Poll: Breckenridge residents want a parking structure

BMX biking Breckenridge Colorado

A crowd of tourists watches a BMX bike demo in Breckenridge. Colorado.

Voters support new tax to address parking and congestion

Staff Report

FRISCO — Polling early this summer in Breckenridge appears to confirm what many residents and visitors already know — parking and congestion are serious issues for the Colorado resort town, which in some ways is choking on its own success.

According to the survey, voters want their town leaders to make parking and congestion a top priority, and they think a tax on lift tickets and special events is the way to pay for it. Continue reading

Summit County: Frey Gulch restoration begins

Construction of new dirt bike trails also under way

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The Forest Service and volunteer partners are simultaneously building new dirt bike trails and closing forest roads in the Tenderfoot Mountain area.

Staff Report

FRISCO — The U.S. Forest Service is implementing restoration plans associated with approval of the new off-road motorcycle trail system on Tenderfoot Mountain.

The trail system, long a local point of contention, was approved last year based on a compromise agreement among stakeholders. The Forest Service has already started building part of the trail, with new single-track visible just a few feet above, and running parallel to Straight Creek Road.

This summer, Tenderfoot Mountain Road (#66.2B) in Frey Gulch will be closed and rehabilitated in order to improve water quality and improved habitat for fish and wildlife. The restoration of Frey Gulch was included as a condition the trail system permit. Continue reading

Morning photo: Sunday set

Overview …

FRISCO —I made it out for an early morning photo sesh/dogwalk today, heading to one of my favorite wrinkled areas along the shore of Dillon Reservoir. This particular stretch of shoreline is notched by deep coves, which is good for photography, because you can find different vantage points, in relation to the water and the mountains, to make the most of the reflections, and using the vegetation along the water’s edge to help frame the scenes. Once again, I was struck by how fast our area’s lodgepole pine forests are regrowing after the pine beetle outbreak that move through the north-central Colorado mountains in the late 1990s and early 2000s. In places that were logged early, many of the new trees are already two- to four-feet tall and growing densely, just like the old lodgepole pine forest. This morning’s clouds, fueled with moisture from the remnants of Tropical Storm Dolores, helped soften the light. Click on the images in this set to choose the full-size option, especially for the pano shot, and visit our online Fine Art America gallery for more Colorado landscape photography.

Morning photo: Half light

From the vault …

FRISCO — Super-bright sunlight is great if you’re trying to catch a tan, but for mountain photography, I prefer the softer illumination of half-light. Sometimes just a thin layer of clouds can take the edge off the brightness and help shift the light just enough create magic. like in the image of the rays over the Continental Divide. In the crepuscular predawn light, you can open the camera shutter for several seconds, which adds a whole new layer of richness to the exposure. And every few years, during a solar eclipse, the light can be otherworldly! Click on the images in this set and choose the full-size option, and visit our online Fine Art America gallery for more Colorado landscape photography.

Morning photo: The wide view …

Lovely landscapes

FRISCO —Many of the vistas in the Colorado high country are so expansive that they’re hard to capture in a single frame without a good wide angle landscape lens. Mountains stretch across the horizon as far as the eye can see and tower up high into the sky. But there’s another option — some newer smartphone cameras feature a panorama option, which enables you to move the camera, in vertical mode, across the landscape. I’ve been exploring this feature the past couple of months, finding that, even without a tripod, you can do the scenery justice. Click on the images in this set and choose the full-size option to see the full-size panos, and visit our online Fine Art America gallery for more Colorado landscape photography.

Morning photo: Sunday set

Summer days …

FRISCO —From dawn to dusk, the light has been fantastic the past few days here in the Colorado high country. I was able to range a little farther from home than usual, visiting Leadville a couple of times for teen-run music festival and stopping by Mayflower Gulch along the way. From the scruffy foothills east of Leadville, the view of the giant Sawatch range is always impressive and it was a special treat to watch the sun set behind Mt. Elbert, Colorado’s highest peak. Mayflower Gulch is pretty amazing any time of year, but really comes to life with wildflowers in mid-summer.

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram for daily photo updates and visit our online Fine Art America gallery for more Colorado landscape photography. Buying art from our galleries helps support independent journalism, or you make a direct donation via PayPal.

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New bug outbreak hitting Colorado trees

State foresters say pine needle scale infestation may be linked with heavy use of pesticides in war against pine beetles

Pine needle scale is weakening and killing conifer trees in the Colorado mountains.

Pine needle scale is weakening and killing conifer trees in the Colorado mountains, possibly as a result of the earlier heavy application of pesticides used to try and kill mountain pine beetles. @bberwyn photo.

By Bob Berwyn

FRISCO — Colorado forest experts are documenting an unprecedented outbreak of pine needle scale on conifer trees in Grand, Summit and Eagle counties that may be linked with the widespread application of pesticides used several years ago to try and kill mountain pine beetles.

The intensive use of those pesticides may have wiped out beneficial insects like predatory wasps and beetles that keep pine needle scale in check, said Granby-based Ron Cousineau, district forester for the Colorado State Forest Service.

“Most of the concentrated spray for mountain pine beetle ended about three, four or five years ago. That’s when we started seeing the buildup of pine needle scale,” Cousineau said. Continue reading

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