About these ads

Morning photo: Purple mountains, really!

A quick Summit set …

Lookin' like Kodachrome!

Lookin’ like Kodachrome!

.FRISCO — I really do dig the way iPhone sensors pick up colors in the sky, and especially in the clouds — just check out the last picture in this set! So in the course of wandering around Summit County the last couple of days, I did manage to stop and point my camera at various things, usually involving wildflowers, the sky, clouds and/or some distant peaks. I’ve recently started shooting a lot more images in vertical format, because they’re easier to crop for Instagram that way. It kind of reminds of the old square-film format, so sometimes I pretend I’m shooting with a Hasselblad.

If you enjoy our near-daily feed of high country images, please visit our online gallery at Fine Art America.

And if you want to keep those photos coming, along with our stellar environmental reporting, visit our Rocky Mountain Climate Ranger crowdfunding page at Beacon. We’re at 70 percent of our goal and really could use your help to help sustain world-class environmental reporting.

Donate to the Rocky Mountain Climate Ranger project

mtnYour contribution to this independent journalism project will be matched dollar for dollar by Beacon. Click to learn more and make a donation. Continue reading

About these ads

Crowdfunding: Nearly 70 percent there!

The Rocky Mountain Climate Ranger Project needs your support

It's getting warm around here!

It’s getting warm around here!

Love the Rockies? Support our independent journalism project.

Love the Rockies? Support our independent journalism project.

By Summit Voice

FRISCO — With NOAA reporting yet another record high global temperature for June, and afternoon temperatures soaring into the 80s here in Frisco, there’s every reason to believe that we’re heading for uncharted climate territory in the Rocky Mountains. Already, the birds and bees are out of synch with wildflowers, the snowpack is melting weeks earlier than it used to, and spring dust storms are blackening the Rocky Mountain snowpack more frequently each year.

It’s really important to know what those changes mean for us, and especially for future generations — our kids and grandkids — because they will have to live in the greenhouse-gas warmed world that we’ve created with just a few decades of fossil fuel consumption. That’s why once again I’m asking you, faithful Summit Voice readers and subscribers, to support our Rocky Mountain Climate Ranger project my making a pledge right now at Beacon, our crowdfunding partner: http://www.beaconreader.com/projects/rocky-mountain-climate-rangers.

And just to be clear, the Beacon-backed Climate Ranger project won’t have any negative effect on Summit Voice. In fact, your support will help enrich the Summit Voice news and photo feed.

Some of you already responded to our grassroots appeal in the last few months. It was your generous response that encouraged us to pursue funding for this two-month father-son climate journalism trek. And right now, Beacon is generously matching every pledge dollar for dollar, so when you support us, your money will be doubled. We’re only about a week away from the end of our pledge drive (July 31) and we’ll only be funded if we get the full amount, so your support is critical.

You can support the project for as little as $5 but we have some great incentives for larger pledges, including a free harvest dinner at the popular Sunshine Cafe in Dillon. A $100 pledge includes dinner for two, along with a climate journalism presentation at the Sunshine Cafe. It’s a great deal, and you’d pay almost that much just to have a nice dinner for two, so why not support homegrown environmental journalism at the same time.

For $200, you’ll be invited to the dinner AND you’ll be eligible for a large-format fine art print from one of Summit Voice’s acclaimed online galleries, or an image from the reporting trek — and I’m sure we’ll get some great shots!

With our deadline approaching, please consider making a pledge now, and if you can’t, please pass along this post via email to anyone who might be interested. Thanks for reading and your continued support.

Donate to the Rocky Mountain Climate Ranger project

mtnYour contribution to this independent journalism project will be matched dollar for dollar by Beacon. Click to learn more and make a donation.

Opinion: Lake Hill development should be carbon-neutral

jh

Bob Berwyn.

Smart up-front planning can minimize our carbon footprint

By Bob Berwyn

FRISCO — Passage of the Lake Hill land conveyance bill by the U.S. Senate last week is good news for Summit County’s efforts to try and keep up with the demand for affordable housing in the pricey mountain resort region, and will also help the U.S. Forest Service by funding a new administrative and maintenance facility. Now that the deal is done, it’s time to start thinking about making sure that the Lake Hill neighborhood becomes a model of sustainable development. Continue reading

Morning photo: Four Corners magic

From the archives …

fghj

Somewhere in the desert …

FRISCO — If you’ve never wandered down across that strange and wonderful spot where Colorado, Arizona, Utah and New Mexico all come together, it’s time to get on the road and check it out. Of course the Four Corners monument itself has bcome quite the tourist attraction, but the surrounding countryside is classic American desert, with vast swaths of sagebrush leading up to piñon and juniper dotted mesas. You won’t get any guarantees that the light will be good, but last time Leigh and I passed through the area (It’s been a while), it was pure magic. Continue reading

Morning photo: Take 2!

Mountain view

h

Mount if the Holy Cross from near Shrine Pass.

FRISCO — This set is a grab-bag of images from the past week or so, including a very early morning trek up to the Vail Pass area. Right now, we’re definitely in high summer in terms of light. The rest of the year, details of the mountain faces are often hidden by long shadows, but the high summer sun angle reveals details that you can’t see the rest of the year.

Summit Voice readers, if you enjoy our daily photo posts, please have a look at the Rocky Mountain Climate Ranger Project. We are trying to fund a two month reporting trek to do some some in-depth reporting on how global warming is changing the Rockies. Along with the stories, we’ll have live social media chats and we will be doing plenty of photography to be featured in our morning photo series.

It’s a crowdfunded project and we need your help to make it happen. Every little bit helps, and if you’re feeling generous, you can earn a free dinner at the Sunshine Cafe in Dillon, along with framed fine art prints from the Summit Voice gallery. Please visit the Rocky Mountain Climate Ranger project pledge page and share the link with your friends! Continue reading

Morning photo: Flower power!

Fresh blooms …

Tundra wildflowers, Loveland Pass, Colorado.

Tundra wildflowers, Loveland Pass, Colorado.

FRISCO — It’s that sweet time of year when high country wildflower start to go nuts, I’ve never seen as many tall blue penstemon as in the past few days, which makes me realize that the flowers have their own cycles and rhythms that we can’t begin to understand yet. So on Tuesday morning, I ventured up to the Shrine Pass area to have a look, but the bulk of the blooming is still ahead. Still, using back-lighting, careful composition and the iPone camera’s HDR option, I was able to scare up a couple of decent shots. Continue reading

Morning photo: Best and brightest?

Kodachrome moments in Colorado

buff sunset

As Dillon Reservoir filled, it inundated shoreline meadows, creating a weird dynamic ecosystem at water’s edge. Rapid, cyclical fluctuations in water levels is part of what makes reservoirs big sources of greenhouse gases.

FRISCO — So many spots, so close to home! What a blessing, as a photographer, to live in an area with so many photo ops, from daisies bathed by the morning sun, to the warm alpenglow on Peak 1. The daisies, of course, are growing right outside our front door in a raised flowerbed in one of the most densely populated areas in Summit County. All the rest of the shots are taken within a few miles our Frisco home, Enjoy!

dew drops on daisies ...

dew drops on daisies …

Same sunset, different angle, different Instagram filter.

Same sunset, different angle, different Instagram filter.

Early morning Columbine along Swan Mountain Road.

Early morning Columbine along Swan Mountain Road.

cooling it off!

cooling it off!

 

Morning photo: Summit skies IV

Super moon, and then some …

moon

The July “super moon” sets over Peak 1 in Summit County, Colorado.

FRISCO — A few lovely days and evenings in Summit County yielded a handful of fine images showcasing summery Colorado skies, and after an early morning dash around Dillon Reservoir, I even managed to get a halfway decent shot of the moon setting right behind Peak 1. I know the daily showers during monsoon season aren’t the most popular with anyone hoping to spend the whole day outside, but as a photographer, I really appreciate the color and texture of the clouds. If you like our daily snapshots please visit our online gallery at Fine Art America. Continue reading

Morning photo: Saturday set

More iPhoneography

mb

Wood arch.

FRISCO — I’ve been to this little cove (photo above) at Dillon Reservoir more than 100 times in the past five years, but a few weeks ago found a new perspective by crawling on my belly. It’s one of the things I love about photography — it helps me look at things in a new light. In this case, I was shooting social media shots for a wildflower Twitter Series by @CopperCondos and really wanted something fresh. I took about 10 shots, tilting the iPhone vertically into different positions, knowing that the smartphone’s incredibly smart sensor would give me at least a couple of images with good light balance, and using the HDR setting also helped get some of the wood detail and good lighting on the mid-ground flowers. It lost sharpness from cropping and Instagram filters. At some point I’ll edit the original file with out the filters to see if I can get the same vibrancy but more crispness. Continue reading

Moose encounters near Aspen prompt warnings

‘If things continue this way at Maroon Bells, it’s not if someone will be injured, but when’

Colorado moose

A moose cow and calves grazing near Berthoud Pass, Colorado. Bob Berwyn photo.

Staff Report

FRISCO — Colorado’s growing moose population is causing a safety issue in the popular Maroon Bells area, near Aspen, according to state wildlife officials, who say people are getting to close to the animals along the Crater Lake Trail. Forest Service rangers temporarily closed the trail, but said that risky behavior continues, despite numerous posted signs warning of the potential danger. Continue reading

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 7,243 other followers