About these ads

Environment: Chinese, Texas companies fined $1.26 million for selling ‘dirty’ ATVs and motorcycles

Motorized recreation on Tenderfoot Mountain, Summit County, Colorado.

EPA fines ATV and motorcycle companies for violating Clean Air Act certification requirements. bberwyn photo.

Clean Air crackdown?

Staff Report

FRISCO — The EPA has dinged two Texas companies and four manufacturers in China  with $1.26 million in civil penalties after selling more than 11,000 motorcycles and ATVs that violated clean air rules. The companies will also be banned from selling 2015 vehicles in the U.S.

“EPA’s vehicle certification regulations are an important way we help reduce air pollution and protect public health,” said Cynthia Giles, assistant administrator for EPA’s Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance. “Failing to provide honest and accurate information to EPA compromises our ability to protect clean air for Americans.” Continue reading

About these ads

Study: Maximum warming effect of today’s greenhouse gas emissions felt in just 10 years

sadf

How long do the impacts of greenhouse gases last?

Study shows cutting emissions now will benefit current generations

Staff Report

FRISCO — The maximum heat-trapping effect of today’s greenhouse gas emissions will be felt in about 10 years, scientists said in a new study that refutes the common misconception that today’s emissions won’t be felt for decades and that they are only a problem for future generations.

In their work, Carnegie Institute researchers Katharine Ricke and Ken Caldeira evaluated how long it takes to feel the maximum warming effect caused by a single carbon emission. The results are published in Environmental Research Letters.

“A lot of climate scientists have intuition about how long it takes to feel the warming from a particular emission of carbon dioxide,” Ricke said. “But that intuition might be a little bit out of sync with our best estimates from today’s climate and carbon cycle models.” Continue reading

Environment: EPA proposes new life-saving ozone standards

A NASA satellite image shows air pollution along the East Coast and over the Atlantic.

A NASA satellite image shows air pollution along the East Coast and over the Atlantic.

New rule would more than pay for itself in health care savings

Staff Report

FRISCO — As more and more studies show the harmful health effects of smog, or ground-level ozone, the EPA wants to set new standards to help clean up the air.

Last week the agency unveiled its proposal to lower the standard from 75 parts per billion to as low as 60 ppb, pending completion of a review and comment period, including public hearings.

The Clean Air Act requires EPA to review the standards every five years by following a set of open, transparent steps and considering the advice of a panel of independent experts. EPA last updated these standards in 2008, setting them at 75 ppb. Continue reading

Global warming: Court says California planners must consider climate impacts of emissions from the transportation sector

Colorado travelers can expect some lane closures along I-70 the next few weeks as CDOT repairs the road surface.

Effectively reducing greenhouse gas emissions on a global level means tackling transportation, which accounts for more than 25 percent of all CO2 emissions in the U.S. bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

FRISCO —Planners and elected officials may not be able to ignore the climate impacts of transportation for much longer. A California appeals court last week ruled against the San Diego Association of Governments in a lawsuit centered on a freeway oriented plan that fails to assess climate and public health risks of a transportation plan that invests heavily in freeways and subsidizes sprawl at the expense of public transit.

The transportation sector is the second biggest source of greenhouse gases (28 percent, just behind power generation (32 percent). he majority of greenhouse gas emissions from transportation are CO2 emissions resulting from the combustion of petroleum-based products, like gasoline, in internal combustion engines.

According to the EPA, the largest sources of transportation-related greenhouse gas emissions include passenger cars and light-duty trucks, including sport utility vehicles, pickup trucks, and minivans. These sources account for over half of the emissions from the sector. The remainder of greenhouse gas emissions comes from other modes of transportation, including freight trucks, commercial aircraft, ships, boats, and trains as well as pipelines and lubricants. Continue reading

Report: No gains in U.S. airline fuel efficiency

Industry foot-dragging continues,; lawsuits pending

An Iceland Air jet flies over Greenland en route from Reykjavik to Denver. bberwyn photo.

An Iceland Air jet flies over Greenland en route from Reykjavik to Denver. bberwyn photo.

Staff Report

FRISCO — U.S. airlines aren’t making much progress in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, according to a new report from the International Council on Clean Transportation. Despite some improvement by individual airlines, the analysis showed there was  no net improvement in the fuel efficiency of U.S. domestic operations from 2012 to 2013.

The nonprofit organization also calculated that two of the most fuel efficient carriers  — Alaska and Spirit — had the highest operating profit margins in 2013. Meanwhile less-efficient carriers like Allegiant made profits while using old, polluting and less efficient aircraft. The study findings contradict airline industry arguments that fuel costs automatically push airlines to maximize efficiency. Continue reading

Report outlines simple steps to reduce methane emissions

A natural gas drilling rig in Texas. IMAGE COURTESY THE CREATIVE COMMONS.

A natural gas drilling rig in Texas. IMAGE COURTESY THE CREATIVE COMMONS.

Climate activists pushing EPA to adopt strict methane standards

Staff Report

FRISCO — Existing, low-cost technology, along with better maintenance and best management practices could easily cut U.S. methane emissions from fossil fuel operations in half, climate activists said this week, advocating for the adoption of methane standards.

The path toward those reductions is outlined by climate advocates in a new report that also shows that such standards would help improve air quality in other ways. Continue reading

Environment: Cold weather road ecology institute seeks alternatives to chemical road de-icers

This is what we like to see!

Clearing the roads in Frisco, Colorado.

A little bit of salt on your french fries is fine; a lot of salt on the road kills trees and fish

Staff Report

FRISCO — Highway engineers and scientists know that that massive use of chemical road de-icers has significant environmental impacts. Salt and the various derivatives used to keep roadways open kills trees and degrades water quality.

Just last year, the EPA found salt building up in groundwater near highways in the eastern U.S. Across the country, the U.S. spends $2.3 billion each year on the removal of highway snow and ice plus another $5 billion to mitigate the hidden costs associated with the process.

The hidden costs include long-term impacts of salt, sand and chemical deicers on the natural environment and road infrastructure as well as short-term impacts on semi-trailer trucks and other vehicles from rust and corrosion. Continue reading

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 7,858 other followers