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Morning Photo: June!

The start of summer

June is the month our wild roses bloom.

“In June, as many as a dozen species may burst their buds on a single day.  No man can heed all of these anniversaries; no man can ignore all of them.”  
–  Aldo Leopold

SUMMIT COUNTY — An assortment of June photos; one of them will be the monthly calendar image in the soon-to-be-published Summit Voice calendar. Help us pick the image by voting in the poll at the end of the post. It’s a month that can send even the most down-to-Earth person into flights of poetry, so we’re including some notable quotes and verse to go along with the photos.

June rainbow, Meadow Creek wetlands, Frisco, Colorado.

Emily Dickinson finds transcendent ecstacy in the month of June:

“A something in a summer’s Day
As slow her flambeaux burn away
Which solemnizes me.
A something in a summer’s noon –
A depth — an Azure — a perfume –
Transcending ecstasy.
And still within a summer’s night
A something so transporting bright
I clap my hands to see –
Then veil my too inspecting face
Lets such a subtle — shimmering grace
Flutter too far for me –
The wizard fingers never rest –
The purple brook within the breast
Still chafes it narrow bed –
Still rears the East her amber Flag –
Guides still the sun along the Crag
His Caravan of Red –
So looking on — the night — the morn
Conclude the wonder gay –
And I meet, coming thro’ the dews
Another summer’s Day!”
–  Emily Dickinson, A Something in a Summer’s Day

A nice view of Farmers Korner, the Upper Blue and the Tenmile Range from the tip of an 80-foot tall Douglas Fir growing at Sapphire Point. PHOTO BY DYLAN BERWYN.

Poppies growing in a Silverthorne garden.

June is a little late for Tulips in many places, but not at 10,000 feet in the Colorado high country.

A June sunrise lights up Peak One, above Frisco, Colorado.

“It is better to be a young June-bug than an old bird of paradise”
–  Mark Twain

June runoff in a small waterfall.

Main Street, Frisco, Colorado after a June snowstorm.

“Now spring has clad the grove in green,
And strew’d the lea wi’ flowers;
The furrow’d, waving corn is seen
Rejoice in fostering showers.
While ilka thing in nature join
Their sorrows to forego,
O why thus all alone are mine
The weary steps o’ woe!

That little floweret’s peaceful lot,
In yonder cliff that grows,
Which, save the linnet’s flight, I wot,
Nae ruder visit knows,
Was mine, till Love has o’er me past,
And blighted a’ my bloom;
And now, beneath the withering blast,
My youth and joy consume.”
–  Robert Burns, Now Spring Has Clad the Grove in Green

Officers Gulch pond.

“In these divine pleasures permitted to me of walks in the June night under moon and stars, I can put my life as a fact before me and stand aloof from its honor and shame.”
–  Ralph Waldo Emerson, Journals

Clouds lift after a June snowstorm at Loveland Pass.

Last rays of the sun on the summer solstice, Loveland Pass.

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2 Responses

  1. Choices, eye of the beholder.

  2. Whoops, I missed the rosebud photo.

    Please change one tulip vote to a rosebud vote.

    Thanks!

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