About these ads

Environment: More Gulf restoration projects coming online

Northern Gulf of Mexico beaches will get some TLC this coming summer as part of the ongoing restoration work in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil disaster.

Northern Gulf of Mexico beaches will get some TLC this coming summer as part of the ongoing restoration work in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil disaster.

Sea turtle and bird habitat improvements planned in Florida, Mississippi and Alabama

By Summit Voice

SUMMIT COUNTY — More restoration projects — valued at about $9 million — to repair damage from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Oil Disaster are set to begin in the next months along the beaches of the Florida panhandle, Mississippi and Alabama, including habitat improvements for nesting sea turtles and seabirds.

The work is part of the second phase of early restoration projects being organized by the Natural Resource Damage Assessment trustees. Altogether, BP will fund $1 billion in early restoration projects.

“These additional projects are important steps in recovering from the oil spill, but they, along with the other Phase I projects, are just first steps,” said Trudy D. Fisher, Chair of the NRDA Trustee Council and Mississippi’s trustee. “Use of the early restoration funding has not moved quickly enough to suit any of us. I want to stress that the NRDA trustees are working hard to see that restoration funding is used in a way that is in the best interest of our natural resources.”

Specificically, the projects will:

Protect nesting habitat for beach-nesting birds from disturbance in order to restore habitat impaired by disturbance from oil spill response activities. It is to be conducted on sandy beaches in Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, Walton, Bay, Gulf, and Franklin counties, Florida; Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge in Baldwin and Mobile counties, Alabama; and the Gulf Islands National Seashore (GUIS) – Mississippi District, and;

reduce artificial lighting impacts on nesting habitat for sea turtles, specifically loggerhead turtles, to restore habitat impaired by disturbance from oil spill response activities. It is being conducted on Gulf State Park in Baldwin County, Alabama; and in Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, Walton, Bay, Gulf, and Franklin counties, Florida.

Early restoration projects represent an initial step toward fulfilling the responsible parties’ obligation to fund the complete restoration of injured natural resources and the services they provide. Early restoration provides an opportunity to implement restoration projects agreed upon by the NRDA trustees and BP under the Framework Agreement prior to the completion of the NRDA.

The damage assessment continues and currently approved early restoration projects are being implemented while additional early restoration planning is under way. BP and other responsible parties are obligated to compensate the public for the full scope of the natural resource injury caused by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, including the cost of assessing such injury and planning for restoration.

Eight early restoration projects are already in various stages of implementation as part of Phase I of early restoration under the Framework Agreement. Updates on the eight Phase I projects are available at www.gulfspillrestoration.noaa.gov.

“The Phase II projects were selected at this time to allow their implementation prior to this spring’s nesting seasons for sea turtles and beach-nesting birds,” said Rachel Jacobson, the Department of the Interior’s Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Fish and Wildlife and Parks. “We greatly appreciate both the public’s engagement in this process and their support for these projects. Implementing projects as quickly as possible will benefit our precious natural resources, the uses they support and the local economy to which they are linked.”

“I appreciate the overwhelming support we have received from the public for these projects which go to the heart of the spill impact on nesting birds and sea turtles,” said Florida trustee representative Mimi A. Drew, special advisor to the Florida Department of Environmental Protection Secretary Herschel T. Vinyard, Jr. “My fellow trustees worked hard with us to ensure project approval in time for the 2013 nesting season.”

“These projects will continue the process of restoring Alabama’s unique coastal resources from injuries sustained by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. We look forward to initiating these projects quickly in order to take advantage of the upcoming nesting seasons,” said N. Gunter Guy, Jr., Commissioner of the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

About these ads

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 7,761 other followers

%d bloggers like this: