About these ads

Study shows flurry of threats to rainforests

asdf NASA/JPL-Caltech

Tree canopy studies show rapid changes in Amazon rainforest. Photo courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech.

Is global warming the knockout punch?

Staff Report

FRISCO — After watching Amazon forests change for decades, a team of researchers say the region is under the gun from multiple threats that threaten to deliver a knockout punch.

The 35-year study focused on how diverse communities of trees and vines respond when the Amazonian rainforest is fragmented by cattle ranching.

“Lots of trees have died while vines, which favour disturbed forests, proliferate rapidly,” said Jose Luis Camargo of Brazil’s National Institute for Amazonian Research, explaining how the team documented the rapid changes.

But the biggest surprise is that nearby undisturbed forests, which were also being carefully studied, changed as well. Trees there grew and died faster, and the vines also multiplied.

“These changes might be driven by increasing carbon dioxide in the atmosphere,” said Thomas Lovejoy of George Mason University in Virginia, USA, who initiated the long-term study. “Plants use carbon dioxide for photosynthesis and when it increases, the forest evidently becomes more unstable and dynamic, as long as the soils have enough nutrients.”

The investigators say a key implication is that many forests are being affected not only by land-use changes such as habitat fragmentation, but also by global-scale changes such as rising carbon dioxide and climate change. In some cases different drivers reinforce one another, increasing their impacts on forests.

“A big implication is that it’s going to be harder to predict future changes to ecosystems if they’re being affected by several environmental drivers,” said Lovejoy.

The researchers expect such changes to increase in the future.

“Humans continue to dump billions of tons of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere every year, and it’s evidently affecting even the remotest forests on Earth,” said lead author William Laurance of James Cook University in Cairns, Australia.

About these ads

One Response

  1. That’s it. Go after the boogey man climate change, and not the idiot Brazilian people are directly cutting down the forests.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 7,260 other followers

%d bloggers like this: