staff Report

FRISCO — Colorado Parks and Wildlife biologists say they’ve wrapped up their annual kokanee salmon egg collection activities for the year, with good results at Wolford Mountain Reservoir, where they were able to gather 1.78 million eggs.

But predatory lake trout and other factors combined to suppress egg production in Lake Granby, historically the biggest source of eggs for the desirable sport fish. Continue reading

Wildlife: Feds cancel permit for wolf-hunting contest

Pending court challenge may have been factor in BLM decision

nj;

A Yellowstone wolf pack confronts a bull elk. Photo courtesy National Park Service.

Staff Report

FRISCO —Anti-wildlife Idaho residents won’t get a chance to slaughter predators in a government-sanctioned event this year, as the Bureau of Land Management has decided to cancel a permit for a so-called predator derby that was scheduled to be held on public lands near Salmon in January.

The event would have offered prizes in a contest to kill the most wolves, coyotes, and other species over three days every year for five years, beginning Jan. 2, 2015. Continue reading

Colorado: When hunting guides go bad

A mountain lion in Colorado

Several people associated with a hunting guide service in western Colorado will have to pay big fines and face other penalties after wounding and maiming mountain lions. Photo courtesy Colorado Parks and Wildlife.

‘Many of the violations committed by Mr. Loncarich appear to be the result of greed, unlawfully killing and maiming wildlife to increase his profits’

Staff Report

FRISCO — A Colorado man and his Oregon helper — who claimed to be hunting guides — are facing stiff penalties after pleading guilty to violate the Lacey Act, a federal law prohibiting the interstate transportation and sale of any wildlife taken in an illegal manner. Continue reading

Wildlife: Feds say genetic testing confirms that wolf near Grand Canyon is from the Northern Rockies

Trapping efforts suspended for now

Grand Canyon wolf

A gray wolf that wandered at least 450 miles from the northern Rockies is now living near the Grand Canyon in Arizona. Photo courtesy Arizona Game and Fish Department.

By Bob Berwyn

FRISCO — Federal biologists say that, based on a genetic analysis of scat, they’re now 100 percent sure that the wolf-like animal spotted near the North Rim of the Grand Canyon is in fact a wild Rocky Mountain gray wolf.

The confirmation clarifies that this gray wolf is fully protected under the Endangered Species Act, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced. Biologists have been tracking the canid since early October and were able to collect scat samples in early November. Continue reading

Colorado: Investigators seek info on elk poaching near Dinosaur

Three mature bull elk shot and left near highway

ug

Bull elk testing each other in Rocky Mountain National Park. bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

FRISCO — Wildlife officials are investigating a particularly egregious case of poaching near the town of Dinosaur.

According to CPW investigators, the intact carcasses of two elk were discovered the morning of Nov. 6, approximately 100 yards north of Highway 40 near milepost 17. They were found lying 150 yards apart and each bull appears to have been killed before sunrise by a single shot from a high-powered rifle.

The carcass of a third bull elk was found the morning of Nov. 12 on the south side of Highway 40 near milepost 6, near the Dinosaur National Monument Visitor’s Center. The bull is thought to have been killed sometime between the evening of Nov. 11 and the morning of Nov. 12. The animal had a single bullet wound and only the antlers had been removed from the carcass. It is unknown if the incidents are related. Continue reading

Why do bats fly into wind turbines?

dfgh

Close observation of bat behavior around wind turbines may help reduce bat deaths.

Study results may aid bat conservation

Staff Report

FRISCO — Scientists say they may be a step closer to being able to reduce widespread bat mortality associated with the development of wind energy.

Based on months of nighttime video surveillance, U.S. Geological Society researchers say some species of the flying mammals may be mistaking the wind turbines for trees. The tree-roosting bats may be confusing the turbines for trees, according to USGS scientist Paul Cryan.

“If we can understand why bats approach wind turbines, we may be able to turn them away,” Cryan said. “Advances in technology helped us overcome the difficulties of watching small bats flying in the dark around the 40-story heights of wind turbines. The new behaviors we saw are useful clues in the quest to know how bats perceive wind turbines and why they approach them.”  Continue reading

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 7,851 other followers