Warmer oceans lead to more extreme coastal rainstorms

Study tracks eastern Mediterranean climate trends

This image shows simulated precipitation (over 24 hours from 6 to 7 July 2012) of a model run using observed sea surface temperature (a) and (b) using a colder SST representative of the early 1980s). The black cross marks the town of Krymsk, the thin black lines are height contours with a distance of 150 metres.

This image shows simulated precipitation (over 24 hours from 6 to 7 July 2012) of a model run using observed sea surface temperature (a) and (b) using a colder SST representative of the early 1980s). The black cross marks the town of Krymsk, the thin black lines are height contours with a distance of 150 metres. Graphic courtesy GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre.

Staff Report

FRISCO — Rapidly warming sea surface temperatures are resulting in more extreme coastal rainstorms, Russian and German researchers said after analyzing climate data from the eastern Mediterranean and the Black Sea.

The impetus for the study was a deadly 2012 flash flood in the Russian city of Krymsk, near the Black Sea coast that killed 172 people. The Black Sea and eastern Mediterranean have warmed by about 2 degrees Celsius since the early 1980s.

The study was led led by scientists at the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research in Kiel, Germany, and published in the international journal Nature Geoscience. Continue reading

Spike in extreme rains linked with global warming

Raindrops splashing into a pond in Vail. PHOTO BY DYLAN BERWYN.

A new study documents a distinct increase in extreme rainfall events linked with global warming.

Southeast Asia sees biggest increase in dangerous rainstorms

Staff Report

FRISCO —There’s clear evidence that global warming is causing more frequent record-breaking rainstorms, according to scientists with the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research.

The upward trend in extreme rainfall events has been striking in the last 30 years, and particularly noticeable in Southeast Asia, the researchers said in a new study, explaining that the spike lies outside the range of natural variability.

The worldwide increase is consistent with rising global temperatures, which are caused by greenhouse-gas emissions from burning fossil fuels, the scientists said. Continue reading

Losing ground: Coastal erosion seen as big threat in Alaska

dfg

A NASA Earth Observatory image shows part of Alaska’s coast.

New USGS study measures North Slope shoreline losses

Staff Report

FRISCO — In the eternal battle between land and sea, the sea appears to be winning in northern Alaska, where much of the coastline is retreating at a rate of more than three feet per year, according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey.

The region has some of the highest shoreline erosion rates in the world, according to the research, which analyzed more than 50 years worth of measurements.

“Coastal erosion along the Arctic coast of Alaska is threatening Native Alaskan villages, sensitive ecosystems, energy and defense related infrastructure, and large tracts of Native Alaskan, State, and Federally managed land,” said Suzette Kimball, acting director of the USGS. Continue reading

Climate: National Parks face huge sea level threats

sdfg

Can the National Park Service protect coastal assets from rising sea levels? Photo courtesy U.S. Air Force.

Study says $40 billion in park assets at risk

Staff Report

FRISCO — Researchers are only a third of the way through their efforts to catalog how rising sea level threatens national parks, but they’ve already documented risks to more than $40 billion worth of park assets.

“Many coastal parks already deal with threats from sea level rise and from storms that damage roads, bridges, docks, water systems and parking lots,” National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis said in a prepared statement. “This infrastructure is essential to day-to-day park operations, but the historical and cultural resources such as lighthouses, fortifications and archaeological sites that visitors come to see are also at risk of damage or loss.” Continue reading

Nobel laureates warn of global warming risks

'j

2015 is on track to be the warmest year on record for Earth.

Unsustainable plunder of the planet represents a serious threat to humanity

Staff Report

FRISCO — When several dozen of the world’s smartest people — all recognized as Nobel Laureates — gather on an island and declare that climate change and the unsustainable plunder of natural resources are a serious threat, it might be time to listen.

That’s what happened this week during the 65th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting, as physicists, chemists and many Nobel Prize winners ended their conference by signing a declaration on climate change, urging nations of the world to “take decisive action to limit future global emissions.” Continue reading

Climate: Widespread heatwaves setting all-time temperature records across the northern hemisphere

dfgh

Above average temperatures are expected to persist across the Far West for the next three months.

Global warming is here …

Staff Report

FRISCO — With El Niño still strengthening in the Pacific Ocean, many parts of the northern hemisphere are breaking all-time heat record this week, including England, where tennis players in the early Wimbledon rounds have to contend with the hottest temperatures ever recorded in the UK.

The ongoing heatwaves parts of Asia, North America and Europe may be a clear sign that 2015 will, as expected, end up as the hottest year on record for the globe, and a sign of trouble ahead, as deadly heatwaves are expected to increase and put millions of people at risk, with the threat growing every year, according to a recent climate study. Continue reading

Melting Arctic sea ice could ‘cool’ Europe

;ih

Ocean circulation in the North Atlantic is already changing as a result of global warming.

Study tracks links between melting ice cap, Atlantic Ocean currents

Staff Report

FRISCO — The retreat of sea ice caused by global warming could lead to colder weather for parts of northwestern Europe, Canadian researchers said after studying changing ocean dynamics in the North Atlantic.

The new research reinforces previous findings that the shrinking Arctic ice cap is likely to change the delicate balance between the cold and dense water pouring out of the Arctic and the warm waters of the subtropical Atlantic, according to professor G.W.K. Moore, of the University of Toronto Mississauga. Continue reading

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 8,773 other followers