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Psst! Wanna see some carbon dioxide?

New NASA visual helps trace path of greenhouse gases

Staff Report

FRISCO — In a way, addressing global warming is like fighting a ghost. How do you tackle odorless and colorless heat-trapping gases like carbon dioxide and methane?

NASA, the government agency that literally has the best global perspective on climate change, has just released a new computer generated animation that help show the source of greenhouse gases and how they disperse around the planet. Continue reading

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Study show drop in Beaufort Sea polar bear numbers

A polar bear in the Arctic. PHOTO COURTESY USGS/SUSANNE MILLER.

A polar bear in the Arctic. PHOTO COURTESY USGS/SUSANNE MILLER.

Is dwindling sea ice a factor?

Staff report

FRISCO — Polar bear populations in the southern Beaufort Sea  dropped 40 percent between 2000 and 2010, biologists say in a new study. The research suggests that survival of adult bears and cubs was especially low from 2004 to 2006, when most of the decline occurred.

“Of the 80 cubs observed in Alaska from 2004 to 2007, only 2 are known to have survived,” said Jeff Bromaghin, a U.S. Geological Survey research statistician and lead author of the study. Continue reading

Climate: Texas school board tries to include anti-science message in new textbooks

New books include misleading passages about climate science

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Warmer than average temps prevailed around most of the globe in October 2014, according to NASA’s evaluation of the latest satellite data.

Staff Report

FRISCO —New textbooks under consideration for Texas schools may mislead students when it comes to climate science, the American Meteorological Society said in a Nov. 3 letter to the state’s board of education. The group says that several social studies textbooks being considered for classroom use include factual errors. Continue reading

Morning photo: First storm

Crystalline magic

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Morning mist over Dillon, Colorado.

FRISCO — Winter landed all at once in Summit County, with a storm that delivered several feet of snow to the mountains and valleys. The seasonal transformation happens every year, but it’s still a miracle to see it unfold, with a soft and cold blanket of white settling over the land. to stay in place for half a year, through mid-April or so. Welcome back, winter! Continue reading

Environment: South Dakota Native Americans describe House vote on Keystone XL pipeline as an ‘act of war’

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War over the Keystone XL pipeline?

‘We are a sovereign nation and we are not being treated as such … We will close our reservation borders to Keystone XL’

By Summit Voice

FRISCO — Conservation groups and climate activists aren’t the only ones hopping mad about the Congressional rush to approve the Keystone XL pipeline. Native Americans in South Dakota say they consider last week’s House vote to approve the pipeline “an act of war.”

The proposed project, aimed at pumping tar sands crude oil from Canada to U.S. refineries, would completely cross South Dakota. Environmentalists oppose the pipeline because it represents continued reliance on fossil fuels. Most, if not all, of the oil would be exported to other countries, so the argument that it would somehow lower fuel prices rings hollow and false. Continue reading

Morning photo: Post-storm glow

November …

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Sunlight paints Peak 1, in the Tenmile Range, as a winter storm clears out.

FRISCO — I feel like I’ve been holding my breath the past few weeks, waiting to see if it will actually snow. That late-fall period has been suspenseful for me since I was a little kid, starting to get seriously hooked on skiing, but the feeling has intensified the last few years, as global warming creates more and more uncertainty in global weather patterns. From the way I understand it — and I’ve been studying this a lot — there’s every reason to believe that we could experience a winter without much snow at any time. Just look at California the past few years. It’s easy to see how a shift of the regional weather pattern could bring a sustained and bitter drought to Colorado. That’s probably why I breathed such a deep sigh of relief this week as the skies finally relented and dropped more than a foot of snow even here at the valley level in Frisco.

Follow our Instagram feed for daily photo updates and visit our online gallery for a great selection of Colorado landscape and nature images, available as fine art prints and greeting cards. Continue reading

Global warming: Oceans at all-time record high temps

Pacific Ocean is cooking, even without El Niño

NOAA Sea Surface Temperature anomaly (with respect to period 1854-2013) averaged over global oceans (red) and over North Pacific (0-60oN, 110oE-100oW) (cyan). September 2014 temperatures broke the record for both global and North Pacific Sea Surface Temperatures. b) Sea Surface Temperature anomaly of September 2014 from NOAA's ERSST dataset. Credit: Axel Timmermann

NOAA Sea Surface Temperature anomaly (with respect to period 1854-2013) averaged over global oceans (red) and over North Pacific (0-60oN, 110oE-100oW) (cyan). September 2014 temperatures broke the record for both global and North Pacific Sea Surface Temperatures. b) Sea Surface Temperature anomaly of September 2014 from NOAA’s ERSST dataset.
Credit: Axel Timmermann.

Staff Report

FRISCO — Global ocean temperatures have soared to the highest level in recorded history this year, and the rate of warming has accelerated since April, according to scientists with the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

“This summer has seen the highest global mean sea surface temperatures ever recorded since their systematic measuring started,” said Axel Timmermann, a climate scientist at the university’s International Pacific Research Center. “Temperatures even exceed those of the record-breaking 1998 El Niño year,” Timmermann said, adding that the new data analysis shows that the global warming pause, if there was one, is over.

“The 2014 global ocean warming is mostly due to the North Pacific, which has warmed far beyond any recorded value,” he said, adding that the temperature trend in the Pacific has shifted hurricane tracks, weakened trade winds, and bleached corals around the Hawaiian Islands. Continue reading

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