Environment: do you want to sail the Ocean Blue with Jack Johnson and learn about plastic pollution?

Video contest will award winner with a spot on a six-day Atlantic research voyage

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Oceans or garbage dumps?

The winner of the 5 Gyres video contest will join the crew of the Mystic on a scientific sailing expedition. Photo courtesy % Gyres.

The winner of the 5 Gyres video contest will join the crew of the Mystic on a scientific sailing expedition. Photo courtesy 5 Gyres.

Staff Report

FRISCO — A short video about local solutions to ocean plastic pollution could put you aboard a six-day scientific sailing expedition aimed at learning more about the North Atlantic Gyre, where huge amounts of waste spin in a giant lazy ocean eddy — to the detriment of the ocean environment.

The contest is sponsored by the 5 Gyres Institute, named for the five major ocean circulations that trap garbage and debris. In some areas, rafts of floating garbage have enabled invasive bacteria to get a foothold in the ocean environment. Scientists have known about the problem for a long time, and they also know it’s getting worse. Continue reading

Study shows how ocean noise harms dolphins

Seismic airgun blasting, naval warfare training are key sources of harmful ocean noise pollution

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A dolphin the Gulf of Mexico. @bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

FRISCO — With ever more offshore oil and gas exploration proposed, conservation advocates have been warning that the cumulative effects of those activities will take a huge toll on dolphins, whales and other marine life.

Of particular concern are plans to ramp up seismic underwater airgun blasting, used in the search for oil and gas deposits beneath the seafloor. Federal officials recently adopted a final proposal that would allow the use of this controversial technology in an area twice the size of California, stretching from Delaware to Florida.  Continue reading

Climate: Oceans die quickly, take millennia to recover

‘We humans have to think carefully about the planet we are leaving for future generations’

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Using driftwood logs as paddles, local fishermen head out to set nets along the northern coast of Jamaica. @bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

FRISCO — It may take oceans thousands of years to recover from global warming impacts, California-based scientists said after study a seafloor sediment core sample that tracked the impacts of ancient climate upheavals.

The study, led by scientists with the UC Davis Bodega Marine Laboratory and Coastal and Marine Sciences Institute, looked at more than  5,400 invertebrate fossils, from sea urchins to clams, in a 30-foot sediment core from offshore Santa Barbara, California.

The core sample documents changes in the ocean ecosystem between  3,400 and 16,100 years ago, during the last major deglaciation, which was a time of abrupt climate warming, melting polar ice caps, and expansion of low oxygen zones in the ocean. Continue reading

Report shows growing impacts of ocean acidification

CU-Boulder scientists study document decline of calcification rates in marine organisms around Antarctica

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The Southern Ocean may lose its ability to function as a carbon sink. bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

*More Summit Voice stories on ocean acidification

FRISCO — The steady increase of atmospheric carbon dioxide is already causing large-scale shifts in the ocean carbon cycle, according to University of Colorado, Boulder scientists, who calculated the calcification rate of marine organisms in the Southern Ocean.

According to the scientists there has been a 24 percent decline in the amount of calcium carbonate produced in large areas of the Southern Ocean over the past 17 years. Continue reading

Environment: Deep-sea fish not immune to pollution

New study finds liver damage and tumors in fish living a mile deep off the coast of France

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Even fish living deep in remote oceans are tainted by pollution.

Staff Report

FRISCO — As big and as deep as Earth’s oceans are, they’re still feeling the sting of human-caused pollution. Even a mile down, some fish have liver pathologies, tumors and other types of health problems that are often linked with exposure to toxic chemicals and carcinogens, according to a new study conducted in the Bay of Biscay, off the coast of France.

The study also discovered the first case of a deep water fish species with an “intersex” condition, a blend of male and female sex organs. The sampling was done in an area with no apparent point-source pollution, and appears to reflect general ocean conditions.

“Deep in the ocean one might have thought that the level of contamination and its biological impact would be less,” said Michael Kent, an Oregon State University microbiologist who co-authored the new study. “That may not be the case. The pathological changes we’re seeing are clearly the type associated with exposure to toxins and carcinogens,” said Kent, one of the study’s co-authors. Continue reading

Environment: Green sea turtles making a comeback

Federal biologists proposal to revamp endangered species listing recognizes conservation progress and allows for more site-specific management

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A green sea turtle swims near the seafloor of the Pacific. Photo courtesy Andy Bruckner/NOAA.

Staff Report

* More Summit Voice stories about sea turtles

FRISCO — Conservation and recovery efforts under the Endangered Species Act have helped green sea turtles around Florida and Mexico’s Pacific Coast recover to the point that federal biologists have proposed downlisting the species from endangered to threatened. Continue reading

Study tracks blue whales across Southern Ocean

New data will help shape conservation efforts in the waters around Antarctica

Naval training exercises off the coast of California could pose a threat to endangered marine mammals.

Australian and New Zealand researchers have tracked blue whales across thousands of miles in the Southern Ocean to help inform conservation efforts. Photo courtesy NOAA.

Staff Report

FRISCO — As a keystone species in marine ecosystems, blue whales have a significant impact in the ocean around Antarctica, but the population dynamics of the species in the region are still a mystery as the marine mammals recover from the decimation of the whaling era.

That may change following the recent six-week Australia-New Zealand Antarctic Ecosystem Voyage voyage, as researchers tracked the world’s largest creatures across thousands of miles of ocean, detecting their songs from as far as 750 kilometers away. Continue reading

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