About these ads

Citizen scientists could help monitor global bee populations

sadf

A bumblebee gathers pollen from fireweed blossoms in Summit County, Colorado.

Timely data would help establish early warning of threats to world’s food system

By Summit Voice

FRISCO — A new United Nations study suggests that a $2 million program, using volunteer citizen scientists, could help researchers keep better track of the world’s bee populations and form an early warning system alerting scientists to dangers threatening the world’s food system and economies.

The study found that counting and identifying bees regularly for five years at about 200 locations would produce data accurate enough to detect two to five percent annual declines in bee populations. The program could be scaled to fit different regional monitoring needs.

“My goal is to give agencies all around the world an effective way to monitor bees,” said San Francisco State University Professor of Biology Gretchen LeBuhn, lead author of the study. “Biologists have talked a lot about how bee populations are declining, but I don’t think we actually have good data that acts as an early warning signal for possible problems with our food system.”

“The estimated cost of sustaining an international monitoring program is a relatively small investment compared to the potential economic cost of severe pollinator losses,” the study said. Thirty-five percent of the global food supply depends on bees and other pollinators, including crops worth nearly $200 billion each year, according to LeBuhn.

The proposed system relies on paid workers around the globe to count and identify bees using simple “pan traps,” in which bees are attracted to a brightly-colored pan filled with liquid. To determine scalable sampling techniques, costs and time scales for completing the work, the researchers designed simulations using data from eleven previously published multi-year studies.

The research was funded by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, and the monitoring program has already been used in Brazil, Ghana, India, Kenya, Nepal, Pakistan and South Africa, with support from the Global Environment Facility and United Nations Environment Programme. LeBuhn said the long-term goal for the project is to establish a network of monitoring stations to provide data for a global analysis.

“We hope to eventually centralize some of the data collection so that people who are counting bees regionally can contribute to a larger data set.”

LeBuhn is also known for organizing the annual Great Sunflower Project, in which 100,000 citizen scientists across North America volunteer to count bee populations in their own backyards. The project, now in its fifth year, recently found low numbers of bees in urban areas across America, adding weight to the theory that habitat loss is one of the primary reasons for sharp population declines.

The study was published in the Dec. 12 issue of Conservation Biology.

 

About these ads

2 Responses

  1. Using citizen scientists to monitor the world’s bee population sounds like a great idea. The importance and urgency of the matter should be enough to recruit and secure many volunteers for such a project.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 7,403 other followers

%d bloggers like this: